OAKLAND AVIATION HIGH SCHOOL CHARTER“Table of Contents of Legal Requirements”: icon

OAKLAND AVIATION HIGH SCHOOL CHARTER“Table of Contents of Legal Requirements”:


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Methods Of Assessment


Governing Law: The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil outcomes is measured.

--California Education Code Section 47605(b) (5) (C)


Content and Proficiency Standard Assessment Cycle


School culture at OAHS is collaborative, performance-based and data-driven. Teachers, staff, parents and students work together in the spirit of collegiality to set clear goals and objectives for each member of the OAHS community. At every step, data is used to measure how well teachers are teaching and students are learning. To ensure that we catch students before they fail we engage in the content and proficiency assessment cycle. The cycle begins with formative assessments that measure the current abilities of students in comparison to the California state standards and the school-wide benchmarks. It is important to note that assessments are only a measure of a student’s current abilities, not an indicator of student potential. We believe all learning challenges can be overcome through effective effort and strategic student supports. To ensure that all students do learn we engage them in setting clear, obtainable academic goals based on the formative assessments, then we monitor progress, as students grow increasingly competent and independent. Celebrating success, developing each of the multiple intelligences and stimulating each learning style is central to maximizing student academic and personal growth. The OAHS staff likewise uses the assessment cycle to promote better teaching, to identify areas of need (in students and their own teaching) and to seek professional development. The assessment cycle forms a feedback loop that allows each member of the community to monitor how well the school is doing at teaching students, and offers them opportunities to take an active role with clear objectives in promoting student success.


Content and Proficiency Standard Assessment Cycle Table




Assessment




Sources




Used by Teachers to




^ Used by Advisors Families and Students to

Used by Principal to




Leads to




Formative

Assessments will be given on matriculation and at the beginning of each course

^ Summer bridge program, California state standards, school-wide benchmarks, content area teacher teams, interdisciplinary teams

Organize, plan, fine tune lessons and units







Generate personal learning plans, establish need for double Eng or math, clarify what students must to succeed in the course, Set student specific academic goals







^ Monitor cohort progress, establish topics for professional development, to guide goal setting







Class lesson and project design, personal and cohort goals, interim assessments, professional development

Interim Assessments will be given every 4-6 weeks during the course

^ California state standards, school-wide benchmarks, content area teacher teams, interdisciplinary teams




Guide instruction, identify areas that need re-teaching, personalize lessons to the specific needs of the class and individual students

Monitor progress, strategize trouble spots, revise personal learning plans, celebrate successes, set new goals




^ Monitor cohort progress, establish topics for professional development, guide goal setting, coach teachers




Class lesson and project design, personal and cohort goals, interim assessments, professional development, re-teaching, student supports

Summative Assessments will be given at the end of each course and during the standardized testing cycle




California state standards, school-wide benchmarks, content area teacher teams, interdisciplinary teams, CAHSEE, STAR/CAT, PSAT, SAT, ACT, FAA

Re-fine and re-design lessons, recommend student promotion

^ Monitor progress, strategize trouble spots, revise personal learning plans, celebrate successes, set new goals




Monitor cohort progress, establish topics for professional development, guide goal setting, coach teachers




^ Class lesson and project design, personal and cohort goals, interim assessments, professional development, re-teaching, student supports




Formative Assessments


During the “Summer Bridge Program” and at the beginning of each course students will be given a formative assessment of the specific learning objectives of the course. The results of the formative assessments will be used by teachers to organize, plan and fine-tune lessons and units. Formative assessments will be used by students, advisors and parents to clarify the work students must do in order to succeed in the course, and to set student specific academic goals. The Administration will use the results collectively to monitor cohort progress toward school-wide benchmarks and California State content and performance standards.


^ Interim Assessments


Every four to six weeks students will take interim assessments to monitor their progress toward achieving both the learning objectives of the course, and student. Teachers will use the results of interim assessments to guide instruction, to identify areas that need re-teaching and to personalize lessons to the specific needs of the class and individual students. Students, parents and advisors will use results to monitor progress toward personal academic goals, to strategize around areas of difficulty and to guide the development of objectives for student practicums, if necessary. The administration will use the results to identify areas for professional development, to guide teacher efficacy and to monitor school-wide progress toward benchmark skills.


^ Summative Assessments


At the end of each course students will take a comprehensive exam that will summarize the specific learning objectives of the course. Areas of strength and needed improvement will be identified. The results of the summative assessment will be used to determine eligibility for promotion, setting practicum objectives and to monitor progress toward school-wide benchmarks. Teachers will use the results to re-fine and where necessary re-design lessons to increase future student achievement and personal mastery.


Comparison of Assessments




Type of Assessment

What is this assessment?

How do teachers use this assessment?

Daily/Weekly Assignments

Teachers in each subject design and deliver daily and weekly assignments and quizzes that assess students’ daily progress. These assessments include all class work, homework, quizzes, and mini-projects that build knowledge and skill. Each week students will complete a culminating assignment that connects the week’s course work to the school-wide benchmarks and content area learning objectives.

Teachers use the results of daily and weekly assignments to plan better lessons and units and monitor student progress. Teachers also use these assignments to prepare students for all major tests and projects.

Portfolios

Each student will develop a portfolio documenting progress toward individual personal and academic goals, the school-wide grade-level benchmarks for academics and character, the CA State standards. This portfolio will be evaluated twice each year. Portfolios are interdisciplinary and require students to draw connections across the curriculum and apply metacognitive reflection to their own learning and community context.

^ Teachers use this assessment to measure student growth, and the student ability to authentically apply and generalize content area skills and knowledge.

Exhibitions

Exhibitions are live expressions of the student portfolios. They can take many forms, but the key goal is for the

Teachers use this assessment to measure student growth, and student ability to authentically apply and generalize content area skills and knowledge.

California State Tests

The CAHSEE and STAR/CAT are standardized tests required by the State of California and NCLB. These tests are important measures of school success.

Teachers build test-taking skills throughout the year to prepare students to excel on these exams. Teachers use the results of these tests as a measure of student proficiency, to improve teaching and identify potential areas of inequity in the school’s curriculum or delivery.

College Admissions Tests

The SAT I, SAT II, and ACT are standardized tests required by most colleges and universities for admission.

Teachers build test-taking skills throughout the year to prepare students to excel on these exams. Teachers use the results of these tests as a measure of student proficiency, to improve teaching and identify potential areas of inequity in the school’s curriculum or delivery.



^ Daily and weekly assignments


Students will be given a variety of assignments throughout each course. Daily assignments may include readings, short writings, class discussions, projects, and tests and quizzes. At the end of each week there will be a culminating assignment designed to synthesize the lesson elements into a coherent expression of the week’s learning objectives. Both teacher and student will keep daily and weekly assignments as a measure of individual progress, and for inclusion in student portfolios. Teachers will also use assignments collaboratively with other staff to standardize rubrics across disciplines and troubleshoot areas of difficulty. These artifacts become important tools in the development of best practices and data based inquiry.


Portfolios


Students will keep a portfolio that showcases progress toward individual academic goals, and the school-wide grade level benchmarks for each course. Portfolios are personal, interactive and genuine expressions of the personality and talents of each student. They can take many forms, and develop year by year with the student into an assertion of personal and academic growth. Twice each year students will participate in portfolio exhibition. Portfolios are evaluated by a group of no fewer than three teachers, two peers and a parent/community member according to a standardized rubric. Passing scores on portfolios are required for promotion.


^ Portfolio Exhibitions


Exhibitions of student work will be held in the winter and late spring. The exhibition can take many forms including (but not limited to) oral, dance, video, musical or written expressions in front of a live audience. Exhibitions are presented to fellow students, faculty, parents and community members. Exhibitions are a time for students to show off who they have become over the course of the year. Portfolio Exhibitions are evaluated by a group of no fewer than three teachers, two peers, one board member, and a parent/community member according to a standardized rubric based on grade level school-wide benchmarks. Passing scores in both portfolios and exhibitions is required for promotion and graduation.


School-wide outcomes will be measured as follows:




OUTCOME

^ METHOD(S) OF MEASUREMENT

State Content Standards

CAT6, Internal and External Assessments, Teacher Records, Work Samples, Portfolios

Standardized Testing Growth

^ CAT6, CELDT

Attendance

Attendance records

Academic Performance Index ("API”) Growth Target

API Score

Adequate Yearly Progress

As measured by state in accordance with NCLB.



Use And Reporting Of Data


The Charter School will compile and provide to the Oakland Unified School District Board of Education an annual performance report. This report will, at a minimum, include the following data:




  • Summary data showing student progress toward the goals and outcomes listed above.




  • An analysis of whether student performance is meeting the goals specified in above. This data will be displayed on both a Charter school wide basis and disaggregated by major racial and ethnic categories to the extent feasible without compromising student confidentiality.




  • A summary of major decisions and policies established by the Charter School Board during the year.




  • Data on the level of parent involvement in the Charter School's governance (and other aspects of the school, if applicable) and summary data from an annual parent and student satisfaction survey.




  • Data regarding the number of staff working at the school and their qualifications.




  • A copy of the school's health and safety policies and/or a summary of any major changes to those policies during the year.




  • Information demonstrating whether the Charter School implemented the means listed in the charter to strive to achieve a racially and ethnically balanced student population.




  • An overview of the Charter School's admissions practices during the year and data regarding the numbers of students enrolled, the number on waiting lists and the numbers of students expelled and/or suspended.




  • Analyses of the effectiveness of the Charter School's internal and external dispute mechanisms and data on the number and resolution of disputes and complaints.




  • Other information regarding the educational program and the administrative, legal and governance operations of the Charter School relative to compliance with the terms of the charter generally.




The Charter School and Charter School Office will jointly develop the content, evaluation criteria, timelines and process for the annual performance report. The Charter School will use the information compiled in the performance audit to evaluate and improve upon its educational programming as necessary.


The Charter School and Charter School Office will also jointly develop a site visitation process and protocol to enable the District to gather information needed to confirm the school's performance and compliance with the terms of this charter. In addition, the District may inspect or observe the school at any time without prior notice and retains the authority to assign or subcontract any oversight responsibilities if it chooses. Pursuant to Education Code Section 47604.3, the Charter School shall promptly respond to all reasonable inquiries, including, but not limited to inquiries regarding its financial records from the District. The School shall automatically submit all financial reports required under Education Code Section 47604.33 and 47605(m).





^ IV. Governance Structure


Governing Law: The governance structure of the school, including, but not limited to, the process to be followed by the school to ensure parental involvement—California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(D)


Non-Profit Public Benefit Corporation


While the School intends to collaborate with the District, the Charter School shall operate as a separate legal entity, independent of the District. The Charter School will be operated as a duly constituted California nonprofit public benefit corporation, and will be governed in accordance with applicable California Corporations Code Sections and its adopted bylaws which shall be consistent with the terms of this charter. As provided for in the California Corporations Code, the Charter School will be governed by its Board of Directors, whose members have a legal fiduciary responsibility for the well-being of the Charter School.


Pursuant to Education Code Section 47604(c), the District in performing its oversight of the Charter School as required by Education Code Section 47604.32, shall not be liable for the debts and obligations of the School or for claims arising from the performance of acts, errors, or omissions by the Charter School.


Non Profit Board Of Directors


The Charter School will be governed by a minimum of five to a maximum of eleven voting members of a Board of Directors consisting of representatives from OCO, the College of Alameda, the Port of Oakland, an aviator, an educator with administrative experience, parent, a teacher, a finance person and fundraising person. The District may appoint any person to serve on the OAHS Board of Directors and may chose for this person to be either a voting or nonvoting member. Although the Board currently has five members, the Board will expand to nine members once the Charter is approved in accordance with the Charter School’s Bylaws.


The Board will meet on a regular basis, not less than once per month, to make decisions relating to the operations of the school.


The Board of Directors has a responsibility to solicit input from, and opinions of, the parents of School students regarding issues of significance and to weigh the input and opinions carefully before taking action. The primary method for executing their responsibility is the adoption of policies that offer guidance and interpretation of the charter and procedures to assist the staff in facilitating the implementation of such policies.


The Directors will meet regularly and as needed and will be responsible for carrying out Board responsibilities including, but not limited to, the following:




  • Hiring and evaluating the Executive Director/Principal of the School.




  • Hiring, discipline and dismissal of all employees of the Charter School after consideration of a recommendation by the Executive Director/Principal of the School.




  • Approval of all contractual agreements.




  • Approving and monitoring the implementation of general policies of the School. These will include effective human resource policies for career growth and compensation of the staff.




  • Developing and monitoring an operational business plan that focuses on student achievement.




  • Approving and monitoring the Charter School’s annual budget.




  • Acting as fiscal agent. This includes the receipt of funds for the operation of the Charter School in accordance with charter school laws and the receipt of grants and donations consistent with the mission of the School.




  • Contracting an external auditor to produce an annual financial audit according to generally accepted accounting practices.




  • The Board will establish operational steering committees of parents, educators, and art professionals.




  • Regularly measuring progress of both student and staff performance.




  • Involving parents and the community in the support of Charter School programs.




  • Executing all other responsibilities provided for in the California Corporations Code.




  • Development, review, or revision of the Charter School's accountability and mission.




  • Development of the school calendar and schedule of Board meetings.




  • Development of Board policies and procedures.




  • Review of requests for out of state or overnight field trips.




  • Participation in the dispute resolution procedure and complaint procedures when necessary.




  • Approval of charter amendments.




  • Approval of annual fiscal and performance audits.




  • Approval of personnel discipline (suspensions or dismissals) as needed.




  • Appoint an administrative panel to act as a hearing body and take action on recommended student expulsions.




  • Hiring, supervision, evaluation and if necessary, termination of the Charter School’s officers and administration.




  • Creation of external or sub committees as needed, including but not limited to, compensation committee and an audit committee.




The Board may initiate and carry on any program or activity or may otherwise act in any manner which is not in conflict with or inconsistent with or preempted by any law and which are not in conflict with the purposes for which schools are established.


The Charter School shall adopt governance policies, which are aligned with the principles of the Brown Act and the Political Reform Act.


A Board member shall not vote or participate in a discussion relating to a matter in which he/she has a direct personal financial interest. The Board shall adopt policies and procedures regarding self dealing and conflicts of interest.


The Board may execute any powers delegated by law to it and shall discharge any duty imposed by law upon it and may delegate to an employee of the Charter School any of those duties. The Board however, retains ultimate responsibility over the performance of those powers or duties so delegated. Such delegation will:




  • Be in writing;




  • Specify the entity designated;




  • Describe in specific terms the authority of the Board being delegated, any conditions on the delegated authority or its exercise and the beginning and ending dates of the delegation; and




  • Require an affirmative vote of a majority of Board members.




Executive Director/Principal


The responsibilities of the Executive Director/Principal may include, but are not limited to, the following:




  • Attend District Administrative meetings as necessary and stay in direct contact with District regarding changes, progress, etc.




  • Develop Board meeting agenda in conjunction with the Board chair as directed by the Brown act.




  • Make recommendations to the Board on hiring, discipline and dismissal of Charter School employees.




  • Supervise, either directly or through subordinates, all employees of the school.




  • Provide timely performance evaluations of all school employees at least annually.




  • Propose policies for adoption by the Board.




  • Provide comments and recommendations regarding policies presented by others to the board.




  • Communicate with School legal counsel.




  • Stay abreast of school laws and regulations.




  • Approve all purchase orders, pay warrants, and requisitions and, upon approval, forward on for processing.




  • Participate in the dispute resolution procedure and the complaint procedure when necessary.




  • Grant writing.




  • Establish and execute enrollment procedures.




  • Attend meetings with the Chief Financial Officer of the District on fiscal oversight issues once monthly or as otherwise agreed upon.




  • Provide all necessary financial reports as required for proper ADA reporting.




  • Make budget line item revisions when necessary and report changes regularly to the Board.




  • Develop and administer the budget in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.




  • Present a quarterly financial report to the Board.




  • Provide assistance and coordination to the Faculty in the development of curriculum.




  • Oversee parent/student/teacher relations.




  • Attend IEP meetings when necessary.




  • Supervise student disciplinary matters.




  • Coordinate the administration of Standardized Testing.




  • Plan and coordinate student orientation.




  • Attend all Board meetings and attendance as necessary at District Board of Education meetings as the charter representative.




  • Site safety.




  • Foster an amicable relationship between the District and School and facilitate a sharing of resources between both entities.




  • Establish a Communication Model to facilitate communication among all the groups within the School, between the School and the District, and between the School and the community at large.




  • Establish procedures designed to carry out Board policies.




  • Create and appoint committees to assist in the execution of certain planning and administrative functions (known as Officer appointed committees).




  • Scheduling.




  • Manage communications between the District Board and the Board of the Charter School.




  • Develop the School annual performance audit.




  • Present performance audit to the Board of the Charter School and after review by the School Board present audit to the District Board of Education and the County Superintendent of Schools, the State Controller and the California Department of Education.




  • Facilitate open house events.




The above duties may be delegated or contracted as approved by the Board to a business administrator of the Charter School or other employee, a parent volunteer (Only in accordance with student and teacher confidentiality rights) or to a third party provider.


Parent Participation


Partnership with parents is the final design element proven to be essential for successful student outcomes. Orientation for new families will be held in late spring to prepare for the coming school year. Parents and guardians will receive a written description of the OAHS program, including WASC accreditation status, and the transferability of credits to neighboring public schools. OAHS teachers will conduct home visits with the families of students in their advisories twice a year, once in August/September, and once in January/February. An analysis of the student’s proficiency on grade level standards will be shared with the parent/guardian and a personal learning plan will be created to help each student rise to a proficient or advanced level. As part of the personal learning plan, an agreement will be created between the family and the school in which parents, student and advisor share their expectations and commitments to support the student’s success.


Parents will be encouraged to participate in the daily life of the school, and to affirm the educational aspirations of their children. Parents will participate on the governing board, on state and federally mandated committees such as the school site council and the English language advisory committee. Each teacher will have at least two parent leaders to support their advisory. These Parent Leaders will form a Parent Leadership Team that will advise the Governing Board and the Principal of the charter. Parents, principal, teachers and support staff will receive leadership training from Oakland Community Organizations, an affiliate of People Improving Communities through Organizing (PICO) and will work to build a relational culture in the school through the practice of “one to one” visits: ongoing intentional conversations for the purpose of building a culture of trust and respect. The Life Guidelines and Life skills will be shared and practiced by all adults in the school, including parents and guardians. Exhibitions of student work will be held in the winter and late spring. Parents will participate on graduation committees that will evaluate student portfolios and presentations.


OAHS promotes a parent participation program because it views parents as integral partners, not just volunteers. Parents are encouraged to express their concerns, to visit our school and meet with the staff.  To this end, the Charter School shall annually distribute parent surveys to all parents requesting them to give their opinions on the progress of their child and encouraging them to express suggestions of how the school might improve its services. The responses shall be returned to the school and reviewed with faculty and administration in order to address any concerns.

 

Parents are asked to dedicate at least 30 hours per year of participation to benefit the Charter School. To encourage additional parent involvement, the Charter School shall at a minimum do the following:




  • Develop an on going list of extensive participation opportunities for parents.




  • Offer extra curricular activities for both student and parent/family participation.




No student will be denied enrollment nor disenrolled for a failure of the parent or guardian to dedicate thirty (30) hours of participation to the Charter School. However, in all cases, to give the student the maximum opportunity to succeed, the Charter School will work with parent/guardians to consider all possible opportunities for parent involvement.


OAHS may establish other advisory committees to the Charter School Board, such as an English Language Advisory Council (ELAC) and school site council as appropriate.


Staff Participation


During operation, the Charter School will encourage staff members to develop a committee made up of all staff of the Charter School, which will act in an advisory capacity to the Board of the Charter School. This Staff Committee will be governed by bylaws adopted by the staff involved in the staff committee.




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