Foundation degree criminology with applied social science icon

Foundation degree criminology with applied social science







HULL COLLEGE HE SCHEME


AWARD SPECIFICATION


HEALTH & SCIENCE ROUTE


FOUNDATION DEGREE Criminology with APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCE





Award Programme Specification:

Hull College HE Scheme


1. Awarding Institution / Body

Leeds Metropolitan University

2. Teaching Institution

Hull College

^ 3. Programme Accredited by

Leeds Metropolitan University

4. Final Awards

FdA Criminology with Applied Social Science

^ 5. Route Title(s)

Health and Science

6. UCAS Code

L390

7 QAA Benchmarking Group(s)

  • QAA benchmarks for Criminology, Law, Psychology, Sociology

  • QAA Foundation Degree Qualification Benchmark




  1. General Aims and Objectives of the Route and Award

The Health and Science Route adopts the overall aims and objectives of the Hull College HE Scheme. The Route and its constituent awards are developed with reference to and fully adopt QAA Policy on Programme Specification 1999 and guidelines 2006.


In accordance with QAA Foundation Degree Benchmarks each Award within the Route has been developed in consultation with a variety of commercial and public sector employers. Each Award specification within the Route contains narrative describing the implementation of that consultation in respect of the specific Award.


Within the Hull College Scheme a key driver of Foundation Degree development is to support the up-skilling of the workforce in Yorkshire and the Humber region in support of economic growth.


The Health & Science Route adopts the overall aims and objectives of the Hull College HE Scheme. However, to satisfy the needs of the Health & Science route, the generic Scheme aims and objectives are contextualised and added to as follows:


  • Provide foundation certificates, foundation and honours degrees for a number of specific areas in health, science and related disciplines

  • Provide curricula which develop a range of higher level technical, vocational, academic and transferable skills relevant of individual award

  • Develop independent learners

  • Widen participation in the areas of health, care, science, early years, family and community, counselling, psychology, criminology, forensics and complementary therapies and related disciplines

  • Increase access to higher education from under-represented groups in the local community

  • Provide a framework in which employers, partners, stakeholders and providers can collaborate to develop the curriculum

  • Contribute to the skill base of Yorkshire and the Humber in the context of the development of the Health and Science and related sectors

  • Produce capable and well-rounded graduates who will make a contribution to the labour market needs of the local region and to national economies and have appropriate knowledge and skills to fulfil their aspirations and potential


^ General Aims and Objectives of the Award

This award is one of four awards within the Route that have been developed under the programme heading ‘Foundation Degrees Criminology with Applied Social Science’. The underlying aim of each award is to support learners in the development of a multi-disciplinary perspective on the study of crime, whilst also facilitating a degree of specialisation to reflect learner’s differing vocational and developmental aspirations.

^ The aims of this award are to:

  • provide a full-time and part-time foundation degree route for current and prospective employees and employers in agencies and organisations concerned with crime control, criminal justice, victim and offender welfare and support, and community cohesion and development;

  • provide curricula which develop a range of technical, vocational and key skills relevant to the operations of agencies and organisations in the crime control, criminal justice and victim/offender support sector;

  • develop independent learners;

  • widen awareness of and participation in the areas of crime control, criminal justice, victim and offender welfare and support, and community cohesion and development; and also to increase access to higher education from under-represented groups in the local community;

  • provide a framework in which employers, employer bodies and providers can collaborate to develop the curriculum;

  • contribute to the skill base of Hull and other localities in the context of the demands posed by high crime rates and public fear and concern about the threat posed by criminality;

  • produce capable and well-rounded graduates who will make a contribution to the labour market needs of the local regional and national economies and have appropriate knowledge and skills.




The objectives of the award are to:

  • enable students to develop transferable skills and knowledge which will enhance their contribution and develop their full potential in fields of crime control, criminal justice, victim and offender welfare and support, and community cohesion and development

  • create opportunities for progression and access to relevant degree level courses for suitably qualified practitioners and employees in crime control, criminal justice, victim and offender support, community cohesion and development, and related activities;

  • develop reflective skills and problem-solving techniques in applying knowledge and skills to a variety of contexts within the area of crime control, criminal justice, victim and offender welfare and support, and community cohesion and development

  • integrate relevant work based learning to enhance students’ effectiveness in the workplace;

  • respond to changes and demands in the regional labour market in this sector

  1. Award Learning Outcomes

In addition to those of the Route, the award contextualises the generic Scheme and Route learning outcomes as follows:


Level 1 Outcomes

On completion of Level 1 students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of underlying concepts and principles of criminology and the social sciences (in particular, psychology, sociology and law)




  • Present, evaluate and interpret data to develop lines of argument and make sound judgments in accordance with basic theories and concepts of criminology and the social sciences




  • Formulate solutions to clearly defined relatively simple problems and situations




  • Communicate the results of their study/work accurately and reliably using structured and coherent arguments




  • Access and use a range of learning resources in order to acquire the skills to begin the process of moving from dependent to independent learning




  • Begin to take responsibility for their own learning and development




  • Commence studies at level 2


Level 2 Outcomes

On completion of Level 2 students should be able to:

  • Challenge received opinion from a position of knowledge and begin to develop own criteria and judgment




  • Apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they were first studied including where appropriate, the application of those principles in an employment context




  • Analyse realistic, semi-open problems and situations and select appropriate methods for their resolution in a considered manner




  • Effectively communicate information, arguments and analysis in a variety of forms




  • Participate effectively in interdependent learning activities and function effectively as a more independent learner




  • Analyse learning needs and develop appropriate strategies




  • Commence studies at level 3




  • Evaluate and reflect upon their progress towards their chosen career - PPD


The aims and outcomes specified above reflect those which all awards within the Route will address when formulating award aims and outcomes. However, the differing nature and focus of the awards offer the ability to contextualise the generic Route aims and outcomes further, and to add to them. In this way, coherent award aims and outcomes are created which both satisfy the needs of the award and reflect the overall aims and outcomes of the Scheme and Route.

In conjunction with the subject outcomes specified in award modules below, this Award seeks to develop the following subject-specific outcomes:


Learners studying the ‘major subject’, i.e. criminology will be able to evidence the following: [QAA Benchmark Standards; August 2006]:

  • An understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches that have developed and are developing in relation to crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance

  • An awareness of how crime and victimisation are constructed in the media and by agents and practices of crime control.

  • Able to understand and demonstrate the relationship of social class, gender, age, race, ethnicity, and other salient aspects of diversity in relation to crime, victimisation and responses to these phenomena.

  • An understanding of the social and historical development of policing, of the changing values governing police work including human rights, of the structure and culture of police work in different locations, of policing diversity, and of new and emergent forms of private and state policing.

  • An understanding of the social and historical development of punishment including courts and hearings for adults and young people; the governance and values of the relevant institutions; the theory and practice of sentencing; prison and community based penalties; and the place of human rights in these processes.

  • An understanding of the organisation and governance of efforts to prevent harm and ensure personal safety, and of human rights issues in relation to these.

  • An understanding of the nature and appropriate use of research strategies and methods in relation to issues of crime, victimisation, and responses to crime and deviance.

  • An understanding of the value of comparative analysis.

  • An understanding of complex social problems and the relationships between them in terms of criminological theory and empirical evidence in relation to crime, victimisation, and responses to crime and deviance.

  • An understanding of the distinctive character of the discipline of criminology in relation to other forms of understanding, such as other disciplines and everyday explanations.

Cognitive abilities

  • An appreciation of the complexity of crime and victimisation; able to assess the merits of competing theories and explanations.

  • An appreciation of the range of responses to crime and deviance and an ability to interpret the values and practices of the agencies which administer them.

  • An understanding of how to design research appropriately in relation to a specific problem, how to gather, retrieve and synthesise information, including comparative data; an understanding of how to evaluate research data including both quantitative and qualitative data.

  • An understanding of how to assess the ethical issues arising in particular research situations.

  • Ability to review and evaluate criminological evidence.

  • Ability to develop a reasoned argument.



Discipline-specific skills

  • An ability to understand the nature of criminological questions and investigate them.

  • Ability to analyse, assess methodologically and communicate information and empirical research findings about crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance.

  • Ability to identify a range of different strategies and methods and use appropriate research tools in relation to criminological problems, including quantitative, qualitative and evaluative techniques.

  • Ability to investigate criminological questions in relation to victimisation, crime, responses to crime and deviance, and representations of these.

  • Ability to identify the ethical issues and the range of ethical problems in research into criminological questions and to take action within the Guidelines of Ethical Practice for Criminology.

  • Ability to undertake and present scholarly work.

  • Ability to examine the relevance of criminological work on crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance, including representations of these in relation to issues of social, public and civic policy at a national, international and global level.


Learners studying the ‘minor subject’ i.e. applied social science will be able to evidence the following:


A] Sociology QAA Benchmark Standards – 4.2

  1. the ability to formulate and investigate sociologically informed questions;

  2. competence in using major theoretical perspectives and concepts in Sociology, and their application to social life;

  3. the capacity to analyse, assess, and communicate empirical sociological information;

  4. the ability to recognize the relevance of sociological knowledge to social, public, and civic policy.


B] Psychology QAA Benchmark Standards 4.b.ii

  1. apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognizing that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications;

  2. integrate ideas and findings across the multiple perspectives in psychology and recognize distinctive psychological approaches to relevant issues;

  3. identify and evaluate general patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning and experience;


C] Law QAA Benchmark Standards]

  1. Knowledge: A student should demonstrate a basic knowledge and understanding of the principal features of the legal system(s) studied, viz s/he:

  • should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a substantial range of major concepts, values, principles and rules of that system;

  • should be able to explain the main legal institutions and procedures of that system;

  • should be able to demonstrate the study in depth and in context of some substantive areas of the legal system.

  1. Sources and research: A student should demonstrate a basic ability

  • to identify accurately the issue(s) which require researching;

  • to identify and retrieve up-to-date legal information, using paper and electronic sources;

  • to use primary and secondary legal sources relevant to the topic under study.

Widening Participation

Some groups within the community are un/under-represented in the field of crime control, criminal justice, victim and offender welfare and support, and community cohesion and development. Hull College’s strategy is to promote the recruitment of under-represented groups within the sector, as well as in the College. The College is involved with various initiatives toward this end, such as: School links & Taster courses, Adult Learners Week, expanding Access provision etc.

  1. Award structure & requirements, routes, credits, awards, levels, scheme modules.



^

Award outcomes


This award follows the structure identified for the Route. The award reflects a particular focus and ethos, as described further in this Award Programme Specification. The award sits in the Route currently developed as Health and Science.

This award is firmly based on the vocational and professional needs of students working in this field or wishing to progress in it. The award aims to develop learner’s knowledge-base, research skills and critical data analysis skills as well as their theoretical and conceptual understanding of the study of crime and social science. Assessment is planned to provide a broad base which allows access and progression for as wide a student group as possible, while at the same time preparing the students for progression to an Honours degree. Assessment methods are intended to address the learning outcomes while at the same time providing developmental stages within the students’ learning journey. Alternative assessment vehicles for resubmission are being considered for assessments which are time-limited such as practical reports.


Personal and Professional Development (PPD) modules in these awards have been developed which allow the learner to achieve the generic outcomes specified in these route core modules via an in-depth, multi-perspective study of crime in a chosen locality. In carrying out this study, learners will develop and evidence a range of the subject-specific criminology and ‘minor subject’ benchmark standards outlined above. They will also develop a high level of expertise in the criminality of their chosen location, and in the personal, private and public responses to it.


^ Award Structure

This award is one of four awards developed under the programme heading ‘Foundation Degrees in Criminology with Applied Social Science’. The structure of these awards reflects the aim of developing a multi-disciplinary perspective on the study of crime, whilst also facilitating a degree of specialisation to reflect learner’s differing progression and chosen articulation/employment routes.


Students on these four awards undertake a substantial common element of study. This consists of:


  • Route Core modules [x 8]:

    • These focus on Work-Based-Learning (WBL) and Personal and Professional Development (PPD) – and are contextualized to these awards so that their satisfactory completion will also allow students to develop and evidence a range of ‘discipline-specific skills’ identified in the QAA Benchmark Standards for criminology and the ‘minor subject’

  • Award Core modules [6]:

    • criminology [one at level 4; two at level 5]

    • one module each in sociology, psychology and law at Level 4, introducing that discipline and the study of crime from the perspective of that discipline



In addition to these core modules, students choose two level-5 “strand modules” from either sociology or psychology or law to determine their final award. Students wishing to pursue a Fd Criminology with Applied Social Science are required to choose their two L5 strand modules from two different strands


Level 4

Level 5

2 x Core PPD modules


2 x Core WBL modules


1 x Core module in each of:

Criminology

Psychology

Sociology

Law

2 x Core PPD modules


2 x Core WBL modules


2 x Core Criminology modules


2 x Strand modules in chosen minor subject – leading to ‘Fd Criminology with that minor subject’


It is anticipated that further (elective) modules will be devised as the award programme establishes itself and develops - but will be subject to minimum student numbers limit, and may be developed as online study modules if required to allow for local agencies and organisations requiring provision of a module for small groups of students.


^ FdA Criminology with APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCE: Course Structure


I

Certificate Stage: LEVEL 4: 120 CREDITS




Module Title

Credits

[1]

PPD 1: Learning and Reflective practice

15

[2]

PPD 2: Critical Thinking Skills

15

[3]

WBL 1: The agencies of the Criminal Justice System

15

[4]

WBL 2: External pressures on organisations

15

[5]

Criminology and the Social Sciences

15

[6]

Sociology and the study of Crime and Deviance

15

[7]

Law and Criminal Justice

15

[8]

Psychology and the study of Criminal Behaviour

15

II

Diploma stage: LEVEL 5; 120 CREDITS

[9]

PPD 3: Reflective and Reflexive Skills

15

[10]

PPD 4: Research Project

15

[11]

WBL 3: Inter-organisational Co-operation

15

[12]

WBL 4: Negotiated work-based project

15

[13]

Law Enforcement, Punishment and the State

15

[14]

Criminality and Victimisation in Modern Britain

15


^ Plus two modules, drawn from two of the three strands below:





Sociology




Psychology




Law

Credits

[15]

Equality and Diversity in Modern Britain?

[17]

Understanding Psychological Research

[19]

Criminal Law

15

[16]


Global Development and Everyday Life


[18]


Understanding the Individual


[20]

Justice and Accountability

15




^ 11 Student support

In order to provide a supportive learning environment, a wide range of academic and pastoral support will be made available to students. The precise form of support available to students registered on the Scheme's awards is set out below:

  • Information on admission and induction arrangements;

  • Academic guidance and tutorial support;

  • Work based mentors;

  • Pastoral and welfare support;

  • Careers information and guidance.



In addition the students on this award will be provided with an Award Handbook. Library facilities will form an important part of the provision. Students will be encouraged to use the books, journals and online resources of the College Library to assist with their study. Library staff are available to help and information literacy training will be provided. There is a HE study area within the Queens Gardens library and a dedicated HE librarian. Library stock is being updated continuously and a range of books suitable for this programme are already in stock or shortly to be purchased.

Students in full-time employment are expected to pursue the part-time Fd programme, and to attend on a two-half-day or one-half-day-and-one-evening basis. It is recognised that students benefit from an amount of cohort experience. This provides the opportunity for comparison and sharing of experiences and ideas as well as fulfilling a support function. For these reasons the course features regular attendance in the College and students will also be encouraged to establish informal learning sets which they will operate themselves.

It is acknowledged that the work based learning elements of the award programmes bring particular support needs. Although academic staff will support assessment and study fully, it is also anticipated that all learners will have a workplace mentor who will form an important part of the support mechanism. A handbook and training will be provided for the workplace mentors.

Part-time students will attend college at the beginning of their programme of study during which they will receive induction and will be familiarised with the course and its requirements. They will also be facilitated in the development of the cohort using a range of icebreaker and introduction techniques. Following this, students will attend the institution on a weekly basis. The exact arrangements will be subject to negotiation within the individual cohort.

Staff associated with the awards will negotiate and provide individual support through individual tutorials, meetings or other contact, which could also be carried out electronically.

Personal progress files will form an integrated part of the curriculum.

It is intended that the use of on-line learning will be developed along with the course to provide a range of on-line facilities to supplement and develop the teaching and assessment on the programme. Students will all receive accounts and access will be provided to enable them to draw upon all the on-line resources, via the College VLE, Moodle. It is anticipated that this will also assist in meeting the support requirements for students with learning problems.

Students will receive guidance with regard to progression to Level 3 study.


^ 12 Criteria for admission

This award subscribes to the admissions criteria and processes specified within the Scheme documentation.

The following minimum criteria are common to all University Foundation Degrees:

  • GCE/VCE Advanced Level and New Nationals. One 6-unit qualification at Advanced level, plus three other subjects at GCSE grade C or above.

  • National Certificate/Diploma or suitable bridging course in a qualification relevant to the course chosen.

  • SQA Advanced Highers. One band C Advanced Higher Pass plus three other subjects at standard grade (grade 3) or above.

  • International Baccalaureate. Award of the Certificate with a minimum of 20 points.

  • Irish Leaving Certificate. Three higher/honours passes at grade C

  • Access courses

The following qualifications are welcomed and will be taken into consideration by the Admissions Team, but may enable entry to the Scheme only in conjunction with other qualifications.


  • GNVQs/NVQs or other Level 3 vocational qualifications within the relevant QCA framework

  • City and Guilds qualifications at Level 3 or above

  • Advanced Modern Apprenticeships with Level 3 qualifications

Applicants are not necessarily expected to have formal qualifications. For example, they may have had appropriate work experience, paid, or unpaid. Students may be admitted to the Scheme on the basis of non-certificated learning. However, in the absence of formal learning qualifications, applications are welcomed from persons who can demonstrate relevant work experience, including work in a voluntary capacity. The Scheme actively supports claims for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) and Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).


All programmes of study are conducted and assessed in the English languages. Hence, applicants seeking admission to any Route may be required to provide evidence that they can communicate effectively in the English language, for example, by achieving a minimum of IELTS 6.0, or equivalent.


^ 13 Evaluation and improvement of quality and standards

The Scheme and its constituent routes and awards are managed and operated in accordance with College and University regulations and procedures. This will include representation and input from employers who will contribute to curriculum development and review. Reports will be made to the College and the University who will take appropriate action to continually enhance the Scheme and its awards.


^ 14 Regulations of assessment

The Scheme adopts in full the University Academic Principles and Regulations. Students will be provided with a copy of the University Student Assessment Regulations (a sub-set of the University Academic Regulations) at the point of registration for their award.

Any variation to the University Regulations or particular requirements for an award will be identified in award documents as appropriate.

Progression: Foundation degrees are a qualification in their own right but a key aim is that they encourage lifelong learning. Holders of the foundation degree may chose to progress their learning in a variety of ways and over different timescales, possibly seeking professional accreditation or further vocational or academic qualifications or new career opportunities. It is policy at Leeds Met that there are clearly identified progression routes from all foundation degrees to honours degree programmes. All awards within the Scheme will identify specific honours degree programmes for progression and learners will be offered the opportunity to contribute to the design of their qualification so that it meets their own organisation’s needs, whilst also maintaining the standard of the award. This will be facilitated through elements of personal and career development planning.

The honours degree options available at Leeds Met in the first instance are:

  • BA (Hons) Criminology

  • BA (Hons) Criminology & Psychology

  • BA (Hons) Criminology & Sociology

It is intended to write honours degree options to offer an alternative articulation route.

15 Indicators of programme quality

The Scheme has been developed through discussions with local employers and corporate clients, the outcomes of which indicated the requirement for a broad based qualification involving employer collaboration and input. These have been aligned closely with the QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications and subject benchmarks.

The Scheme framework enables new course provision to be developed in an effective and timely manner. The Scheme seeks to promote increased cost-effectiveness of delivery through shared core modules which are contextualised to specific regional, sector and organisational needs. Additionally, course management of the provision is simplified through the adoption of common procedures and regulations in areas such as admissions and assessment. It is subject to full external scrutiny.

The route adopts the quality indicators as defined by the scheme.


Specific Awards within the route will be evaluated against the following criteria:


^ Benchmark alignment:

The route and its constituent awards will be reviewed against appropriate benchmarks and professional frameworks.


Quality Improvement:

The route and its constituent awards will be subject to peer review as part of the College quality improvement processes.


^ Student perceptions

The route and its constituent awards will be subject to SPOC survey and evaluation. Student representation will be encouraged on all Award Committees, Route Committees, at a cross college Level and through student representation on HE Committee and College Council and Academic Board.


^ Recruitment Retention and Achievement

The route and its constituent awards will be measured against annually agreed college targets.

Industrial Contacts:

As with all vocational higher education programmes the programme team have taken care to engage employers and stakeholder groups representing a broad cross section of professionals within the sector.


The development team feel they have achieved a balance of skills and knowledge which genuinely reflect the needs and interests of employers and potential students within the locality.


Details of the programme have been discussed with appropriate staff from the following local employers and contacts:


Humberside Association of Neighbourhood Watch Groups

Humberside Police Authority

HMP Full Sutton


Details have also been sent to:


59 local agencies and organisations in the sector have been provided with details of the programmes



^ MODULE SPECIFICATION


MODULE TITLE: Personal and Professional Development 1


MODULE CODE:


SUBJECT CODE / COST CENTRE:


LEVEL / CREDIT: Level 1 HE (Level 4 NQF) 15 Credit Points

VERSION / DATE: Sept 2010


^ SPONSORING SCHEME: Hull College Higher Education Scheme

PRE-REQUISITES: None


AIMS:

The purpose of this module is to enable the student to acquire and develop a range of skills including transferable, personal, interpersonal, academic and subject specific skills that will enable them to succeed in Criminology. This module is part of a series of Personal and Professional Development modules that progressively develops the student as they move through the levels of study.


Subject specific skills are identified through reference to the relevant sector frameworks which are applied to the generic skill outcomes for the level. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their learning and gain credit through that reflection.


This module is focused on the individual’s personal and career development needs. It supports the student in identifying their initial level of competence, through the use of a range of diagnostic tools, and the level of competence they should aim to achieve by completion of the module.


^ LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this level 1 (Certificate) module students will be able to:

LO1 evaluate different approaches to learning and the resolution of problems.


LO2 choose and apply an appropriate range of skills, techniques and methods of practice common to the relevant skills sector.


LO3 show clear and effective communication skills on well defined topics.


LO4 demonstrate self awareness and the use of reflection to support continuing professional development.


^ INDICATIVE CONTENT:

A range of opportunities will be presented to students. Appropriate activities will be selected that will support the tracking and monitoring of their development. To include:

  • Introduction to personal and professional development tools and techniques.

  • Personal and professional development approaches in informing career planning.

  • Diagnostic tools to assess current skillset and identification of future needs.

  • Development of study skills including communication skills, problem solving, team working and approaches to learning.


^ LEARNING STRATEGIES:

This module will draw on a wide range of learning and teaching methods appropriate to the nature of the student profile. The specific methods to be used in each instance of delivery will be determined at an annual planning event, and the outcomes recorded on a standard chart to be included in relevant route / award documentation


^ ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES:

A range of assessment methods is used within the module aiming towards achieving deep learning where knowledge is developed through both understanding and application. Both the task and the assessment criteria will be clearly explained to students within a module outline, or an assignment brief.

Methods may include practice-based assignments, case studies, presentations, multi-cultural management problems, projects, problem-based scenarios, simulations, portfolios, reflective assignments and the outcomes of negotiated learning contracts.

The assessment methods will enable the student to provide evidence which

clearly satisfies the Intended Learning Outcomes for this module.


The assessment methods will be reviewed at the Annual Planning Event and the outcomes published annually in the student and/or module handbook.


Reflective Portfolio (100%) to include evaluation of learning skills, critical evaluation of journal article/textbook chapter, reflection on models of learning, and entries from a reflective log.

^ KEY/TRANSFERABLE SKILLS DEVELOPED AND/OR ASSESSED IN THE MODULE:


Key Skill

Developed: Y?

Assessed: Y?

Communication

Y

Y

Working with others

Y

Y

Management skills

Y




Application of number

Y




Information Technology

Y




Problem solving

Y

Y

Improving own learning and performance

Y

Y

Employability

Y





^ INDICATIVE SOURCES:

Book lists and reference resources will be located in module handbooks and updated annually (amendments confirmed at the Annual Planning Event).


APPENDICES:


Assessment methods map


Key Skills Development map


Key Skills Assessment map


Foundation Degree Criminology with Applied Social Science


^ ASSESSMENT METHODS MAP:


MODULES


^ ASSESSMENT METHODS

PPD 1

PPD 2

WBL 1

WBL 2

Criminology & ….

Sociology & ….

Law and …

Understanding Human ….

PPD 3

PPD 4

WBL 3

WBL 4

Criminality & Victimisation…

Enforcement …& the State

Issues of E & D

Global Development & ..

…Psychological research

Understanding the inidivid..

Criminal law

Justice and ….







01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20




Report


























Y

Y

Y

Y













Y













Essay





Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y




Y

Y

Y




Practical report
































































Oral Presentation






















Y

Y

























Y










Case study assignment
































































Reflective Log







Y

Y




















































Portfolio


Y





























































Written assignment questions

































































Foundation Degree Criminology with Applied Social Science


^ KEY SKILLS DEVELOPMENT MAP:


^ MODULES


Key skills

PPD 1

PPD 2

WRL1

WRL 2

Criminology & ….

Sociology & ….

Law and …

Understanding Human ….

PPD 3

PPD 4

WRL 3

WRL 4

Criminality & Victimisation…

Enforcement …& the State

Issues of E & D

Global Development & ..

…Psychological research

Understanding the inidivid..

Criminal law

Justice and ….







01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20




Communication

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y




Communication

Y

Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y




























Working with others

Y

Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y




























Management skills

Y

Y







Y










Y

Y




Y

Y




Y




Y













Application of number

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y




Information Technology

Y

Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y




























Problem solving

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y




Improving own learning and performance

Y

Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y




























Employability

Y




Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y





























Foundation Degree Criminology with Applied Social Science


^ KEY SKILLS ASSESSMENT MAP:


^ MODULES


Key skills

PPD 1

PPD 2

WRL 1

WRL 2

Criminology & ….

Sociology & ….

Law and …

Understanding Human ….

PPD 3

PPD 4

WRL 3

WRL 4

Criminality & Victimisation…

Enforcement …& the State

Issues of E & D

Global Development & ..

…Psychological research

Understanding the inidivid..

Criminal law

Justice and ….







01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20




Communication

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y




Communication

Y

Y



















Y

Y

Y

Y




























Working with others




Y

Y

Y
















Y

Y

Y




























Management skills













Y













Y







Y




Y




Y













Application of number







Y

Y




















































Information Technology

Y

Y

Y
















Y

Y

Y

Y




























Problem solving

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y




Improving own learning and performance




Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y




























Employability

Y

Y

Y

Y













Y

Y

Y

Y






























Sept 2010





Download 305.67 Kb.
leave a comment
Date conversion24.10.2013
Size305.67 Kb.
TypeДокументы, Educational materials
Add document to your blog or website

Be the first user to rate this..
Your rate:
Place this button on your site:
docs.exdat.com

The database is protected by copyright ©exdat 2000-2017
При копировании материала укажите ссылку
send message
Documents

upload
Documents

Рейтинг@Mail.ru
наверх