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Ucla school of public policy and social research


UCLA

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY AND SOCIAL RESEARCH

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE


ADVANCED DIRECT PRACTICE WITH

CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS AND FAMILIES

Spring 2005

231 C # 4


M. K. Oliveri, LCSW, Diplomate in Clinical Social Work, Assistant Clinical Professor


PURPOSE OF THE COURSE


The overall purpose of this course is to expose the advanced direct practice student specializing in child, adolescent, and family practice to theory, technique, research, and critical analysis of one’s own and fellow students clinical experience with child, adolescent and family cases encountered in a variety of agency-based practice settings. Students will be presented with advanced theory, methods and research in child, adolescent and family clinical social work practice which build upon the theories and methods presented in the first year 230 practice classes, the second year 231 family and groups class, the 201 and 202 human behavior and psychopathology classes that span the first and second year, in addition to other relevant academic and field experiences. By the end of this course, students will be able to elucidate an integrated theoretical base of practice with associated practice methods to utilize toward their post-graduate Social Work practice with children, adolescents and families. In addition, the focus of this class will be on early attachment relationships and life experiences with conflicts, loss, and trauma. As such, students taking this course will learn about how to work with the relationship issues which may first present in childhood and effect a person throughout their life or in their own intimate and family relationships as an adult. Students will be helped to understand the strengths and limitations of their foundation for practice with this population, the adaptations that may be required by the unique circumstances of a child or family’s life, culture and community, and the effect of limited service resources for this population. Finally, the student involved in this course will be able to identify some of the ways in which they might insure continued growth, development, and change in their practice base as they gather experience and continue to engage in keeping pace with the increasing knowledge, research, and ever-shifting policy initiatives effecting social work practice with children, adolescents and their families.


In order to accomplish the above, students will be exposed to a variety of reading, research, clinical case material, critical thinking and discussions which will include attention to child, adolescent and family practice issues which emerge in agency based practice from a bio-psycho-social or eco-systemic perspective. Students will review and expand upon the contributions of Psychodynamic Theories like Object Relations and Self Psychology, Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories, Systems Theory as it applies to family and group work, Existential Psychotherapy Models, and the Problem Solving Approach to Social Work practice with children and adolescents. Students will develop an understanding for the theories of development which guide intervention with this population. These theories or models are represented by such concepts as temperament, attachment, resilience, reciprocity in human relatedness and growth, social support, separation, individuation, trauma, and loss. In addition, students will be asked to consider the role importance of extended family, peer groups, community groups, community organizations, public policy, and such factors as age, sexual orientation, SES, culture, ethnicity, disabilities, and other unique circumstances that affect the type and quality of life that a given child, adolescent or family might experience. Students will use this review and expansion of theory, methods, individual, family and group circumstances to advance their understanding of the client worker relationship, ability to develop and sustain this relationship with complex child and family cases, and use this relationship in the collaborative process necessary to assess, form treatment plans and interventions with the child, family, and other professionals critical to the child’s family, social, academic, and physical world. Special attention will be given to the importance in child, adolescent and family work to the use of non-verbal or alternative communication and intervention methods such as the use of play interactions, art, games, physical activities, enactments, other structured activities, and developmentally appropriate interview techniques. And, finally, the student will be encouraged to link their thinking about this special population group back to the theory, practice dimensions, research, values, and ethics of the general practice of social work.


^ COURSE STRUCTURE


This course will be run as an advanced seminar course, in which the professor will provide focused lecture and reading materials and in which the students will be participating class members, occasional teaching assistants and self-directed learners. Each class will be divided into two parts, beginning with a structured lecture and open discussion of the daily topic and readings, and, ending with individual or group, case or population based presentations to be arranged. The schedule for the later will be finalized during the first two weeks of class. There are stimulus readings available throughout the bibliography for students to use in these case-based or population-based student presentation portions of the class. There are some particularly focused readings in the last section of the bibliography (Special Issues and Populations). Additional readings can be provided by the instructor, and students are encouraged to seek and share reading material that they discover on their own.


Since this class will be a seminar based on mutual and shared learning, it will be important for class members to attend on a very regular basis and to participate fully in class discussions, presentations, and readings. In addition, students will need to bring an attitude of openness to the learning process, mutual respect, acceptance of differences in opinions and experience, a willingness to think about and to evaluate one’s own and others positions in light of case-based and research data relevant to child, adolescent and family social work practice.


^ COURSE REQUIREMENTS

--Class Participation 20% (noted each week)

--Abstract of One or Two Readings assigned by the professor (# of readings depends on size of the class) 20% (10% for each abstract if there are two), posted on web for class.

--Class Presentation and Case Write-up 30% (case write-up to be posted on web the Thursday/Friday before in-class presentation of the case).

--Final Paper or Project 30% (due class day of finals week). Class will meet during finals week in order to insure enough time for student presentations.


^ Participation and attendance: Meaningful class discussion and regular class attendance is expected of each student in this advanced practice class. Un-excused absences and non-participation will result in a grade reduction.


Late assignment policy: It is expected that all assignments will be submitted on time. Grades will be reduced on late submissions.


^ COURSE OUTLINE


NOTE: The required reading is actually an expectation that each student will read a minimum of 3 selections from each of the relevant sections of the bibliography. Students will be assigned 1or 2 readings to abstract for the class during the course. Students are expected to read an additional selection or two from the Special Issues or Populations section when they are presenting. Students may substitute other readings during their presentation with the instructors consent and with a willingness to share appropriate citations and abstracts with the class during their presentation.


RECOMMENDED BOOK PURCHASES if you are interested*


Allen-Meares, Paula. (1995). Social Work with Children and Adolescents. New York: Longman Publishers.


Ammerman, R. and Hersen M. (1997). ^ Handbook of Prevention and Treatment with

Children and Adolescents: Intervention in the Real World. John Wiley and Sons.


Boik Labovitz, Barbara and Goodwin, Anna E. (2000). Sandplay Therapy: A Step By

Step Manual for Psychotherapists of Diverse Orientations. New York: W.W. Norton and Co.


Boyd-Webb, N. (2003). ^ Social Work Practice with Children. Guilford Press.


Bromfield, Richard. (1992). Playing for Real: The World of A Child Therapist. New

York: Penguin, Dutton Book.


Chicchetti, D. and Toth, S. (1998). Developmental Perspectives on Trauma: the

Rochester Symposium. University of Rochester Press.


Davis Fishman, Kathrine. (1995). Behind the One-Way Mirror: Psychotherapy and

Children. Batam Books.


Fatout, M. F. (1996). ^ Children in Group’s: A Social Work Perspective. Auburn House

Pub.


Fawcett, M. (1996). Learning Through Child Observation. Jessica Kingsley Pub.


Fraser, M. (1997). Risk and Resilience in Childhood: An Ecological Perspective.

NASW Press.


Herman, Judith Lewis. (1997). ^ Trauma and Recovery: The aftermath of violence from

domestic abuse to political terror. Basic Books.


Howe, D (ed). (1996). Attachment and Loss in Child and Family Social Work. Avebury

Press.


Kaplan, Louise. (1978). Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual. New York: A Touchstone Book.


Malchiodi, Cathy A. (1998). ^ Understanding Children’s Drawings. New York: The Guilford Press.


Malekoff, A. (1997). Group Work with Adolescents. Guilford Press.


Mash, E. and Barkley, R. (1998). Treatment of Childhood Disorders. Guilford Press.


McMahon, Linnett. (1992). ^ The Handbook of Play Therapy. New York: Rutledge.


Miller, Alice. (1981). The Drama of the Gifted Child: The Search for the True Self (Originally published as Prisoners of Childhood). Basic Books.


O’Connor, Kevin J. (1991). The Play Therapy Primer: An Integration of Theories and Techniques. New York: John Wiley and Sons.


Schaffer, Charles E., (ed). (1993). ^ The Therapeutic Powers of Play. New Jersey, Jason Aronson.


Siegel, Daniel J. (1999). The Developing Mind: Toward a Neurobiology of

Interpersonal Experience. New York: The Guilford Press.


Winnicott, D.W. (1971). Playing and Reality. New York: Routledge.


READINGS: There will be a course reader that covers general issues in child and adolescent treatment. We will place on the web the readings from the first week, including the Bloom article. In addition, on the web will be the readings from the Psychodynamic/Object Relations/Self Psychology tradition that were made into a reader last year. Some of your assigned readings for class abstracts will come from these web-based readings and some will come from the reader. And, there will be some readings on reserve in the CalSWEC office for those of you interested in particular topics.


WEEK #1: Introduction to the Course and ‘Real-life’ Child and Family Case Presentation from Clinical Social Work Practice.

-Overview of the course, objectives, and assignments.

-Review and discussion of theories, methods, and clinical models utilized for intervention with children, adolescents and their families. A particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the collaborative process with primary caretakers and others in child and adolescent work.

-Review and discussion of the legal and ethical dilemmas in the treatment of children and adolescents when collaboration with others is so critical. Discussion will focus upon: confidentiality; the limits to confidentiality when the parent or the court holds the privilege and consent for a child; when a young adolescent may seek their own treatment and under what conditions; child abuse reporting and the conflicts inherent in the law and dating practices of teenagers in this nation; the struggle for clinicians regarding their role as advocates for children and families and the manner in which conflicts emerge regarding the ‘best interest’ of the child, the parent, the school, the agency which employs the social worker.

-Defining the population of children, adolescents and their families who are at risk for or who are referred for social work interventions. A review, discussion, and synthesis of prevalence findings for emotional disturbance, learning problems, drug and alcohol use, exposure to violence, family membership and guardianship, encounters with loss through divorce, illness, or death of family members and the impact these conditions have on the adaptation and functioning of children and families will be discussed.

-Consider the importance of an ecological perspective for organizing theory and methods of understanding and intervening in the lives of children and families. Review the way in which Psychodynamic, Behavioral, Systems, and Existential Theories of intervention are applicable to the child and family population. Delineate the critical issues, measures, and use of alternative sources in addition to the evaluation of the child in the assessment of a given child or adolescent’s strengths and vulnerabilities.

-A child and family case from the professors practice will be utilized to illustrate the above or a film or both.


Required for all to read (on the web)

Klein, Waldo C., and Bloom, Martin. (1995). “Practice Wisdom.” Social Work: Vol. 40, #6, November, pg. 799-807.


In Reader:

Chicchetti, D. and Toth, S. (1998). Developmental Perspectives on Trauma: the Rochester Symposium. University of Rochester Press.

Chap. 5: Gabarino, James. “Growing Up in a Socially Toxic Environment,” p. 141-54.

Chap. 3: Downey, G. and Khouri, H. and Feldman, S. “Early Interpersonal Trauma and Later Adjustment: The Mediational Role of Rejection Sensitivity,” p. 85-114.

Webb, Nancy Boyd. (2003). Social Work Practice With Children. New York: Guilford

Press.

Chap. 1: “Children’s Problems and Needs,” p. 3-15.

Chap. 2: “Necessary Background for Helping Children,” p. 16-35.

Chap. 3: “Building Relationships with all Relevant Systems,” p. 39-56.

Cassidy, J. and Shaver, P. (1999). Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 2: Kobak, R. “The Emotional Dynamics of Disruptions in Attachment Relationships,” p. 21-43.

Chap. 23: Lyons-Ruth, K. and Jacobvitz, D. “Attachment Disorganization: Unresolved Loss, Relational Violence, and Lapses in Behavioral and Attentional Strategies,” p. 520-554.

Chap. 31: van Ijzendoorn, M. and Sagi, A. “Cross-Cultural Patterns of Attachment: Universal and Contextual Dimensions,” p. 713-734.


On Web or in Reserve box in CalSWEC office:

LeCroy, Craig Winston and Ashford, Jose B. ( 1992). “Children’s mental health:

Current findings and research directions.” Buttrick, Shirley M. (Ed). ^ Research on Children: Reprinted from, Social Work Research and Abstracts: Vol. 28, #1, March. Washington D.C.: NASW Press, pg 14-24.

Armstrong, Mary I., and Huz, Steven, and Evans, Mary E. (1992). “What works for

whom: The design and evaluation of children’s mental health services.” Buttrick, Shirley M. (Ed). ^ Research on Children: Reprinted from, Social Work Research and Abstracts: Vol. 28, #1, March. Washington D.C.: NASW Press, pg. 44-52.

Hibbs, Euthymia D. and Jensen, Peter S. (1996). Psychosocial Treatment for Child and Adolescent Disorders: Empirically Based Strategies for Clinical Practice.

Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Chap. 2: Kazdin, Alan E. “Developing Effective Treatments for Children and Adolescents,” pg. 9-18.

Petr, Christopher G. and Spano, Richard N. (1990). “Evolution of Social Services for

Children with Emotional Disorders.” Social Work: Vol. 35,#3, May, pg. 228-234.

Early, Theresa and Poertner, John. (1993). “Families with Children with Emotional

Disorders: A Review of the Literature.” Social Work: Vol. 38, #6, November, pg. 743-64.

Trupin, Eric W., Tarico, Valerie S., Low, Benson, P., Jemelka, Ron, and McClellan, Jack. (1993). “Children on Child Protective Service Caseloads: Prevalence and Nature

of Serious Emotional Disturbance.” Child Abuse and Neglect: Vol. 17, pg. 345-55.

Collins, Barbara and Collins, Thomas. (1990). “Parent-Professional Relationships in the Treatment of Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children and Adolescents.” Social

Work: Vol. 35, #6, November, pg. 522-527.

Wodarski, John S. and Kurtz, David P. and Gaudin, James, M., and Howing, Phyllis T.

(1990). “Maltreatment and the School-Age Child: Major Academic, Socioemotional, and Adaptive Outcomes.” ^ Social Work: Vol. 35, #6, November, pg. 506-513.

Allen-Meares, Paula. (1995) Chap. 4: E. Segal, “An Overview and Critique of Public

Policies and Practices.

Chap. 12: V. Hodges and B. Blythe, “Evaluating Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents.

WEEK #2: Temperament and Reciprocity with Care-Givers in the Life of a Child


-Continue with a discussion of last weeks issues and case example. A particular emphasis will be placed upon students fully understanding in an advanced way assessment techniques and procedures first encountered in field placement and in child psychopathology class. The use of observation, sampling of various types of behavior, techniques for interviewing children at different ages, the use of tests and measures with the school aged child and adolescent, interviews with parents and teachers, the use of tests and measures with parents and teachers, and gathering information from other sources will all be explored.

-Review and expand upon the important theories of early child development that are particularly important to the assessment and intervention process with children, adolescents and their families. The theoretical and research literature from ‘temperament’ and ‘goodness of fit’ between parents and children will be the primary focus of this discussion.

- Lecture, readings and discussion will focus on the importance of defining and understanding the persistence of temperamental features across the life span. Consideration will be give to the way in which social interaction can support or inhibit the child developing flexible adaptations or rigid ones relevant to their temperamental style. The easy child, the difficult child, the slow-to-warm-up child and factors related to persistence, distractibility, and activity level will each be explored.

-The importance of the above factors and ‘goodness of fit’ between the parent and child will be addressed as key contributors to the assessment and intervention process in social work practice. These factors contribute to the relative strengths or difficulties between the child, parent, and significant others that will be a focus of the treatment process. In addition, the child and parent will enact these interactional styles with the social work professional. This enactment will allow the clinician critical opportunities for understanding, planning, and intervening with the child and family to support strengths and to minimize vulnerabilities connected to life-long temperamental factors.

-Regulatory Disorders of Infants and Toddlers are prime examples of the types of problems parents will consult social workers about that are tied to issues of temperament and fit. Methods for assessing and intervening with these difficulties will be explored in class. The principle interventions may be with parents rather than directly with the child when these struggles are present. So the role of parents as primary recipients of treatment, parents as allies, and parents as lay therapists will be explored.


On Web or in Reader (* indicates in reader from 202B)

Kaplan, Louise, J. (1995) “The Human Dialogue.” In, ^ No Voice Is Ever Wholly Lost.

New York: Simon and Schuster, pg. 13-27.

Fraiberg, Selma H. (1959). The Magic Years: Understanding and Handling the

Problems of Early Childhood. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.

Chap. 1: “All About Witches, Ogres, Tigers, and Mental Health,” pg. 3-31.

Chap. 2: “Shake Off Slumber, and Beware...,” pg 35-67.

Winnicott, D. W. (1971). Playing and Reality. London and New York:

Tavistock/Routledge.

Chap. 3: “Playing: A Theoretical Statement,” pg. 38-52.

Chess, Stella and Thomas, Alexander. (1986). Temperament in Clinical Practice. New

York: The Guilford Press.

Chap. 1: “The Significance of Temperament,” pg. 3-10.*

Chap. 2: “Goodness of Fit: Control and Mastery versus the Controlling Parent or

Child,” pg. 11-23.*

Chap. 3: “Parental Reactions to the Child’s Temperament,” pg. 24-43.*

Chap. 4: “Temperament in Infancy,” pg 44-57.

Chap. 10: “Prevention and Treatment: General Considerations,” pg 148-157.

Chap. 11: “Parent Guidance,” pg 159-191.

Chap. 12: “Direct Treatment of Child and Adult,” pg 192-204.

Cicchetti, D. and Beeghly, M., (eds.). (1990). The Self in Transition Infancy to

Childhood. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chap 3: Emde, R. and Buchsbaum, H. “‘Didn’t You Hear My Mommy?’ Autonomy with Connectedness in Moral Self Emergence.” p. 35-59.

Chap 7: Meltzoff, A. “Foundations for Developing a Concept of Self: The Role of Imitation in Relating Self to Other and the Value of Social Mirroring, Social Modeling and Self Practice in Infancy,” p. 139-164.

Chap 12: Watson, M. “Aspects of Self Development as Reflected in Children’s Role

Malchiodi, Cathy A. (1998). Understanding Children’s Drawings. New York: The Guilford Press.

Chap. 2, ‘Children’s Drawings in context,’ pgs, 19-40.

Chap. 3, ‘Working with Children and Their Drawings,’ pgs 41-63.


^ TOPICS FOR WEEKS 3-11 (these will be ordered depending on the speakers, finalized later this week)


List of Speakers Could Include:

-Judith Rothman, MSW, LCSW on Attachment throughout the life course

-Ellen Kimmel, MSW, LCSW on Attachment and Intensive Treatment of Adolescent Girls in Residential Treatment

-Yoshi Matsushima, MSW, LCSW on Sand-tray Work with Children and Adults

-Patric White MSW, LCSW, PhD Working with Children and Adolescents in their Schools

-Judith Wolff, MSW, LCSW on Narrative Therapy

-Steve Lawrence, MD on Psychotropic Medication with Children and Adolescents

-Charles Coverdale, MSW, LCSW, PhD on Therapists Use of Self, Transference and Counter-transference, and Making Decisions about Boundaries


-CONTRIBUTIONS FROM PSYCHODYNAMIC THEORY toward clinical work with children, adolescents and their families.


-CONTRIBUTIONS FROM OBJECT-RELATIONS AND SELF PSYCHOLOGY toward clinical work with children, adolescents and their families.


-RESILIENCE and how to enhance in through the therapeutic process with kids and families.


-ATTACHMENT, INDIVIDUATION, and LOSS, working with these core issues in clinical practice with children, adolescents and their families.


-THE THERAPEUTIC USE OF SELF, transference and counter-transference in the psychotherapy of children, adolescents and their families.


-SPECIAL ISSUES, the importance of utilizing play therapy models, sand-tray approaches, narrative approaches, family therapy, work with collaterals (parents, teachers, pediatricians, DCFS workers, etc) when working with children and adolescents.


-INTEGRATED PRACTICE, ( the importance of utilizing multiple models or systems of practice, such as, psychodynamic, behavioral, and systemic models) while working individually or in groups with children, adolescents, their families, educational and other mental health, welfare, or health-care providers.


MULTI-SYSTEMIC INTERVENTION, a new name for Social Work Practice with children or adolescents, the natural systems in which they are involved, and expanding these systems to include those that might be needed; kids live with parents, sibs, neighborhoods, schools, teachers, classmates, administrators and community networks which might include law enforcement, protective services, medical or psychiatric intervention, mental health, substance abuse, vocational, or other systems of care.


231C Assignment

Class Presentation of Cases


Guidelines for Presentations


--Case write-ups are to be in 202B format or in narrative format covering the same material (for example slightly expanded forms (3-5 pgs) of the vignettes used for 202B exam cases). If you are presenting an individual child or adolescent case, the more comprehensive format is advised. If you are presenting an adult case or cases for a panel discussion of a topic or an issue then the narrative format is advised.

--You will need to make corrections if using your 202B case consistent with the feedback you received on this write-up or your new thinking about the case.

--You will need to add an alive but brief description of the treatment process (see below for outline). In your write-ups, do a pertinent and brief summary of type, length, and key treatment issues as well as progress or lack of progress in treatment.

--Most of the detail of your treatment piece will be presented in class and not in the write-up, particularly if you are presenting an individual case vs a panel discussion.

--Post your cases on the web Thursday or Friday at the latest prior to the Tuesday that you are to present.

--Remember, I need to try and get the information to the guest consultants if they are to be best utilized, they do not all have internet access.

--Class members, consultants, and the professor will all be under the same confidentiality understandings that we would engage in if we were working in the same agency or practice. In class you can use your clients first name and reference actual descriptive material, ie school district).

--However, although the web page is restricted access, remember to use initials for names in the case, leave out specific school district reference, and name the case for the web using your first initial and last name as the prompt.

--Presentations will be 20 minutes in length and discussions will be 20 minutes per case.

--EVERYONE is to have read the cases posted on the web prior to the class presentation.

--As a presenter, you will need to let us know what your principle question or struggle is on the case.

--Even if you feel you are presenting a ‘successful’ treatment case, there will be ?’s or issues for the class to consider.

--Sometimes the best learning is from the ‘unsuccessful’ case or set of issues on a case.

--The richness for the presenter and for the class will come from the willingness on each person’s part to take a risk to share something openly with the others about the difficulties we each encounter while doing clinical work.

--In your class presentation you will briefly summarize the background material on your case (thinking of key points related to treatment questions or to the 1-2 page summaries used for 202B exam prep cases when you summarize). Remember, it is up to each of us to take seriously the responsibility to read your case before class, so you will not need to re-present all of the material in your written case presentation.

--Focus your presentation on ‘bringing to life’ the treatment relationship and dynamics. Be prepared to share snapshots or vignettes of the interaction between you and the client with the class. Demonstrations of play sequences, sharing of art material or games used, etc., will all help with this.

--The cases you present will be ‘compelling,’ so the brief time for discussion will be frustrating for each of us in different ways and rewarding to our growth and development in different ways. If any class member, consultant, or presenter would like to continue to discuss the case in some way with one of the others present this would be encouraged. Each of us will need to respect the others input as valid and meaningful. Disagreements on cases can be quite useful as they often reflect something of importance about the treatment process or issues. When considering further discussion outside of class on anyone’s case, it remains important to respect the others willingness to participate and their unique reflections.

--I look forward to sharing in this process of case consultation and collaboration with each of you, with all of you…MKO


231 C Article Assignments and Summaries


Note for writing up assigned reading:


You will be assigned one or two readings by the professor. You are to read these, write a brief abstract of the reading, summarize and define the key concepts, the clinical intervention strategy or meaning of the article to clinical work with children, adolescents, families, or with the early childhood issues in adult cases. You will post your summaries on the web, to share with other students.


Remember, you are to present the key points are elements in the reading. This will include definitions of key concepts, a summary of important clinical actions and interventions, or the presentation of critical research information depending on the article or chapter. Think of what would be useful for the class to know. You do not need to summarize everything, just those aspects of the chapter that you think are critical to understanding at this point. Conclude your write-up with critical thinking of your own on the ways in which the material is beneficial and also the limitations of the material in terms of its use in the therapeutic process for kids and families.


231C/202 B CASE ASSESSMENT ASSIGNMENT FORMAT

Asst.Clinical Prof. M. K. Oliveri
^

CHILD/ADOLESCENT BIO-PSYCHO-SOCIAL ASSESSMENT


Based upon AB3632/882 Department of Mental Health Assessment Format


I: BACKGROUND INFORMATION


STUDENT:


BIRTHDATE:


GUARDIAN: PRIMARY LANGUAGE:


ETHNICITY: ^ PRIMARY LANGUAGE:


HEALTH STATUS: It is very important to note current physical status and any present, chronic, or significant issues with regard to physical health past or present that could be effecting present adjustment.


HANDICAPPING CONDITION:

(for example, Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) in which the primary reasons for difficulties in the academic, behavioral, social, and emotional demands of school are based upon: a diagnosable emotional disturbance; that has persisted over 6 months or longer; and is intense enough to disrupt learning in one or more of the areas listed above; to the extent the child exhibits a delay of 18mths to 2yrs in progress expected by the child's general level of abilities. Other Educational Handicapping Conditions may include Learning Handicap, Speech and Language Handicap, Developmentally Delayed, Hearing Impaired, Visually Impaired, Other Health Impairments. Each School District may use slightly different labels and determines exact definitions within the ‘severe,’‘persistent,’ and 18-24 month delay based on measured ability.)


^ SCHOOL DISTRICT:


EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT & SERVICES:


ASSESSORS:


REASONS FOR ASSESSMENT:


RECORDS REVIEWED:


ASSESSMENT CONTACTS: (IN THIS CASE RELATIONSHIP TO CHILD, TYPES AND PERSONS USED AS DATA SOURCES)


^ II: PRESENTING PROBLEM


STATEMENT OF THE PRESENTING PROBLEM: (FROM THE CHILD, PARENT/GUARDIAN, TEACHER, PEDIATRICIAN, CONSULTING CLINICIANS AND TREATING CLINICIANS POINT OF VIEW AS APPLICABLE TO YOUR CASE. USE DIRECT QUOTES OR SUMMATIVE PARAPHRASE IF POSSIBLE.)


^ HISTORY OF THE PRESENTING PROBLEM: (THIS IS WHERE YOU PUT BEHAVIORAL DESCRIPTIONS, INTENSITY, FREQUENCY, DURATION, ANTECEDENT EVENTS, CONSEQUENCES OF ACTION, etc.)


III: RELEVANT HISTORY


BIRTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL HISTORY: INCLUDE STATEMENTS ABOUT THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF CONCEPTION; QUALITY OF PRENATAL CARE AND SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS; DESCRIBE THE BIRTH PROCESS AND OUTCOME INCLUDING BIRTH WEIGHT/LENGTH/APGARS IF KNOWN; PROVIDE PARENTS DESCRIPTION OF TEMPERAMENT (easy baby, difficult baby, slow to respond to connection or comfort, and other factors related to temperament); PROVIDE PARENTS DESCRIPTION OF ATTACHMENT BEHAVIORS (bonding at birth, attachment at 3 mths, 6 mths, 12 mths, and 18-22mth separation phase, and post this phase are important if the information is available)PRESENT DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES (social smile, grabbing, use of first word, sitting, crawling, walking, talking, toilet training, self identification, parallel play, empathic responding to another, role taking play, sharing with others, etc.); AND DESCRIBE THE OVERALL PROCESS OF DEVELOPMENT; BE SURE TO INCLUDE DEVELOPMENTAL COURSE, ie, PROGRESSIVE, REGRESSIVE or DELAYED DEVELOPMENTAL RESPONSES. AND FINALLY, DESCRIBE CARETAKERS CIRCUMSTANCES, FOR EXAMPLE, ANY POST PARTUM DEPRESSION, PHYSICAL ILLNESSES, SEPARATIONS, CHANGES IN CARETAKERS, DRUG USE, ETC. WHEN INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE FROM OTHER CARETAKERS, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATORS, PEDIATRICIANS OR OTHERS PARTICULARLY ABOUT TEMPERAMENT, ATTACHMENT, AND PRIMARY CARETAKERS RESPONSE PLEASE INDICATE IT AS WELL.


^ EDUCATIONAL HISTORY:


FAMILY DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY:


MEDICAL HISTORY:


MENTAL HEALTH HISTORY: (INCLUDE CONDITIONS IN FAMILY AND TREATMENT HISTORY IN THIS SECTION)


PROTECTIVE SERVICE HISTORY:


^ SUBSTANCE USE HISTORY:


III: INTERVIEW WITH THE CHILD/ADOLESCENT (SUMMATIVE FOR ON-GOING CASES.)


MENTAL STATUS EXAM:


Appearance:


Behavior:


Affect:


Mood:


Thought Processes and Content:


Intellect, Attention, and Cognition:


Coping and Defensive Strategies:


Suicidal/Homicidal Status:


Insight/Judgement:


^ DESCRIPTION OF THE CHILD/ADOLESCENT: (INCLUDE HERE THEMES, HOPES, WISHES, FUTURE PLANS, EXAMPLES OF INTERACTION WHICH BRING THE CHILD/ADOLESCENT TO LIFE FOR THE READER. DESCRIBE AND EMPHASIZE THE CHILD/ADOLESCENTS THOUGHTS, UNDERSTANDINGS, SELF STATED MEANINGS, AND AFFECTIVE RESPONSES USING HIS/HER WORDS. DESCRIBE DRAWINGS, PLAY, OR OTHER INTERACTIONS AND INCLUDE THE CHILD/ADOLESCENT’S INTERPRETATIONS.)


^ QUALITY OF FAMILY INTERACTIONS:


QUALITY OF PEER INTERACTIONS:


OTHER IMPORTANT RELATIONSHIP INTERACTIONS:

SOURCES OF STRENGTH/RESOURCES:


SOURCES OF STRESS/VULNERABILITY:


IV: DSM-IV: PROVISIONAL or WORKING DIAGNOSIS


AXIS I: Primary

Secondary

R/O


AXIS II


AXIS III


AXIS IV


AXIS V

CGASF


^ V: DIAGNOSTIC SUMMARY AND INTERPRETATION:

231C WRITE-UPS CAN BE BRIEF HERE, REFERENCING DIAGNOSTIC CONCERNS ONLY. THE BULK OF YOUR SUMMATIVE STATEMENTS OR CONCERNS CAN GO AFTER THE TREATMENT SUMMARY.


VI: BRIEF TREATMENT SUMMARY (who have you seen; how often; what theories, methods or models have been used; how has the child progressed or regressed over the course of treatment; how have others contributed to the child’s ups and downs; give a description of your relationship with the child or others that is VERY brief, as you will be bringing this alive in the class presentation by going into detail or depth)


^ DESCRIPTION OF TREATMENT INTERVENTIONS TO DATE:


CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THESE INTERVENTIONS FOR THE CHILD:


CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THESE INTERVENTIONS FOR THE FAMILY:


CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THESE INTERVENTIONS FOR THE THERAPIST:


^ VII: SUMMARY AND QUESTIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FUTURE


NOTE: Your critical analysis should include an assessment of behavioral, interactive, and functional changes on the part of the child and the family as they relate to the presenting problem. Include here a discussion of the strengths and limitations of the child, the family, the therapist’s relationship with each, and the systems issues which enhance or inhibit the treatment process. In addition, you need to consider the theoretical issues discussed in class and use these in your analysis of what is working or not, why might this be the case, and what theory would facilitate increased understanding and improvement in the child, family, worker, and systems relationships involved in the treatment process. Finally, what would a given theory suggest (or an integration of theories suggest) would be the next step in the treatment process.










UCLA


^ SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY AND SOCIAL RESEARCH

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE


FINAL PAPER

ADVANCED DIRECT PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS


231 C #4 with Mary Kay Oliveri


Most of the work for your final paper in this class will occur prior to the moment that you sit down to write it. This assignment is to be approached by you as an attempt to articulate and make secure the beginning base of your “Practice Wisdom” ... “as it is defined in (Klein and Bloom, 1995)... (as) offer(ing) the opportunity to draw from empirical research, theory, direct practice experiences, and personal subjective views in a comprehensive approach to recognizing and applying knowledge,” (pg. 799-800). In this case, you will be identifying and using knowledge and ‘Practice Wisdom’ as it applies to working with children, adolescents and their families.


I would like for you to:

-read the cases in the casebook developed by you and your classmates;

-think about your own caseloads in child and family agencies;

-consider the information and experiences you have had during the in-class presentations;

- consider if you will the lectures and professors comments about the field at hand;

-think about the relative value of the readings you have done in the various areas of focus for this class;

-consider your own personal place in all of this and the way in which you use yourself as a learner, writer, researcher, clinician.


And finally, think about the following concerns:

-the identification of children, adolescent and families as healthy or unhealthy from various perspectives, such as schools, mental health, health, protective services;

-reciprocity;

-action, language, interaction, and play across the life course;

-temperament;

-goodness of fit;

-risk and resilience;

-attachment, separation, loss, and trauma;

-differential assessment;

-universal components of the treatment process;

-aspects of the child, adolescents or family’s life that require modifications in treatment;

-different ways to approach treatment from both a thinking and doing perspective.


Take a deep breath and begin to think about what emerges as salient for you in all of this material. It might be helpful to imagine that you are standing on a small island of some kind...think of theory, research, methods, and the behavioral observations about kids and families that supposedly inform these ideas as an ocean on one side of you...your experience in living, practice, interaction with others, integration of ideas and experiences with yourself make up an ocean on the other side...you can see and hear and touch much of what is around you...you are less able to know what is underneath the waters around you and what is beyond your sight...but you are standing on an island, possibly one of several, an “island of relative stability,” (Klein and Bloom, 1995 pg. 800).


Your task is to describe this “island of relative stability,” the beginning base of your developing clinical practice wisdom for work with children, adolescents and their families. You are to write a position paper, which is a clear statement of your way of thinking about, approaching, gathering information, formulating working hypothesis, and beginning to intervene with children, adolescents, and families that present at clinics in need of some kind of information, support, or assistance with changing the family situation.


This paper should be clear and concise. You do not need to address everything that you are asked to think about, but to chose the most critical or important aspects of your experience in this course and in clinical practice and to write about these. This may include mentioning why something else is less important, it is up to you. The paper should include some use of citations from the readings and from the casebook. The citations from the casebook should be illustrative of your ideas or points, assume the reader knows the cases. Use a citation from more than one case.


The overall guide for this paper is to answer the question that you will be asked on your job interviews: “How do you describe your theoretical orientation, its strengths and vulnerabilities included, as a guide to working with children, adolescents and their families?” or the related question, “Tell me what you have come to understand about working with kids and families, what do you do when you are with them in a professional capacity and why do you do these things?” Thinking about being asked these questions in an interview will help you keep your paper short...it is a position statement a summary of the key components of your island and some supporting description, a map so to speak. It should be 5 or 6 pages at the most, some of you will be able to do this in less space. You can be creative or straightforward as you chose. There are no mistakes...just good critical thinking and clear writing that this instructor can read. The paper is due the day of class, during exam week.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

231C Advanced SW Practice with Children and Adolescents

Spring 2005


Professor: M. K. Oliveri, MSW, LCSW Diplomate


COURSEPACK: Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy-General Issues and Principles


Aspects of Child/Adolescent Problems in Clinical Practice

Cicchetti, D. and Toth, S. (1998). Developmental Perspectives on Trauma: the Rochester Symposium. University of Rochester Press.

Chap. 5: Gabarino, James. “Growing Up in a Socially Toxic Environment,” p. 141-54.

Chap. 3: Downey, G. and Khouri, H. and Feldman, S. “Early Interpersonal Trauma and Later Adjustment: The Mediational Role of Rejection Sensitivity,” p. 85-114.

Webb, Nancy Boyd. (2003). Social Work Practice With Children. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 1: “Children’s Problems and Needs,” p. 3-15.

Chap. 2: “Necessary Background for Helping Children,” p. 16-35.

Chap. 3: “Building Relationships with all Relevant Systems,” p. 39-56.

Cassidy, J. and Shaver, P. (1999). Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 2: Kobak, R. “The Emotional Dynamics of Disruptions in Attachment Relationships,” p. 21-43.

Chap. 23: Lyons-Ruth, K. and Jacobvitz, D. “Attachment Disorganization: Unresolved Loss, Relational Violence, and Lapses in Behavioral and Attentional Strategies,” p. 520-554.

Chap. 31: van Ijzendoorn, M. and Sagi, A. “Cross-Cultural Patterns of Attachment: Universal and Contextual Dimensions,” p. 713-734.


Childhood Development and Theories of Reciprocity

Kaplan, Louise, J. (1995) No Voice Is Ever Wholly Lost. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Chap. 1: “The Human Dialogue,” p. 13-27.

Chap. 2: “Losing and Being Lost,” p. 28-47.

Fraiberg, Selma H. (1959). The Magic Years: Understanding and Handling the Problems of Early Childhood. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.

Chap. 1: “All About Witches, Ogres, Tigers, and Mental Health,” pg. 3-31.

Chap. 2: “Shake Off Slumber, and Beware...,” pg 35-67.

Winnicott, D. W. (1971). Playing and Reality. London and New York: Tavistock/Routledge.

Chap. 3: “Playing: A Theoretical Statement,” pg. 38-52.

Chess, Stella and Thomas, Alexander. (1986). Temperament in Clinical Practice. New York: The Guilford Press.

Chap 10: “Prevention and Treatment General Considerations,” p. 148-58.

Chap. 11: “Parent Guidance,” pg 159-191.

Chap. 12: “Direct Treatment of Child and Adult,” pg 192-204.

Cicchetti, D. and Beeghly, M., (eds.). (1990). The Self in Transition Infancy to Childhood. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chap 3: Emde, R. and Buchsbaum, H. “‘Didn’t You Hear My Mommy?’ Autonomy with Connectedness in Moral Self Emergence.” p. 35-59.

Chap 7: Meltzoff, A. “Foundations for Developing a Concept of Self: The Role of Imitation in Relating Self to Other and the Value of Social Mirroring, Social Modeling and Self Practice in Infancy,” p. 139-164.

Chap 12: Watson, M. “Aspects of Self Development as Reflected in Children’s Role Playing,” P. 265-280.

Malchiodi, Cathy A. (1998). Understanding Children’s Drawings. New York: The Guilford Press.

Chap. 2, ‘Children’s Drawings in context,’ pgs, 19-40.

Chap. 3, ‘Working with Children and Their Drawings,’ pgs 41-63.


Attachment Theory, Research and Clinical Practice

Bowlby, John. (1988). A Secure Base: Parent-Child Attachment and Healthy Human Development. Basic Books, a Division of Harper-Collins Pub.

Lecture 8: “Attachment, communication and the therapeutic process,” pg. 137-157.

Howe, D. (ed). (1996). Attachment and Loss in Child and Family Social Work. Aldershot, Brookfield USA: Ashgate.

Chap. 1: Howe, D. “Attachment theory in child and family social work,” p. 1-17.

Chap. 4: Rashid, S. Parviz. “Attachment reviewed through a cultural lens,” p. 59-81.

Chap. 8: Thoburn, J. “Psychological parenting and child placement: ‘but we want to have our cake and eat it,’” p. 129-145.

Chap. 9: Pearson, K. “Care leavers and their babies,” p.146-162.

Parkes, C.M. and Stevenson-Hinde, J. and Marris, P. (1991). Attachment Across the Life Cycle. New York: Routledge.

Chap. 2: Aisnworth, Mary D. Salter. “Attachment and other affectional bonds across the life cycle,” p. 33-51.

Chap. 9: Aisnworth, Mary D.S. and Eichberg, C. “Effects on infant-mother attachment of mother’s unresolved loss of an attachment figure, or other traumatic experience,” p. 160-183.

Chap. 10: Hopkins, J. “Failure of the holding relationship: Some effects of physical rejection on the child’s attachment and inner experience,” p. 187-198.

Chap. 11: Byng-Hall, J. “The application of attachment theory to understanding and treatment in family therapy,” p. 198-215.

Schaefer, Charles E. (Ed). The Therapeutic Powers of Play. New Jersey: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Chap. 11: Jernberg, Ann M. “Attachment Formation,” pg. 241-265.

Iwaniec, D. (1996). Chap. 5: “Attachment and bonding in Cases of Emotional Abuse,” p. 59-67 and Chap. 4: “Emotional Abuse and Neglect: Effects on the Growing child,” pgs. 48-58 in The Emotionally Abused and Neglected Child: Identification, Assessment, and Intervention. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Fish, Betty. (1996). “Clinical Implications of Attachment Narratives.” ^ Clinical Social Work Journal: Vol. 24, #3, Fall, pg. 239-253.


Therapeutic Use of Self

Brandell, Jerrold R. (1992). Countertransference in Psychotherapy with Children and Adolescents. New York: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Chap. 3: Ekstein, Rudolf and Wallerstein, Judith, and Mandelbaum, Arthur. “Countertransference in the Residential Treatment of Children,” pg. 59-87.

Chap 7: Giovacchini, Peter L. “The Severly Disturbed Adolescent,” pg 141-162.

O’Connor, K.J. (1991). The Play Therapy Primer: An Integration of Theories and Techniques. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Chap. 3: “Impact of the Therapist’s Personal Philosophy, Values, and Cultural Background on the Practice of Play Therapy,’ p. 42-56.

Chap. 11: “Transference and Countertransference,” p. 273-281.

Killen, Kari. (1996). “How Far Have We Come in Dealing with the Emotional Challenge of Abuse and Neglect?” ^ Child Abuse and Neglect: Vol. 20, #9, pg. 791-95


Critical Issues in the Treatment Process with Children, Adolescents, and their Families

Cooper, Shirley and Wanerman, Leon. (1977). Children in Treatment: A Primer for Beginning Psychotherapists. New York: Bruner/Mazel. Inc., Pub.

Chap. 3: “Special Aspects of Treatment with Children,” pg. 65-71.

Barker, Philip. (1990). Clinical Interviews with Children and Adolescents. New York: W.W. Norton and Co.

Chap. 11: Barker, Philip. “Special Clinical Situations,” pg.128-140.

Wachtel, Ellen F. (1994). Treating Troubled Children and Their Families. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 6, “Essential Psychodynamic Concepts,” pgs 114-157.

Chap. 7, “Interventions Based on Psychodynamic Formulations,” pgs 158-197.

Chap. 8, “Behavioral Interventions,” pgs. 198-232

Schaefer, Charles E. (Eds.). (1993). The Therapeutic Power of Play. New Jersey: Jason

Chap. 1: Schaefer, C. “What Is Play and Why Is It Therapeutic?,” pg 1-15.

Chap. 2: Bow, James. “Overcoming Resistance,” pg. 17-41.

Chap. 3: Landreth, Gary. “Self-Expressive Communication,” pg. 41-63.

Chap. 6: Ginsberg, B. “Catharsis,” p.107-141.

O’Connor, K.J. (1991). The Play Therapy Primer: An Integration of Theories and Techniques. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Chap. 1: “Definition and History of Play Therapy,” p. 3-13.

Chap. 2: “Theories of Play Therapy,” p. 14-41.

Chap. 8: “Beginning Treatment,” p. 200-218.

Chap. 9: “Making Play Therapy Sessions Therapeutic,” p. 219-253.

Schaefer, C. E. and Cangelosi, D.M. (eds.). (1993). Play Therapy Techniques. New Jersey: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Chap. 2: Conn, J. H. “The Play-Interview,” p. 9-44.

Chap. 3: Hambridge, G. “Structured Play Therapy,” p.45-61.

Landreth, Garry L. (2002) Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship, 2nd ed. New

York: Brunner-Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

Chap. 2: “The Meaning of Play,” p. 9-26.

Chap. 10: “Characteristics of Facilitative Responses,” p. 207-244.

Chap. 11: “Therapeutic Limit Setting,” p. 245-272.

Donovan, D.M. and McIntyre, D. (1990). Healing the Hurt Child: A Developmental Contextual Approach. New York: W.W. Norton and Co.

Chap. 1: “Complex Obstacles to a Simple Understanding of Children,” p. 1-21.

Chap. 2: “How Children Think, Communicate, Interact, and Change,” P. 22-32.

Chap. 3: “A Developmental-Contextual Approach to Child Psychotherapy,” p. 33-54.

Chap. 4: “Normative, Pathological and Therapeutic Dissociation in Childhood,” p. 55- 75.

Mishne, Judith Marks. (1986). Clinical Work with Adolescents. New York: The Free Press, a Division of Macmillan, Inc.

Chap. 21: “Criteria for Family, Group, and Individual Therapy,” pg. 289-297.

Chap. 24: “The Treatment Relationship,” pg. 325-343.

Chap. 25: “Resistance and Working Through: Foci in the Middle Phase of Treatment,” pg. 344-357.

Webb, Nancy Boyd, (ed). (1991). Play therapy with Children In Crisis: A Casebook for Practitioners. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 1: Webb, N. “Assessment of the Child in Crisis,” p. 3-25

Chap. 2: Webb, N. “Play Therapy Crisis Intervention with Children,” p. 26-42.

Chap. 3: Webb, N. “Observation of Parental Violence, Case of Michael, Age 4,” p.45-68

McMahon, Linnet. (1992). The handbook of play therapy. New York: Routledge.

Chap 4, “Play in under fives and family work.” pgs 71-95

Chap 5, “ Play therapy for children living in unhappy families,” pgs 96-116.

Chap 6, “Play for children with illness disabilities and learning difficulties,” pgs 117-137.

Chap 7, “Play for children in bereavement and divorce,” pgs 138-53.

Chap 8, “The use of play in helping sexually abused children,” pgs 154-79.

Pynoos, R.S. and Eth, S. (1986). “Witness to Violence: The Child Interview.” Journal of American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 25, 3, p. 306-19.

Brandell, Jerrold R. (ed.). (1997). Theory and Practice in Clinical Social Work. New York: The Free Press.

Chap. 12: Kerlin, Louise R. and Brandell, Jerrold R. “Family Violence and Clinical Practice,” pg 345-379.

Boik, Barbara Labovitz and Goodwin, E. Anna. (2000). Sandplay Therapy: A Step-by-Step Manual for Psychotherapists of Diverse Orientations. New York: W.W. Morton and Co.

Chap 1, “ Overview of Sandplay,” pgs. 1-18.

Chap 5, “Spontaneous San Trays with Children and Families,” pgs 122-158.

Ho, Man Keung. (1992). Minority children and Adolescents in Therapy. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.

Chap. 1: “Transcultural Framework for Assessment and Therapy with Ethnic Minority Children and Youth,” pg. 7-29

Chap. 8: “Cultural-Specific Methods, Techniques, and Skills in Group Therapy,” pg. 178-202.

Gibbs, Jewelle Taylor and Huang, Larke Nahme and Associates. (1989). Children of Color: Psychological Interventions with Minority Youth. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Chap. 10: Gibbs, Jewelle T. “Biracial Adolescents,” pg. 322-350.

Chap. 11: Huang & Gibbs “Multicultural Perspectives: Two Clinical Cases,” pg. 351-74.


WEB READINGS: Child and Adolescent Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Issues and Principles


Contributions from Psychodynamic Theory toward Developmental Understandings and Clinical Relationships with Children and Adolescence

Solnit, A. J. and Cohen, D. J. and Neubauer, P.B. (eds.). (1993). The Many Meanings of Play: A Psychoanalytic Perspective. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Chap 1: Marans, S. and Mayes, L. and Colonna, A. “Psychoanalytic Views of Children’s Play,” p. 9-28.

Chap 2: Solnit, A.J. “From Play to Palyfulness in Children and Adults,” p. 29-43.

Chap 3: Neubauer, P.B. “Playing: Technical Implications,” p. 44-56.

Chap 11: Marans, S. (MSW). “From Enactment to Play to Discussion: The Analysis of a Young Girl,” p. 183-200.

Freud, Anna. (1965) The Writings of Anna Freud, Vol VI: Normality and Pathology In Childhood: Assessments of Development, 1965. New York: International Universities Press, Inc.:

Chap 1: “The Psychoanalytic View of Childhood: Long-Distance and Close-Up,” p.3-24.

Chap 2: “The Relations Between Child Analysis and Adult Analysis,” p. 25-53.

Chap 3: “The Assessment of Normality in Childhood,” p. 54-107.

Wachtel, Ellen F. (1994). Treating Troubled Children and Their Families. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 5: “Anxiety, Adaptational Styles, and Defense Mechanisms,” pg. 108-133.

Jackson, H, (ed).. (1991). Using Self Psychology in Psychotherapy. New Jersey: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Chap 4: Young, T. M. “Children,” p. 73-90.

Chap 5: Elson, M. “Adolescents,” p. 91-116.

Geller, Jesse D. (1987). “The Process of Psychotherapy: Separation and the Complex Interplay Among empathy, Insight, and Internalization (Chap. 15).” In, Jonathan and Sally Bloom-Feshbach and Associates. The Psychology of Separation and Loss. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Pub., pg 459-514.

Esman, A. H. (1975). The Psychology of Adolescence: Essential Readings. New York: International Universities Press, Inc.

-Johnson, Adelaide. M. “Sanctions for Superego Lacunae of Adolescents,” p. 245-263.

-Blos, Peter. “The Concept of Acting Out in Relation to the Adolescent Process,” p. 267- 283.
^

Liberman, A. F.. (1997). Chap. 9, “Toddler’s Internalization of Maternal Attribution as


a Factor in Quality Attachment.” In, Atkinson and Zucker, Attachment Psychopathology. New York: Guilford Press.

Cassidy, J. and Shaver, P. (1999). Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and

Clinical Applications. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 17: Feeney, “Adult Romantic Attachment and Couples Relationships.”

Chap. 19: Heese, “Adult Attachment Interview.”

Chap. 24: Liberman and Zeanah, “Contributions of Attachment Theory to Infant-

Parent Psychotherapy.”

Chap. 27: Byng-Hall, “Family and Couples Psychotherapy.”

Chap. 28: George and Solomon, “Attachment and Caregiving.”

Chap. 29: Howe, “Attachment Relationships in Context of Multiple Cargivers.”

McMahon, Linnet. (1992). ^ The handbook of play therapy. New York: Routledge.

Chap. 7: “Play of Children in Bereavement and Divorce.”

Chap. 8: “Use of Play in Helping Sexually Abused Children.”


Contributions from Self-Psychology and Object Relations Theory toward Understanding and Using Clinical Relationships with Children and Adolescence

Davis, M. and Wallbridge, D. (1981;1987). Boundary and Space: An Introduction to the Work of D.W. Winnicott. New York: Bruner/Mazel Pub.

Chap 2: “The Theory of Emotional Development,” p. 25-136.

Schaefer, C.E. and Cangelosi, D.M., (eds). (1993). Play therapy Techniques. New Jersey: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Chap 15: Claman, L. “The Squiggle-Drawing Game,” p.177-189.

Seinfield, Jeffery. (1993). Chap. 6: “Donald Winnicott and the Holding Relationship,” pgs. 103-119. Interpreting and Holding: The Paternal and Maternal Functions of the Psychotherapist. New Jersey: Jason Aronson.

Hamilton, Gregory. (1990). Self and Others: Object Relations Theory in Practice. New Jersey. Jason Aronson.

Chap. 6, “Psychological Mechanisms,” pg 59-126.

Chap. 13, “Relationship within Technique,” pgs 183-204.

Wolfe, Ernest S. (1988). Treating the Self: Elements of Clinical Self Psychology. New York: Guilford Press.

Chap. 4, “Selfs and SelfObjects,” pgs 50-64.

Chap. 5, “SelfObject Relations Disorders: Disorders of the Self,” pgs. 65-76.

Chap.7, “The Setting,” pgs 87-93.

Chap.8, “Principles,” pgs 94-101.

Chap. 9, “The Therapeutic Process,” pgs 102-123.

Berger, David M.. (1987). Clinical Empathy. New Jersey: Jason Aronson.

Chap. 2, “The Traditional Concept of Empathy,” pgs 19-40.

Chap. 3, “Empathy in Self Psychology,” pgs, 41-60.

Chap. 6m “Entering the Patient’s World,” pgs. 97-114.

Masterson, James F. (1985). The Real Self: A Developmental, Self, and Object Relations Approach. New York: Bruner/Mazel publishers.

Chap. 3, “The Real Self: Structure and Development,” pgs 20-29..

Chap. 4, “The Impaired Real-Self: Psychopathology,” pgs 30-51.

Chap. 5, “Treatment of the Impaired Real Self: Communicative Matching,” pgs 52-92.

Sherwood, Vance R. (1998). Getting Past Resistance in Psychotherapy with the Out-of-Control Adolescent. New Jersey: Jason Aronson, inc.

Chap. 1, “Forms of Resistance in Out-Of-Control Adolescents,” pgs. 7-27.

Chap. 2-The Role of Manipulation in the Treatment of Out of Control Patients.” pgs. 29-45.

Ormont, Louis R. (1992). The Group therapy Experience: From Theory to Practice.

New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Chap 9: “Geography of Resistance.”

Chap 10: “The Resistance-Their Curious Desirablity.”

Chap 11: “Unveiling Resistance.”

Chap. 12: “Resolving Resistance.”


Therapeutic Use of Self

Coady, Nick F. And Wolgien, Cyril S. (1996). “Good therapists’ Views of How They Are Helpful.” ^ Clinical Social Work Journal: Vol 24, #3, Fall, pg. 311-322.

Raines, James C. (1996). “Self Disclosure in Clinical Social Work.” Clinical Social Work Journal: Vol 24, #4, Winter, pg. 357-375.

Goldstein, Eda G. (1994). “Self-Disclosure in Treatment: what Therapists Do and Don’t Talk About.” Clinical Social Work Journal: Vol 22, #4, Winter, pg. 417-433.

Ormont, Louis R. (1992). The Group therapy Experience: From Theory to Practice. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Chap. 5: “What the Therapist Feels,” pg 51-82.

^

Issues in Evidenced Based Treatment



Mass, J. (Spring 2003). Evidence-Based Assessment of Children With Behavioral and

Emotional Disorders. In Emotional & Behavioral Disorders in Youth, 30, 52-55. Civic Research Institute, Inc.

Jensen, P. (Spring 2003). What Is the Evidence for Evidence-Based Treatments? In

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders in Youth, 37-41, 48. Civic Research Institute, Inc.

Barrett, P.M. and Ollendick, T. H. (eds) (2004). Handbook of Interventions that Work

with Chidlren and Adolescents: Prevention and Treatment. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons.
Chap. 1: Ollendick and King “Empirically supported Treatments for Children and

Adolescents, Advances Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

Chap. 2: Holmbeck, Greenley and Franks , “Developmental Issues in

Evidence-Based Practice.”

Chap. 4: Singh and Oswald, “Evaluation Issues in Evidence-Based Practice.”

Chap. 5: Sonderegger and Barrett, “Assessment and Treatment of ethnically

Diverse Children and Adolescents.”







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