For Southwest Georgia Technical College icon

For Southwest Georgia Technical College



Approved by DTAE

6-11-07

Perkins IV Transition Plan

For

Southwest Georgia Technical College

Submitted to the

Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education


(1) Describe how the career and technical education programs required under section 135(b) will be carried out with funds received under this title.


Introduction

Southwest Georgia Technical College (SWGTC) offers certificate, diploma, associate of applied science degrees, and the associate degree in nursing and expends Perkins funds to improve student performance in his/her selected technical program(s) of study overall and in special population groups. The SWGTC Retention/Special Population Specialist provides services to students who are Single Parents, Displaced Homemakers, Economically Disadvantaged, and/or students enrolled in non-traditional training. The Retention Coordinator provides services to students who are Educationally Disadvantaged. The College Counselor provides support for Students with Disabilities. This support includes a wide variety of services depending on the specific needs of students each academic term (i.e. signers, audio translation of academic study material, alternative testing opportunities, and assistive technology). The College Counselor also provides support for Limited English Proficient students. Academically Disadvantaged students and students with Limited English Proficiency, as well as other students in need, are served by full-time and part-time tutors in the College Tutoring Center. All students, including special population students, are served through the College advisement system and by the Career Services staff. Additionally, Perkins funds are used to purchase equipment and provide professional development.


^ Mandate One

To strengthen the academic and career and technical skills of students participating in career and technical education programs, by strengthening the academic and career and technical education components of such programs through the integration of academics with career and technical education programs through a coherent sequence of courses, such as career and technical programs of study described in section 122(c)(1)(A), to ensure learning in the core academic subjects and career and technical education subjects


SWGTC is one of thirty-four technical colleges in the Department of Technical and Adult Education (DTAE), also known as the Technical College System of Georgia. SWGTC offers and delivers technical programs of study leading to a Technical Certificate of Credit (TCC), a Diploma, an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree, and the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) utilizing the State standards and guidelines as required by DTAE. The programs of study are logically sequenced, comprehensive to industry and relevant knowledge, and are thorough in size, scope, and quality to be effective. Diploma and degree programs (and some TCCs) include academic courses such as English, Math, Psychology, and Science. The Deans of Academic Affairs, supported by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, ensure that academic competencies are included in technical courses. SWGTC utilizes state-of-the-art technology in the delivery of the curriculum.


SWGTC maintains agreements with the high schools within its service area (Cairo, Mitchell County, Pelham, Thomas County Central, and Thomasville) to articulate curriculum from the secondary setting to the postsecondary institutions. This allows students to follow the appropriate programs of study and to seamlessly move from career and technical paths of study in high school to programs of study at SWGTC. Exemption evaluations for courses have been developed, which allow high school students who have the required knowledge to receive college credit without enrolling and completing the college course.

^ Mandate Two

To link career and technical education at the secondary level and career and technical education at the postsecondary level, including by offering the relevant elements of not less than 1 career and technical program of study described in section 122(c)(1)(A)

The Georgia Department of Education (DOE) has developed programs of study in eight program concentration areas: Agriculture; Architecture, Communication, and Transportation; Business and Computer Science; Engineering and Technology; Family and Consumer Sciences; Government and Public Safety; Healthcare Science; and Marketing, Sales, and Service. Programs of study such as Drafting, Network Systems, Computing, Early Childhood Care and Education, Criminal Justice Technology, Nursing, Cosmetology, Medical Assisting, Marketing Management and others can be offered in a seamless system though the DOE’s programs of study. The Education and Career Partnership (ECP) Manager for the partnership will work to develop career pathways in Healthcare Science and Agriculture Science by the end of FY 08 and will develop a long range plan to develop other pathways from the program concentration areas listed above beginning in FY 09.


^ Mandate Three

To provide students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of an industry, which may include work-based learning experiences

The strength of the majority of the programs of study at SWGTC is the hands-on experiences gained from internships, practicum, and/or clinical rotations. These experiences are provided throughout the program of study to give the students a real world of work vantage point and to prepare them for entry into their chosen career. The Deans of Academic Affairs, supported by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, ensure that programs offered provide students strong experience in and understanding of the associated business and/or industry. The laboratories and simulation classrooms prepare the students for the actual work world by providing the opportunity to work and live through possible scenarios they could encounter in the work world. For example, the Associate Degree Nursing simulation lab offers birthing, intravenous, pediatric and human patient simulators. The Automotive Technology lab simulates an automotive shop, and the Cosmetology lab simulates a business. Students are exposed to many aspects of these chosen industries through these simulations.


The Perkins funds provide faculty opportunities for professional development to increase knowledge and skills. Local funds provide opportunities for faculty to visit/tour businesses/ industries related to their teaching assignments. The Career and Job Placement staff member assists students in obtaining employment in the industries for which they are training.


^ Mandate Four

To develop, improve, or expand the use of technology in career and technical education, which may include--

A-training of career and technical education teachers, faculty, and administrators to use technology, which may include distance learning;

SWGTC is committed to enhancing student achievement through a technologically rich teaching and learning environment. Perkins funding supports the purchase of equipment and training for faculty and the online coordinator for the effective integration of technology into both traditional and web-based classrooms. Annual professional development, supported by local funding, also provides faculty, staff, and administrators with opportunities to participate in activities that expand technical skills in the latest in-field technologies, technologies that are used to deliver and enhance instruction and student services. Training opportunities are offered on campus and online. Additionally, faculty research and attend off-campus activities that provide training that improves occupational skills.


Through the DTAE Professional Development Center, TechForce Georgia offers industry certification training in Information Technology, as well as multiple training courses aimed at both faculty and professional development for DTAE employees. All training is led by industry-certified instructors in state-of-the-art labs. Certification courses emphasize hands-on learning and exam preparation. Technology training is provided in areas associated with Microsoft, Cisco Systems, Sun Microsystems, A+, Net+, Certified Internet Webmaster, and Blackboard Learning Management System.


B-providing career and technical education students with the academic and career and technical skills (including the mathematics and science knowledge that provides a strong basis for such skills) that lead to entry into the technology fields;

It is through participation in professional development activities, industry shows, technical publications, and return to industry, which keeps faculty current with the latest developments in industry and ensures that academic competencies are included in technical courses. When available, funds from Perkins and the State of Georgia allow for the purchase of state-of-the-art equipment for the classrooms.


C-encouraging schools to collaborate with technology industries to offer voluntary internships and mentoring programs, including programs that improve the mathematics and science knowledge of students.

Internship, practicum, and clinical courses are integral components and a requirement of many allied health, business and computer, professional services, and technical and industrial programs.

It is through internships, such as those provided by John Deere dealerships and Archbold Medical Center, that students are allowed to work in the high tech professions. These opportunities extend the classroom into the working environment and provide practical training and experience on cutting edge equipment and technologies.


^ Mandate Five

To provide professional development programs that are consistent with section 122 to secondary and postsecondary teachers, faculty, administrators, and career guidance and academic counselors who are involved in integrated career and technical education programs

SWGTC’s professional development program is designed to meet institutional training needs. Faculty and staff responses to the annual ^ Staff Development Needs Survey are used by the President’s Leadership Council and staff development coordinator to determine the activities to be offered on campus for the coming year. Individual annual staff development plans also include off-campus training opportunities to improve and enhance instructional and occupational skills.


Perkins funds enable professional development and additional training to improve occupational skills and to further develop teaching skills and student support services. Professional development training includes topics such as improving student achievement and retention, enhancing instructional strategies, implementing assessment techniques, and learning to effectively utilize educational technologies.


Program advisory committees that meet twice per year help faculty determine training needed to maintain currency within all aspects of their fields. Evidence-based research and the study of best practices and current trends also help faculty and staff to locate training resources for program specific technologies and teaching methods. The knowledge and skills acquired through these opportunities help to better facilitate a rigorous but supportive teaching and learning environment.


^ Mandate Six

To develop and implement evaluations of the career and technical education programs carried out with funds under this title, including an assessment of how the needs of special populations are being met

SWGTC has a formal annual assessment process in place whereby all units and programs evaluate performance relative to established expected outcomes, and programs also evaluate performance relative to established program student learning outcomes. Included in this process, College units and programs evaluate compliance with the DTAE standards, and programs evaluate performance relative to established performance measures as a part of the DTAE Performance Accountability System (PAS). PAS promotes quality and excellence in technical programs and service units and measures the degree to which the technical colleges within the DTAE system are successful in carrying out their missions. Programs of study must meet enrollment, award, and placement benchmarks to remain open. Programs not meeting benchmarks must improve or be terminated. Also, every three years, SWGTC participates in a Performance Accountability Review (PAR) in which an external team evaluates the College, Perkins Improvement Plan activities, and Perkins Budget expenditures.


Additionally, SWGTC also has Annual Planning and Budgeting and Staff Development Planning systems in place. Each year every functional unit, including those who serve special populations, writes goals, objectives, and activities to be accomplished. At the end of the planning year, these goals, objectives, and activities are evaluated and programs and service units report on resulting improvements. Each member of the faculty and staff establishes a staff development plan.


SWGTC receives an annual data report from DTAE, which summarizes the College’s performance relative to both overall student performance and that of specific special population groups. The College uses this report, in addition to data reports produced quarterly and annually by the Registrar, to monitor progress on an on-going basis. Improvement plans are developed that specify how the College will modify services to students overall and to special population groups in order to improve student performance. The Perkins Plan is monitored on a continuous basis by the Perkins Committee.


^ Mandate Seven

To initiate, improve, expand, and modernize quality career and technical education programs, including relevant technology

Funds provided by Perkins, the State, and the SWGTC Foundation allow SWGTC to improve, expand, and modernize instructional programs. Each program maintains a prioritized list of equipment needed to provide state-of-the-art industry standard instruction. Technology updates are imperative for industry specific instruction.


^ Mandate Eight

To provide services and activities that are of sufficient size, scope, and quality to be effective

SWGTC is committed to providing career and technical education programs that are of such size, scope, and quality to enable students to graduate and to be successfully employed in his/her field of study. SWGTC currently offers 84 programs of study (18 associate degrees, 20 diploma, 46 certificates) and 595 courses. Additional programs of study and courses are added each year to meet the needs of the local economy and business and industry within the service area. Enrollment averages 8.46 students per course, a size conducive to effective instruction. A list of programs of study and courses is in the College Catalog beginning on page 71 and may be viewed online at

http://www.southwestgatech.edu/coned/downloads/2007_catalog.pdf.


Each year the College’s programs of study are evaluated according to program expected outcomes, which include Performance Accountability System (PAS) measures. Programs of study must meet enrollment, award, and placement benchmarks to remain open. Annually, SWGTC reviews all programs of study. The results of these reviews are used to terminate, improve, or expand the various programs of study. Students evaluate instructors and instruction of courses on an ongoing basis. All instructors and instruction are evaluated Fall and Spring Quarters. Selected and new instructors or instructors teaching new courses are evaluated Summer and Winter quarters.


^ Mandate Nine

Provide activities to prepare special populations, including single parents and displaced homemakers who are enrolled in career and technical education programs, for high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations that will lead to self-sufficiency.

SWGTC is open to all students, including single parents and displaced homemakers and other special population groups. The programs of study available at SWGTC reflect the needs of employers in the three-county service area as well as the mission of the College. Labor market data is analyzed to insure that programs offered will meet the demands of area employers and prepare students, including all special population students, for high skill, high wage, and high demand occupations.


The SWGTC self-disclosing Special Populations Survey is completed by new students as they begin their first quarter of study. Workshops are presented to students on timely topics, which support, inform, and prepare them to be successful in the classroom and in the workplace. The Student Services staff provides career counseling, and instructors complete program advising with students. Retention services are provided for the general student population as well as single parents, displaced homemakers, and all other special populations, as well as non-traditional students.


Using Perkins funding, SWGTC employs a Retention Coordinator, Retention/Special Population Specialist, and College Counselor who join other personnel to advise, counsel, and support special population students enrolled in programs leading to high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand jobs. Services provided include counseling, orientation activities, assessments, workshops, group events and individual student contacts. These staff members are trained through professional development, using Perkins funds, to advise, support, and encourage students as they enroll in and complete programs leading to self-sufficiency.


(2) Describe how the career and technical education activities will be carried out with respect to meeting State and local adjusted levels of performance established under section 113.


Core Indicator One - Student attainment of challenging career and technical skill proficiencies, including student achievement on technical assessments, that are aligned with industry-recognized standards, if available and appropriate.

SWGTC’s curriculum provides students with challenging skill proficiencies as taught by knowledgeable and experienced instructors. Instructors are kept current in skills through attending and participating in professional development activities. Instructional media is accessible through the Library Media Services Center as an additional resource to aid in skill development. Student skills are further enhanced through the use of technologically advanced equipment. These skills are assessed for some programs by using industry-recognized examinations (i.e. CISCO, NCLEX-RN, Cosmetology State Board, etc.). In some instances, programs have rigorous assessments within the coursework structure and during the internship phase when students are evaluated by employers. Each program has established Student Learning Outcomes and evaluates student performance on specific assessments for each Student Learning Outcome. Prior quarter student academic data is examined during Perkins Committee meetings to determine academic and technical courses where students are having the most difficulty, and suggestions are identified to improve student performance.


Core Indicator Two - Student attainment of an industry-recognized credential, a certificate, or a degree.

SWGTC is a unit of the Department of Technical and Adult Education of Georgia and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools: Commission on Colleges. The College has the authority to grant Technical Certificates of Credit, Diplomas, and Associate Degrees. SWGTC uses the State’s standard curriculum, which has been developed with industry input. Industry representatives serve on the local advisory committees and provide invaluable insight and advice as to community needs for programs of study and quality of graduates. Prior quarter student data is examined during Perkins Committee meetings to determine programs where students are having the most difficulty completing, and suggestions are identified to improve student graduation rate performance.


Core Indicator Three - Student retention in postsecondary education or transfer to a baccalaureate degree program.

SWGTC formed the Retention Committee to develop a comprehensive Retention Plan for the College. The Committee is responsible for the study and promotion of student success strategies in order to enable students to progress toward goal attainment. Additionally, the Committee regularly reviews retention data and survey results to identify barriers to student success and develop methods to minimize those barriers.


The College provides consistent student advisement, a College Success course, various student activities and organizations, student book loans, assessment services, career and personal counseling, comprehensive tutoring services, and other strategies to improve student retention and goal attainment. Student success workshops are also held on a quarterly basis in order to improve student success and facilitate the completion of student program goals. These workshops cover such topics as test taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, financial literacy, time management, and stress management.


The student book loan program provides students of limited financial means the opportunity to borrow textbooks for the quarter, helping to increase retention and graduation/completion rates. Assessment services include the administration of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) as an early intervention tool used to identify deficiencies in current learning habits, study practices, and attitudes of at-risk students. Results from the LASSI are used to develop individual Student Success Plans, which include completion of LASSI instructional modules to remediate identified deficiencies and improve student success in courses, retention, and graduation.


A Retention/Special Population Specialist works to expand retention services to special population students and to students enrolled in non-traditional programs for their gender. This is accomplished by providing guidance and direct support services through regular personal contact and individual and group activities.

An articulation agreement was recently implemented with the local university to better facilitate the transfer of SWGTC students to four-year degree programs in Criminal Justice, Management and Supervisory Development, Medical Lab Technology, Administrative Office Technology, and Accounting.


Core Indicator Four - Student placement in military service or apprenticeship programs or placement or retention in employment, including placement in high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations or professions.

The overall placement rate for SWGTC for FY 2006 was 99.05% and the in-field placement rate was 91.60%. Local funds are used to finance a dedicated position to provide placement services to students. Services provided include one-on-one assistance with resume writing, job search strategies, and job retention skills; access to resources such as the Internet and newspaper job listings; and matching students with employer requirements, then referring them to specific job openings. Group sessions are also provided to students through workshops and classroom presentations, and the topics of job retention and advancement are included. Perkins funds will be used to supplement State and local funds expended for the purchase of materials such as instructional videos used to facilitate student placement or retention in employment, including placement in high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations or professions. Placement data is examined during Perkins Committee meetings to identify programs with the lowest placement rate, and suggestions are made to improve student placement.


Employment retention rates of SWGTC graduates are computed by identifying and comparing those graduates who were employed one quarter after graduation with those who were employed one quarter after graduation and still employed three quarters after graduation. Programs having the lowest retention rates are identified. This information is then shared with the Perkins Committee so that recommendations for program changes to enhance employment retention can be made, if applicable.


Additionally, the College Work Ethics Program has been implemented at SWGTC. This means that students receive both an academic and a work ethic grade for each class. The ten work ethic traits, which are considered in awarding work ethic grades, include: attendance, character, teamwork, appearance, attitude, productivity, organizational skills, communication, cooperation, and respect. Evaluating students by the same attributes valued by employers helps students to be better and more successful employees upon graduation.


Core Indicator Five - Student participation in, and completion of, career and technical education programs that lead to employment in non-traditional fields.

SWGTC is open to all students and encourages equity of enrollment in all program areas including non-traditional fields. Students of underrepresented gender pursuing non-traditional programs are included in College advertising and publications used to promote enrollment in SWGTC programs.


To increase awareness and to promote enrollment of students of underrepresented gender in non-traditional programs, the College uses multiple methods for recruiting students. These methods include: on-line resources, speakers, program shadowing, career counseling, campus program tours, workshops, and CD’s and videos depicting non-traditional careers.


The Retention/Special Population Specialist provides support services to students of underrepresented gender pursuing non-traditional programs to help them complete their program of study. A Retention Plan, currently under development, will serve to guide the College in its continued efforts to graduate all students, including those students preparing for employment in non-traditional occupations.


Prior quarter data is examined during Perkins Committee meetings to determine courses/programs where students of underrepresented gender pursuing non-traditional programs are having the most difficulty in successfully completing courses, and strategies are developed to improve student performance.


(3) Describe how the eligible recipient will—

(A) offer the appropriate courses of not less than 1 of the career and technical programs of study described in section 122(c)(1)(A);

Programs of Study have been developed in eight program concentration areas based on the Governor’s Strategic Industries: Agriculture; Architecture, Communication, and Transportation; Business and Computer Science; Engineering and Technology; Family and Consumer Sciences; Government and Public Safety; Healthcare Science; and Marketing, Sales, and Service.


The Career Technical Agricultural Education (CTAE) Director of each secondary school selected a career pathway within one of the programs of study above to implement in FY 2009. Grady, Mitchell, Thomas, and Thomasville City school systems chose Healthcare Science – Therapeutic Nursing to implement, and Pelham City school system chose Agriscience. During the FY 2008 school year, the ECP Manager will assist the CTAE Directors and high school counselors to incorporate academics and relevant career and technical courses and postsecondary curriculum into Peach State Pathways: Education and Career Plans. These plans will serve as seamless education guides to provide information about postsecondary programs of study in Therapeutic Services and Agriscience at the technical college and college/university levels, as well as articulated credit, work-based learning opportunities, and a career pathway sequence of courses.


SWGTC provides dual enrollment courses/programs on the campuses of all area public high schools. Joint enrollment is also offered as an option to students not able to take dual classes during the school day. Post Secondary Credit Option students are counseled individually by the ECP Manager or the College Admissions Coordinator about secondary and postsecondary courses aligning with their college program of study.


(B) improve the academic and technical skills of students participating in career and technical education programs by strengthening the academic and career and technical education components of such programs through the integration of coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant career and technical education programs to ensure learning in—

(i) the core academic subjects (as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965); and

(ii) career and technical education subjects;

SWGTC’s curriculum provides students with challenging skill proficiencies as taught by knowledgeable and experienced instructors. Instructors are kept current in skills through attending and participating in professional development activities. Instructional media is accessible through the Library Media Services Center as an additional resource to aid in skill development. Student skills are further enhanced through the use of technologically advanced equipment. These skills are assessed for some programs by using industry-recognized examinations (i.e. CISCO, NCLEX-RN, Cosmetology State Board, etc.). In some instances, programs have rigorous assessments within the coursework structure and during the internship phase when students are evaluated by employers.


SWGTC is a unit of the Department of Technical and Adult Education of Georgia and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools: Commission on Colleges. The College has the authority to grant Technical Certificates of Credit, Diplomas, and Associate Degrees. SWGTC uses the State’s standard curriculum, which has been developed with industry input. Industry representatives serve on the local advisory committees and provide invaluable insight and advice as to community needs for programs of study and quality of graduates. Diploma and degree programs include academic courses such as English, Math, Psychology, and Science. The Deans of Academic Affairs, supported by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, ensure that academic competencies are included in technical courses.

(C) provide students with strong experience in, and understanding of, all aspects of an industry;

For a clear understanding of all aspects of industry, many of SWGTC’s programs of study provide an internship or clinical experience throughout the course of study of the chosen career. Students complete the practical experience at an employer site where they are exposed to all aspects of the industry. Prior to this practical internship, students will have had the opportunity to complete real world-of-work scenarios in the simulation classrooms and laboratories at SWGTC. For example, the Surgical Technology lab simulates an operating room, and the Automotive Technology lab simulates an automotive shop. Students are exposed to many of the aspects of their chosen professional career through these simulations. The Deans of Academic Affairs, supported by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, ensure that programs offered provide students strong experience in and understanding of the associated business and/or industry.


(D) ensure that students who participate in such career and technical education programs are taught to the same coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards as are taught to all other students; and

Students enrolled in career and technical education programs at SWGTC are provided instructional content meeting the same coherent and rigorous standards as all students. This level of instruction and academic rigor is evidenced by the College meeting regional accreditation requirements and by the articulation agreements in place with regionally accredited colleges and universities.


(E) encourage career and technical education students at the secondary level to enroll in rigorous and challenging courses in core academic subjects (as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965).

This section does not pertain to postsecondary educational institutions since they do not offer secondary courses.


(4) Describe how comprehensive professional development (including initial teacher preparation) for career and technical education, academic, guidance, and administrative personnel will be provided that promotes the integration of coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant career and technical education (including curriculum development);

Comprehensive professional development is provided for personnel locally and through DTAE. The College’s staff development planning process enables faculty, staff, and administrators to develop annual plans and staff development plans that include training to improve instructional and occupational skills. Training includes topics such as student achievement and retention, writing across the curriculum, instructional strategies, assessment techniques, intervention strategies for students with disabilities, educational technologies, and industry visits and tours.


The DTAE Professional Development Center also provides faculty development services to facilitate training and professional development activities for technical college faculty. Activities include training for full-time and part-time instructors and technology training. The courses are designed to provide instructors with instructional methods, techniques, information, and materials that can be effectively integrated into the process of teaching. In addition, speakers present information concerning standards, guides, and other pertinent instructional information within DTAE.


(5) Describe how parents, students, academic and career and technical education teachers, faculty, administrators, career guidance and academic counselors, representatives of tech prep consortia (if applicable), representatives of the entities participating in activities described in section 117 of Public Law 105–220 (if applicable), representatives of business (including small business) and industry, labor organizations, representatives of special populations, and other interested individuals are involved in the development, implementation, and evaluation of career and technical education programs assisted under this title, and how such individuals and entities are effectively informed about, and assisted in understanding, the requirements of this title, including career and technical programs of study;

All listed stakeholders are involved in some aspect of the development, implementation, and evaluation of career and technical education programs assisted under this title. The technical programs of study at SWGTC are developed by DTAE with input by representatives of business and industry. Each of SWGTC’s instructional programs within the following divisions, Allied Health Education, Business and Computer Technology, Professional Services, and Technical and Industrial Education, has a Local Advisory Committee that is involved in the establishment, evaluation, and improvement of the program of study. Members of advisory committees include a minimum of three members from business and industry that are external to the College, a currently enrolled student, a graduate (when possible), and the instructor(s) serve in an ex-officio capacity. Through formal assessment, students evaluate instructors/instruction in these programs of study on a regular basis. Also, students provide feedback on programs by completing the Student Satisfaction Survey, the High School Site Satisfaction Survey, the Graduate Exit Survey, and the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Employers of graduates also provide feedback on graduates through the Graduate Follow-up Survey. This feedback is considered in improving and/or restructuring programs.


SWGTC has a Perkins Committee made up of personnel who are responsible for services to all students, including services to special population students, and for the implementation of the Act. The Committee meets regularly, not only to develop plans such as the Perkins Local Application and the Perkins Transition Plan, but also to monitor progress in meeting the measure requirements.


During New Student Orientation, students are surveyed to determine if they belong to one or more special population group/groups. Students are provided with instructions on how to access the services available to them through Student Services including: Advisement, Counseling Services, Retention Services, Services for Special Population Students, Career and Job Search Services, Financial Aid Services, and Tutoring Services.


The general public has access to the Perkins Local Application and the Perkins Transition Plan, which are posted on the College’s Internet site. This way the public, including parents, current and future students, and representatives from business and industry, are informed on how the College is serving special population students with Perkins funds.


(6) Provide assurances that the eligible recipient will provide a career and technical education program that is of such size, scope, and quality to bring about improvement in the quality of career and technical education programs;

SWGTC is committed to providing career and technical education programs that are of such size, scope, and quality to enable students to graduate and to be successfully employed in his/her field of study. SWGTC currently offers 84 programs of study (18 associate degrees, 20 diploma, 46 certificates) and 595 courses. Additional programs of study and courses are added each year to meet the needs of the local economy and business and industry within the service area. Enrollment averages 8.46 students per course, a size conducive to effective instruction. A list of SWGTC programs of study and courses is in the College Catalog and may be viewed online at

http://www.southwestgatech.edu/coned/downloads/2007_catalog.pdf.


Each year the College’s programs of study are evaluated according to program expected outcomes, which include Performance Accountability System (PAS) measures. Programs of study must meet enrollment, award, and placement benchmarks to remain open. Each year, SWGTC reviews all programs of study. The results of these reviews are used to terminate, improve, or expand the various programs of study. Students evaluate instructors and instruction of courses on an ongoing basis. All instructors and instruction are evaluated Fall and Spring Quarters. Selected and new instructors or instructors teaching new courses are evaluated Summer and Winter quarters.


(7) Describe the process that will be used to evaluate and continuously improve the performance of the eligible recipient;

SWGTC has a formal annual assessment process in place whereby all units and programs evaluate performance relative to established expected outcomes, and programs also evaluate performance relative to established program student learning outcomes. Included in this process, College units and programs evaluate compliance with the DTAE standards, and programs evaluate performance relative to established performance measures as a part of the DTAE Performance Accountability System (PAS). PAS promotes quality and excellence in technical programs and service units and measures the degree to which the technical colleges within the DTAE system are successful in carrying out their missions. Also, every three years, SWGTC participates in a Performance Accountability Review (PAR) in which an external team evaluates the College, Perkins Improvement Plan activities, and Perkins Budget expenditures.


SWGTC also has Annual Planning and Budgeting and Staff Development Planning systems in place. Each year every functional unit, including those who serve special populations, writes goals, objectives, and activities to be accomplished. At the end of the planning year, these goals, objectives, and activities are evaluated and programs and service units report on resulting improvements. Each member of the faculty and staff establishes a staff development plan.


SWGTC receives an annual data report from DTAE, which summarizes the College’s performance relative to both overall student performance and that of specific special population groups. The College uses this report, in addition to data reports produced quarterly and annually by the Registrar, to monitor progress on an on-going basis. Improvement plans are developed that specify how the College will modify services to students overall and to special populations in order to improve student performance. The Perkins Plan is monitored on a continuous basis by the Perkins Committee.


Each of SWGTC’s instructional programs within the following divisions, Allied Health Education, Business and Computer Technology, Professional Services, and Technical and Industrial Education, has a Local Advisory Committee that is involved in the establishment, evaluation, and improvement of the program of study. Members of advisory committees include a minimum of three members from business and industry that are external to the College, a currently enrolled student, a graduate (when possible), and the instructor(s) serve in an ex-officio capacity. Through formal assessment, students evaluate instructors/instruction in these programs of study on a regular basis. Also, students provide feedback on programs by completing the Student Satisfaction Survey, the High School Site Satisfaction Survey, the Graduate Exit Survey, and the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Employers of graduates also provide feedback on graduates through the Graduate Follow-up Survey. This feedback is considered in improving and/or restructuring programs.


SWGTC has a Perkins Committee made up of personnel who are responsible for services to all students, including services to special population students, and for the implementation of the Act. The Committee meets regularly, not only to develop plans such as the Perkins Local Application and the Perkins Transition Plan, but also to monitor progress in meeting the measure requirements.


(8) Describe how the eligible recipient will—

(A) review career and technical education programs, and identify and adopt strategies to overcome barriers that result in lowering rates of access to or lowering success in the programs, for special populations;

SWGTC maintains its commitment to student success with a comprehensive delivery of services that are accessible to all students including those identified as special population students. The College has an open admissions policy, and the courses and educational programs offered at SWGTC reflect current U.S. Labor Market trends as well as the demands of area employers. Career advisors insure appropriate program placement, and COMPASS and diagnostic testing indicates appropriate academic placement for all students. The College offers learning support courses, tutoring services, and the College Success course, which assist special population students in gaining academic knowledge necessary for admission to desired College academic programs.


A recent substantive change in class offerings provides quality instruction that facilitates barrier-free delivery by providing more on-line classes for those students limited by time and distance, which often include single parents and displaced homemakers. Quarterly meetings of the Perkins Committee are held to review prior quarter data. The newly formed SWGTC Retention Committee is developing a comprehensive Retention Plan to be used to study and promote student success. As a result of tracking data and follow-up survey findings, the College can identify barriers and develop methods of minimizing those barriers, which often affects the special population students. Programs and activities will be expanded for special populations as the College develops new strategies for student success through the retention efforts.


(B) provide programs that are designed to enable the special populations to meet the local adjusted levels of performance; and

The College offers comprehensive programs and activities to special population students, as well as to all other students, in order that students can achieve success. The Retention Coordinator coordinates an Orientation activity to acquaint students with information, services and requirements for being successful at SWGTC. The book loan program provides books to limited income students. On-going career and academic advisement and counseling services are available through Student Services. The LASSI is made available for at-risk students to identify weaknesses or deficiencies in learning habits, study practices and attitudes, and to provide a self-paced method to remediate those deficits. The Retention Coordinator, the College Counselor, and the Retention/Special Population Specialist utilize tracking data to identify those students experiencing difficulty in the classroom.


The College Counselor coordinates services to assist any student with a documented disability, which might present a barrier to their receiving an education. Special equipment needs and services are accessed through the College Counselor. The Retention/Special Population Specialist maintains regular contact with students enrolled in non-traditional programs of underrepresented gender. Workshops, small groups, and individual sessions are presented quarterly covering such topics as study skills, time management, goal setting, internet resources, financial management, and financial aid, which are aimed at student success and especially pertinent to single parents and displaced homemakers.


SWGTC promotes a College Success course, which provides survival skills to new students, Learning Support Services, which offers support classes for students deficient in basic academic skills, and The Tutoring Center, which provides tutoring to any student or potential student requiring academic assistance. The Student Activities Coordinator plans and coordinates student activities, which are open to all students. These activities provide special population students with the opportunity to become actively involved and to be more successful students.


Job placement services and support can be accessed through the Career Services Director who also develops and hosts an annual Job Fair supported by local businesses, industries, and employment agencies. Special population students requiring additional financial support in order to remain in college learn of available part-time or full-time employment opportunities, and potential program completers locate opportunities for employment as a result of this event.


(C) provide activities to prepare special populations, including single parents and displaced homemakers, for high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations that will lead to self-sufficiency;

Programs and activities provided by the College are available to single parents and displaced homemakers. The duties of the Retention/Special Population Specialist were expanded to include these special populations. SWGTC is committed to the success of all students. All special populations have access to assessments, advisement, counseling, workshops, tutoring, group activities, and academic instruction, which prepare them for employment in occupations that lead to self-sufficiency in high skill, high wage, and high demand jobs. The College offers programs that are in demand and provides programs and services to all students. This enables SWGTC to meet expectations of special population students’ success and meet College specific benchmark expectations.


(9) Describe how individuals who are members of special populations will not be discriminated against on the basis of their status as members of the special populations;

Southwest Georgia Technical College is an equal opportunity/equal access College and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, gender, religion, disability, age, political affiliation or belief, veteran status, or citizenship status (except in those special circumstances permitted or mandated by law) in its educational programs, activities, or services. The Title IX Coordinator is Joyce Halstead, Vice President of Student Services; she is located in Building A and can be reached at (229) 225-5062. Dr. Jeanine Long, College Counselor, serves as Section 504 Coordinator; she is located in Building A and can be reached at (229) 227-2668.


Additionally, the Department of Technical and Adult Education and its constituent Technical Colleges do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, gender, religion, disability, age, political affiliation or belief, disabled veteran, veteran of the Vietnam Era, or citizenship status (except in those special circumstances permitted or mandated by law). This nondiscrimination policy encompasses the operation of all educational programs and activities including admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other Department and Technical College-administered programs.  It also encompasses the employment of personnel and contracting for goods and services. The Department and Technical Colleges shall promote the realization of equal opportunity through a positive continuing program of specific practices designed to ensure the full realization of equal opportunity. 


The admissions requirements and procedures established at Southwest Georgia Technical College are not designed to be a hindrance or barrier to enrollment in a program. They are designed to assist the applicant in making a career decision based on such factors as aptitude, ability, interest, background, assessment results, and other appropriate evaluations. They follow the guidelines developed by the State Board of Technical and Adult Education and reflect concern for the applicant’s health, safety, well-being, and ability to benefit from the educational opportunities available.


All students applying to the College must submit an application and $20 non-refundable application fee. Official high school or GED transcripts and all transcripts from any colleges attended for credit are also required. Students with 30 semester credit hours or 45 quarter hours from an accredited college need not submit high school transcripts.


Applicants who have not taken an admissions placement exam (APE) within the last five (5) years will be scheduled to do so. Acceptable SAT, ACT, Asset or Compass scores may be substituted if taken within the last five (5) years. Official notification of acceptance is given to the applicant upon completion of all the above items and at a time that is appropriate for college use.


Persons who seek to enroll at the College and do not satisfy recommended admission standards for regular or provisional admissions are eligible for Learning Support courses. Learning Support courses are offered to enable students to meet required admissions standards. Instruction is offered in the fundamentals of reading, math, and English, thus improving the student’s chance of success upon enrolling in a regular program of study.


Placement into Learning Support courses is determined from the student’s scores on the admissions placement exam. Based upon test results, the student may be recommended to take classes in one, two, or all of these areas.


Applicants have the right to appeal any decision regarding acceptance to Southwest Georgia Technical. Appeals should be made in writing to the Vice President of Student Services of the College upon notification of admission status. The written document must include specific details supporting the appeal.


(10) Describe how funds will be used to promote preparation for non-traditional fields;

The College Recruiter and program instructors work continually to recruit male students into predominantly female programs and female students into predominantly male programs at SWGTC through tours and classroom presentations, career fairs, and program shadow days. Male and female students enrolled in non-traditional programs for their gender appear in advertisements, publications, and presentations promoting the College. “Non-traditional” flyers, brochures, and posters are distributed to the middle and high schools. Perkins funds are used to continue the employment of the College Counselor, Retention Coordinator, and Retention/Special Population Specialist who provide services to students through counseling, orientation activities, workshops and small group activities, and individual contacts. Video and CD programs are utilized by staff to promote and inform students of the opportunities, challenges, and advantages of completing a non-traditional program of study for their gender.


(11) Describe how career guidance and academic counseling will be provided to career and technical education students, including linkages to future education and training opportunities; and

Perkins funds are used to fund a full-time College Counselor position. The College Counselor is available for day and evening students to provide career counseling, academic advising, personal counseling, and crisis intervention. As a Licensed Professional Counselor, the College Counselor has the education, training, and background to assist students in identifying and resolving of personal and career and technical concerns, and coping with emotional crises. The Counselor also refers students to community resources and providers. The Counselor makes recommendations for career and technical planning and lends guidance to academic adjustments for students with disabilities based on career and technical and psychological test interpretations. The Counselor is qualified to administer the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator and the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory as complimentary assessments to career exploration. Also available to students is MCP, an internet based interactive career exploration and education planning program. Students are able to use these multiple resources in making a comprehensive analysis of interests, values, skills and personality that will guide them towards careers that best suit them and prepare for their futures. Self analysis and career exploration helps the student discover the best possible fit in the College setting and start out more focused on their goals.


(12) Describe efforts to improve—

(A) the recruitment and retention of career and technical education teachers, faculty, and career guidance and academic counselors, including individuals in groups underrepresented in the teaching profession; and

SWGTC includes the Equal Employment Opportunity statement on all employee recruitment advertising. The College advertises all position vacancies on the DTAE web-site under Human Resources. Employee recruiting is also accomplished through advertising job openings in local newspapers in the classified sections. SWGTC does not limit recruitment for employees to schools, communities, or companies that are disproportionately composed of persons of a particular race, color, national origin, sex or handicap, except for overcoming the effects of past discrimination.


SWGTC is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, age, political affiliation, belief, or disability in admissions, in employment, or in access to its educational programs and/or activities. The College employs a diverse team of faculty, administrators, and support staff to fulfill its mission.


The College studies demographic information of its service area and of its faculty and staff. The College annually publishes a Labor Market Analysis and College Fact Book, which include demographic information. The following tables provide an overview of gender and race and ethnicity demographics for the service area and for the College faculty and counselor.


^ Number and Percentage Distribution by Gender

Service Area Residents

2000 Census

County/

State

Male

Female




%

Number

%

Number

Thomas

47

20,117

53

22,620

Mitchell

51

12,170

49

11,762

Grady

48

11,245

52

12,414

Georgia

49

4,027,113

51

4,159,340


^ Number and Percentage Distribution by Gender

Full-Time Faculty

Fall 2005

Faculty

Male

Female

%

Number

%

Number

43.1

25

56.9

33


^ Number and Percentage Distribution of Gender

Counselor

Fall 2005

Counselor

Male

Female

%

Number

%

Number

00.00

0

100.00

1


These demographics reveal that the gender of the SWGTC faculty is representative of the College’s three-county service area population. Data indicates that the College employs 3.9%, 4.9%, and 7.9% more female faculty than is represented in the College’s three-county service area. The College employs only one counselor and is not including that position in this discussion.


Number and Percentage of Race and Ethnicity Distribution of Service Area Residents

2004 Census Projections

^ County/

State

White

Black

Other

2 or More

Hispanic/

Latino*




%

Number

%

Number

%

Number

%

Number

%

Number

Thomas

60.0

26,389

38.6

16,958

.81

356

.59

286

1.7

752

Mitchell

51.2

12,210

47.6

11,347

.73

173

.47

108

2.3

543

Grady

68.6

16,655

29.6

7,180

1.3

322

.50

123

8.0

1,950

Georgia

66.4

5,862,978

29.6

2,612,936

2.99

263,966

1.01

89,503

6.8

598,322

*Persons of Hispanic/Latino Origin may be of any race. The percentages and numbers of persons of Hispanic/

Latino Origin are duplicated within races reported for counties and the State in this table.


^ Number and Percentage of Race and Ethnicity Distribution

Full-Time Faculty

Fall 2005

Faculty

White

Black

American

Indian

%

Number

%

Number

%

Number

86.2

50

12.1

7

1.7

1


Number and Percentage of Race and Ethnicity Distribution

Counselor

Fall 2005

Counselor

American

Indian

%

Number

100.00

1



Race and ethnicity demographics of the SWGTC faculty reveal that the College employs 17.6%, 26.2%, and 35% more white faculty than are represented in the College’s three-county service area. The College employs only one counselor and is not including that position in this discussion.


The College is committed to following DTAE Policy (III.B.) in recruiting and hiring in accordance with Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action (I.B.). The College follows DTAE regulations in the recruitment of underrepresented employees. The regulation in I.B. states that “The Commissioner and the Technical College Presidents and all others responsible for recruiting and hiring shall take affirmative action to recruit and hire qualified individuals who are members of federally designated minority groups and/or women and who are underrepresented in the workforce of the relevant hiring unit. The Commissioner and the Technical College Presidents and all others responsible for recruiting and hiring shall notify organizations providing employment assistance to racial minority groups, women, and/or persons with disabilities of employment vacancies and shall otherwise notify those organizations of the Department's Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action policies. Personnel vacancies shall be filled by selecting the best qualified applicant on the basis of merit, whether the applicant is an existing employee or from outside the department. The Commissioner and the Technical College Presidents and all others responsible for recruiting and hiring shall encourage employees to refer candidates who are members of underrepresented groups for existing and future job openings.”

The College provides opportunities for new staff members to become informed about the College and expectations. Orientation is provided for all faculty and staff. This ensures that all employees know what is expected of them. SWGTC understands the importance of the retention of good, quality faculty and staff. SWGTC provides the necessary equipment and supplies in order to provide the best teaching and working environments possible for the faculty and staff. Individual staff development plans are in place for all SWGTC employees, and professional development activities are provided for all employees.


(B) the transition to teaching from business and industry.

SWGTC is conscientious in employing instructors who possess industry-specific expertise. Every effort is made to provide a smooth transition from business and industry into the teaching profession. To facilitate that change, instructors are enrolled in the Faculty Development Institute provided by DTAE. In Phase I, II, and III, instructors learn the skills needed for classroom instruction and student learning. This preparation ensures that instructors are productive and able to execute the requirements of their duties to the best of their abilities.


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