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Publicly available online at the Smithsonian


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NIST ARCHIVES ORAL HISTORY COLLECTION

TRANSCRIPT/CASSETTE INDEX

Alphabetized by interviewee name. Collection does not circulate; see Reference Staff for access.


Prepared by Myriam S. Dilawari – Information Services Office, RLIP – Revised July 19, 2011




File Drawer

DATE

INTERVIEWEE –


INTERVIEWER

ABSTRACT

CONTENTS


1

8/30/67



^

Alexander, Samuel


Transcript from the 20th Anniversary Conference of the Association for Computing Machinery

On the occasion of the 20th Anniversary Conference of the ACM, Samuel Alexander received the Harry Goode Memorial Award. In the transcript of this meeting, Samuel Alexander reflects on the pioneering contributions he made to the introduction and exploitation of computers in the Federal government. Also contributing to a panel discussion was: George Stibitz, Richard Bloch, John Mauchly, Herman Goldstine, Ed Cannon, Maurice Wilkes, Grace Hopper, Jay Forrester, and Arnold Cohen. Each participant makes comments about the era with which he/she is familiar in the history of the development of the computer.

^ Publicly available online at the Smithsonian: You can find a copy of this transcript here: http://invention.smithsonian.org/downloads/fa_cohc_tr_acm670830.pdf.

The complete Computer Oral History Collection from the Smithsonian is here:

http://invention.smithsonian.org/resources/fa_comporalhist_index.aspx




Transcript: 98 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

1

3/13/69




^ Alt, Franz L. (Dr.)

By: Dr. Uta C. Merzback

Dr. Franz Alt discusses his mathematics/computing career with the U.S. Army at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Aberdeen, Maryland. He collaborated with Derrick Lehmer and Haskell Curry in the Computing Laboratory at NBS and worked on computing firing tables. He discusses relay calculators, Howard Aiken and the design of the Mark II, ENIAC (the first electronic computer), Maurice Wickes who established the first working stored program, and the floating decimal, which was implemented on the Bell Labs relay computers.

^ No signed release on file. Do not use without interviewee permission.




Transcript: 32 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

1

1/23/06

2/2/06

^ Alt, Franz L. (Dr.)

By: Atsushi Akera

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

Oral history interview of Dr. Franz Alt, a former member of NBS and past president of the ACM. Publisher: The ACM New York, NY.




^ Publicly available online at the ACM Digital Library, ACM Oral History Interviews.







Transcript: 89 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

PDF format.

1

11/7/86

^ Ambler, Ernest (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Frederick Fellows

Dr. Ernest Ambler describes the contrasts in administrative styles between Dr. Allen Astin, Dr. Lewis Branscomb, and Dr. Richard Roberts, with the focus on Dr. Roberts. Dr. Ambler discusses the Bureau reorganization in 1978 and the establishment of a program planning, budgeting, and management system at the Bureau.







Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

1

7/7/88

^ Ambler, Ernest (Dr.)

First in a series of three interviews.

By: Karma Beal

Dr. Ernest Ambler discusses his career at NBS during the years 1953-1968. He recalls his work in the Low Temperature Physics Lab under Ferdinand Brickwedde, his parity work with Chien-Shung Wu, the Commerce Gold Metal in 1957, the Fleming Award in 1961, and his move to the Inorganic Materials Division and into administration. He concludes with the publication in 1976 of his book "Looking Back: a 75 Year Preview of Things to Come" on the occasion of the 75th Anniversary of NBS. Dr. Ambler also talks about the Nobel prizes that have been awarded because of the supporting work and experimentation of the Bureau. Release form on file for interviewee (no restrictions). It covers 7/7/88, 7/27/88, and 9/22/88; for the original See the 7/27/88 file.

Transcript: 36 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

1

7/27/88

^ Ambler, Ernest (Dr.)

Second in a series of three interviews.

By: Karma Beal

Dr. Ambler discusses his years as Director of IBS (Institute of Basic Standards). His discusses four major accomplishments – the commencement of the coordinated programs in radiometry and neutron standards, environmental radioactivity projects, flow metering, and radiation safety.

He also shares about his trip to the Soviet Union, the discovery of the Josephson Effect, his appointment as NBS Deputy Director in 1973, and his appointment as Director by Elliot Richardson.

^ Release form on file for interviewee (no restrictions). It covers 7/7/88, 7/27/88, and 9/22/88.

Transcript: 36 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.
















1

9/22/88

^ Ambler, Ernest (Dr.)

Third in a series of three interviews.

By: Karma Beal

Dr. Ernest Ambler discusses his career at NBS during the years 1975-1988. He recalls his nomination by Elliott Richardson and confirmation by Adlai Stevenson. Dr. Ambler considers his two major accomplishments to be the creation of the Engineering Laboratory and the reorganization of NIST at Boulder. He was a U.S. representative to CIPM and a U. S. representative to the Board of Governors of the BIRD Foundation. Through Dr. Ambler’s association with the CIPM, the Bureau accomplished many things -- including the redefinition of the meter, the candela, and the electrical unit. The Malcolm Baldrige Award was initiated under his Directorship through the efforts of Curt Reimann.

^ Release form on file for interviewee (no restrictions). It covers 7/7/88, 7/27/88, and 9/22/88; for the original See the 7/27/88 file.

Transcript: 31 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

1

9/22/81

^ Astin, Allen Varley (Dr.) 1904-1984

First in a series of two interviews.

By: Karma Beal,

Robert Huntoon,

Archibal T. McPherson,

Dr. Churchill Eisenhart,

Richard Franzen,

Laurence Wood, and

Walter Weinstein

Dr. Allen Astin discusses his 37 year career at NBS. He talks about his work in dielectrics and electronic instrumentation, his proximity fuze work with Lawrence Taylor and radiosonde work with his competitor Harry Diamond. He remembers the Directorships of Edward Condon and Lyman Briggs, and discusses their similar goals for the Bureau. Dr. Astin discusses his mission to create the national measurement system, his proposal of the National Institutes of Science and Technology, the implementation of the NBS Standard, the Hot Gas Group, and his intent to improve communication at the lab.

Transcript: 31 leaves; 29 cm.

10 audiocassette tapes and 1- 7” REEL on file.

1

7/12/83

Astin, Allen Varley (Dr.) 1904-1984

Second in a series of 2.

By: Robert S. Walleigh,

Dr. Churchill Eisenhart,

Walter J. Hamer, and

Walter W. Weinstein

This is the second interview with Dr. Allen V. Astin, Director of the Bureau from 1952 to 1969. He discusses the battery additive controversy of AD-X2 and the Bureau’s move from Washington, D.C. to Gaithersburg, MD, in the 1950’s.

Transcript: 70 leaves; 29 cm.

8 audiocassette tapes, 1-7” REEL, and 178 mm. recording tape on file.




2

8/3/98
^

Bailey, William


By: Karma Beal

SEE oral history interview with Fire Research Program. Participants include Alexander F. Robertson [et al.], August 3, 1998.

For transcript

SEE

Fire Research file drawer #4.

2

5/10/87

Barnes, James A. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal

Dr. James A. Barnes, former Chief of the Time and Frequency Division at Boulder, gives an account of his NBS career from 1956-1983. He talks about his continuous involvement with time and frequency standards and other projects he was involved in, including: research on developing new ways of transferring time and frequency and dissemination of standards through radio. Dr. Barnes recalls the differences and similarities between NBS and the Naval Observatory, in providing standard time and frequency services. He also talks about the development of closed-captioning for television and shares anecdotes on the atomic clock.

Transcript: 45 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

2

2/13/01

Baruch, Jordan J.

By: Russell Kirsch

Jordan Baruch remembers his early career of teaching the management of technological change, and his subsequent position as Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Science and Technology during the Carter Administration. Baruch talks about some of the political, economic, and social events the Bureau has been challenged by, i.e., the development of the Data Encryption Standard, the battery additive case, artificial intelligence, and DNA research. Baruch also recalls his relationship with Frank Press, Science Advisor to President Carter, and Bruce Smith's book, “Brookings Institute - American Science Policy Since WWII.” Baruch ends his narrative with a discussion of the importance of the LISP programming language.

Transcript: 19 leaves; 29 cm

1 audiocassette tape and 1 diskette on file.

2

5/12/87

Bender, Peter L.

(Peter Leopold), 1930-

By: Karma Beal

Peter Bender discusses his career in precision measurements at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics in Boulder, Colorado. He talks about his work in optical pumping, working with students at the University of Colorado, and the project to put reflectors on the moon (retroreflector package was included on Apollo XI). Bender discusses his work to test gravitational theory, the Laser Geodynamic Satellite and his interest in geophysical measurements.

Transcript: 8 leaves ; 29 cm

1 audiocassette tape on file.













2

5/12/87

Beehler, Roger E.

By: Karma Beal

Roger Beehler recalls his career in atomic frequency standards at the Time and Frequency Division, Boulder Labs. Beehler discusses the development of the atomic clock and the dissemination of time standards. He recalls the Emmy Award NBS received for its contributions in the television captioning system; the "Relay" satellite that exchanged signals between Washington, D.C. and Europe, allowing measurements to be made at both ends of the length; the GOES weather satellites; the Global Position Satellite system; and the International Atomic Time Scale.

Transcript: 45 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.



















2

5/11/87

Birmingham, Bascomb W.

1925-

By: Karma Beal

Bascomb Birmingham, former Director of Boulder Laboratories, recalls the Cryogenic Engineering Program. He talks about the evolution of the organization, the re-organizations at NBS, and the formation of JILA in 1962. Also, he recalls how the Cryogenics Program that became known for its data center which disseminated information, and talks about major accomplishments including: the conversion of orthohydrogen to parahydrogen; the pioneering effort in the 60's to use high speed turbo expansion machinery using gas lubricated bearings; the total materials and welding analysis for the Alaska Pipeline; the Cryogenic Flow Measurement Facility; and the CARE (Career Awareness and Resource Education) Program.

Transcript: 10 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

2

5/13/87

Birmingham, Bascomb W.

1925-

By: Karma Beal

Bascomb Birmingham, Victor Johnson and Neil Olien discuss the Cryogenics Program in Boulder. They talk about the design and purpose of the hydrogen liquifier, the creation of the Cryogenic Data Center, the dissemination of cryogenic engineering know-how, the bubble chamber, the capabilities of the organization to measure fluid properties, solid properties and slush, the liquified natural gas industry, and both the wet and dry bombs.

Transcripts: 58 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.




2




5/16/73




Blanch, Gertrude (Dr.)

By: Henry Troop




Dr. Blanch discusses her work on the Mathematical Tables Project, her employment at Electroda Corporation; and her Mathieu functions work at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. She also discusses her association with the Institute for Numerical Analysis.




Transcript: 56 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.




2

10/27/65

Blum, William (Dr.)

1981-

By: Wendell Miles

Dr. William Blum, former Chief of the Electrodeposition Section, remembers his distinguished career at NBS from 1909-1953. He recalls his work in analytical chemistry and electrodepositing, and his work with the Chemical Warefare Division during WWI. Dr. Blum also discusses his awards, his memberships in professional societies, and the many lectures he gave on their behalf. Dr. Blum ends with a remembrance of the many personal contacts he made over the years, including his associations with Dr. William F. Hillebrand (NBS), Willis R. Whitney, William A. Noyes, Dr. Glasstone, Neil Gordon (one of the founders of the Journal of Chemical Education), Charlie Parsons, and E.W. Washburn.

Transcript: 121 leaves; 29 cm

3 audiocassette tapes and 1-7” REEL on file.

2

11/10/86

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Fred Fellows

Dr. Edward L. Brady, Associate Director of International Affairs, NBS, summarizes his thoughts on the Directorship of Dr. Richard Roberts. Dr. Brady characterizes Roberts' strengths and weaknesses and his principle contributions to NBS; namely, more formal

Management techniques and the development of a budget and management system. Brady also discusses the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific Information (now NTIS), the management styles of Lewis Branscomb and Ernest Ambler, and the Bureau's most important programs since World War II.

Transcript: 24 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

2

7/14/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Steffen Peiser

Dr. Edward Brady, Associate Director for International Affairs, NBS, discusses the international aspects of his career. Dr. Brady recalls his association with the Atomic Energy Commission in London and Austria, and the BIRD Foundation. Brady recalls his experiences in negotiating agreements for cooperation, and establishing joint projects between the U.S. and foreign countries as preparation for his work at the Bureau.

Transcript: 12 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

2

7/30/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Steffen Peiser

Dr. Edward Brady, Associate Director for International Affairs, NBS, discusses the cooperation between the National Bureau of Standards and the People's Republic of China. In particular, Dr. Brady recalls NBS’ relationship with the Chinese State Bureau of Metrology, which formally began in May of 1979.

Transcript: 10 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.







2

8/5/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Steffen Peiser

Dr. Edward Brady, Associate Director for International Affairs, NBS, discusses the International Bureau of Weights and Measures and the Treaty of the Meter. He also talks about the Pavillon de Breteuil in Sevres, France, the kilogram prototype, the four major publications of the BIPM, the definition of the meter, and the effectiveness of other national standards laboratories.

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

2

8/10/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Dr. David R. Lide

Dr. Edward Brady, Associate Director for International Affairs, NBS, discusses the Standard Reference Data Program. He also talks to Dr. Lide about the Standard Reference Data Act, the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, COSATI (Committee on Scientific and Technical Information, and CODATA (Committee on Data for Science and Technology).

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

2

8/12/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Steffen Peiser

Dr. Edward Brady, Associate Director for International Affairs, NBS, discusses the international aspects of the National Bureau of Standards. He talks about the Treaty of the Meter, budgeting matters regarding the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; the Organic Act; guest workers from other laboratories abroad at NBS vs. research in foreign institutions by NBS staff; and Ernest Ambler's practice to establish contacts with foreign science attaches and counselors.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

2

8/17/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Reeves Tilley

Dr. Edward Brady, Associate Director for International Affairs, NBS, is interviewed by Reeves Tilley, former Chief of the Technical Information and Publications Division, regarding the NBS Publications Program. Brady discusses the National Standards Reference Data Program, its publications, and the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data. He also talks about his chairmanship of WERB from 1969-1987 and NBS publications -- Research Highlights, Technical News Bulletin and Dimensions NBS.

Transcript: 20 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.










2

8/31/87

Brady, Edward L. (Dr.)

By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Steffen Peiser

Dr. Edward L. Brady, Associate Director of International Affairs, NBS, comments on NBS collection of scientific information and the activities of the U.S. intelligence agencies. Brady discusses his relationship with the Director and Deputy Director of NBS and his colleagues. He acknowledges that he was instrumental in helping to set up the Oral History Program with Dr. Huntoon and that he was successful in helping to set up international cooperative activities involving NBS and foreign countries.

Transcript: 8 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.
















3

7/11/88

Branscomb, Lewis M. (Dr.) 1926-

First in a series of three interviews.

By: Karma Beal







Dr. Lewis Branscomb, former director of NBS, recalls his arrival at NBS in 1951, by invitation from Edward Condon, to pursue the measurement of the absorption of light by the negative ion of atomic hydrogen. He discusses his work in Civil Defense with Lauriston Taylor, radiometric calibration research, Herb Broida's free radical project, the 1954 Battery Additive AD-X2 controversy, the special program he set up on failure analysis, his Rockefeller Public Service Award, and Douglas Whitlock, who objected to Bureau efforts to reform the building code system in the U.S. Dr. Branscomb also reveals the important efforts of the Bureau during his tenure --contribution to data analysis; analysis of properties of matter and materials; and the dissemination of that information out to the technical public. He also talks about the Bureau of the 1950's as a unique research environment for the nation, and the integrity of the institute under Dr. Allen Astin.

^ Release form on file for interviewee (no restrictions).

Transcript: 73 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

3

7/12/88

Branscomb, Lewis M. (Dr.) 1926-

Second in a series of three interviews.

By: Karma Beal







Dr. Lewis Branscomb, former director of NBS, recalls the history of JILA in Boulder; being editor of "Reviews of Modern Physics;" his interest in scientific and technical information and his involvement in the High Level Policy Group on this activity; and the creation of CODATA. He also talks about the retirement of Allen Astin and how he was appointed Director of the Bureau. He recalls his association with Maurice Stans and Pete Peterson; his efforts to increase the budget for the Bureau; the organization of the Bureau into Institutes and the individuals he chose to lead them; and his creation of the Precision Measurement Grants Program.

^ Release form on file for interviewee (no restrictions).

Transcript: 21 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

3

7/13/88

Branscomb, Lewis M. (Dr.) 1926-

Third in a series of three interviews.

By: Karma Beal







Dr. Lewis Branscomb recalls the role of ONR at NBS in the 1950's; the Metric Program and Dan Di Simone's role; the International aspects of the Bureau's Programs; the Air Pollution Research Program; the Consumer Product Safety Commission; and the NRA and writing specifications for firearms. He also discusses the reasons for his departure to IBM, the Bureau's constituency, his suggestions for reinventing the Rockefeller Public Service Award, and his hiring of Ed Condon while head of JILA.

^ Release form on file for interviewee (no restrictions).

Transcript: 20 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

3

4/22/81
^

Brickwedde, F. G. (Dr.) (Ferdinand Graft) 1903-


Oral history of Dr. Ferdinand Brickwedde, "On the 50th Anniversary of the Discovery of Deuterium" - a paper presented at the American Physical Society on April 22, 1981.




Dr. Brickwedde presents his recollections on the discovery of deuterium in a speech he delivered at the American Physical Society meeting on April 22, 1981, in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Brickwedde also gives extensive information on his collaboration with Dr. Harold Urey.

Transcript: 17 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

3

3/21/91
^

Brown, Walter E. (Dr,)


d. 1993

By: Karma Beal and

Elio Passaglia

Dr. Walter Brown recalls his arrival at NBS in 1962 and his work in the Dental Research Program with Dr. George Paffenbarger. He discusses his work with calcium phosphate and the contributions that were made with calcium phosphate cement, and a material that he developed to fill in osteoporotic bones.

Transcript: 13 leaves; 28 cm.

No tapes on file.

3

8/8/95
^

Cahn, Ruth Haueter


By: Karma Beal

Ruth Haueter Cahn discusses her career at NBS and her work on the SEAC computer. She talks about her work in "dynamic circuitry" and her associations with Ralph Stutz, Bill Davis, Ida Rhodes, and Sam Alexander. Ms. Cahn also discusses: her work on the design of the out scriber; the fact that most of the engineers working on the SEAC had backgrounds in radio; and the fact that NBS didn't discriminate against women in the computer field.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

3

6/20/86
^

Condon, Edward Uhler


1902-1974

By: Karma Beal




Oral history interview with Churchill Eisenhart, Reeves Tilley, Robert Huntoon, Jacob Rabinow, Lauriston Taylor, and Walter Hamer, remembering Edward Condon - June 20, 1986. Eisenhart, Tilley, Huntoon, Rabinow, Taylor, and Hamer talk about the personal side of Condon, the Bureau's fourth Director (1945-1951). They share many stories that reflect about his intellectual curiosity and his significant impact on the Bureau. Some of their recollections include: his recruitment of Churchill Eisenhart, Lewis Branscomb, and many others. Condon would wander through Bureau labs on the weekends; he thought the Bureau should publish a handbook on physics and he wrote 17 chapters. He was an extraordinary and extemporaneous speaker. The Condon Award was established in honor of his excellent writing ability. He expanded the library and was responsible for the creation of the NBS Report Series.




Transcript: 69 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

3

6/8/88
^

Cook, Richard K. (Dr.)


First in a series of two interviews.

By: Karma Beal

Dr. Richard Cook came to NBS in 1935, and began his career studying vibration in airplane wings and calibrating proving rings, testing machines, and strain gauges. Dr. Cook recalls Louis Tuckerman and the invention of the strain gauge in the 1920s; his acoustic proximity fuse work during the war; his work in solid state physics and ultrasonics at Bell Labs; and his work at NOAA in geoacoustics. Dr. Cook also recalls Harry Diamond Labs and the work in acoustic minds on land, his assignment to the Director's Office as Special Assistant in Acoustics, the Noise Control Act and the anechoic chamber at NBS. Dr. Cook ends with highlights of the awards he received.




Transcript: 31 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

3

10/5/88
^

Cook, Richard K. (Dr.)


Second in a series of two interviews.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

3

7/29/87
^

Creitz, E. Carroll


By: Karma Beal

E. Carroll Creitz of the Gas Chemistry Section at NBS discusses his career at the Bureau. He came to the Bureau in August of 1927, and began calibrating volumetric glassware. He worked in the Gas Chemistry Section until 1958, and then participated in the project to seal the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Creitz discusses the publicity, anecdotes, and state-of-the art techniques used to accomplish the task.

He also recalls the 10 years he spent in Fire Research at NBS.

Transcript: 35 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

3

8/3/88
^

Creitz, E. Carroll


See Fire Research Program at NBS.

Drawer-File No. 4







3

5/6/03
^

Davis, Ruth M.


By: Lisa Greenhouse

Oral history interview of Ruth M. Davis at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, May 6, 2003. Closed interview.

File copy is preliminary, edited version by ISD only, not reviewed by interviewee. No signed release on file.

Do not use without interviewee permission.

Transcript: 17 leaves; 29 cm. 2 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.

3

5/12/87
^

Dunn, G. H. (Dr.)


(Gordon H.) 1932-

By: Karma Beal

Dr. Gordon Dunn arrived at NBS in 1961, as a NRC postdoc research associate. He worked under Dr. Lewis Branscomb in the Atomic Physics Section on a project to measure photo dissociation of hydrogen molecular ions. Dr. Dunn remembers the move to JILA in 1962, and the establishment of the Visiting Fellows Program. Dr. Dunn explains the government of JILA; the synergism between the astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics groups; and the Memorandum of Understanding in 1976 that broadened the work of JILA. Dr. Dunn also recalls his ion trap and colliding beams work, his tenure as Division Chief of the Quantum Physics Division, and the funding for JILA and its collaborative efforts with LASP (Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics) and NOAA.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 8 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

3

5/29/85
^

Eisenhart, Churchill (Dr.)


By: Joan Rosenblatt,

Mary Natrella,

Joseph Cameron,

Reeves Tilley, and

Karma Beal

Dr. Churchill Eisenhart joined NBS in October 1946, and organized the Statistical Engineering Laboratory, where he was Chief from 1947-1963, and Senior Research Fellow from 1963-1983. He came from the University of Wisconsin in 1945, after Dr. Condon was appointed Director of NBS. He immediately was assigned to teach Modern Statistical Techniques at the Bureau's in-house educational program. Dr. Eisenhart discusses research in the Statistical Engineering Lab, his recruitment of Jack Youden, his participation in the battery additive experiments, his experience as Chair of the Editorial Committee, and the launching of the measurement assurance programs. He also talks about the mission and future of the newly organized NBS Alumni Association, Harry Ku, the statistical problems work on fundamental constants, his editorship of the Journal of Research, and his membership in the Hot Gas Group.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

PDF format

3

8/15/91
^

Eisenhart, Churchill (Dr.)


By: Ingram Olkin

This oral history is taken from an interview Dr. Churchill Eisenhart conducted for the "Statistical Science" journal. Eisenhart reflects on his education at University College in

London and his instructors Neyman and Fisher. He talks about his teaching career in the Mathematics Dept. in Wisconsin and his work for the Statistical Research Group at Columbia. Eisenhart was recruited by Dr. Condon to implement a more modern statistical and mathematical program at NBS. Eisenhart discusses some of the projects he worked on including: the sampling and test procedures of the Specifications Section at the Bureau, the core sampling of bale wool, a body measurement study, the automotive battery study, and his paper "On the Fallacy of Treating the Worst." He ends with a review of the positions he held at NBS.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 37 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

3

3/23/71
^

Elbourn, Robert D.


By: Richard R. Mertz

Robert Elbourn recalls his involvement in NBS's computer research and development activity during the late 1940's.




He also discusses Jack Rabinow's development of the magnetic fluid clutch, the EDVAC prototype of the serialized machine, and the pioneering effort of the all AC coupled machine.

Transcript: 65 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

4

5/14/87
^

Fickett, Fred W. (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Fred Fickett discusses his arrival to NBS in 1967, as a post doc in the Cryogenics Division of the Superconductor and Magnetic Measurements Group in Boulder. He explains his studies in the fundamentals of metals and his work on copper Fermi surface. He talks about his work on the low temperature properties of metals and alloys and in superconductors; measuring magnetic properties of materials like fiberglass, epoxy, brass, and aluminum; developing a low temperature data base on all the properties of copper at low temperatures; George Free's eddy current work; and the projects he worked on for the INCRA (International Copper Research Association).

Transcript: 14 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

4

6/29/09
^

Fields, Richard (Dr.)


By: Sam Lowe,

Jack Rush,

Jack Coriell,

David Lide, and

Hans Oser

Oral History interview of Dr. Richard Fields, formerly with the Metallurgy Division in MSEL (Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory), NBS. Hans Oser was Field’s first supervisor when he joined NBS as a post doctoral fellow.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 86 leaves; 29 cm.

CD-R in MP3 format. Total time: 1hr., 58 min., 14 sec. 2 copies of CD on file. Word & PDF formats.

4

8/3/88
^

Fire Research Program


By: Karma Beal

Alexander Robertson, Harry Shoub, Daniel Gross, E. Carroll Creitz, Marjorie Sandholzer, William Bailey, and James V. Ryan discuss the Fire Research Program at NBS/NIST. Interviewees remember the many research efforts they participated in - "burnout" studies, resistance of concretes to jet engine exhaust, Air Force project on flash fires, Coast Guard project on motorboat fire extinguishers, sodium bicarbonate research, "powder bag experiments" for the Naval Ordnance Lab, study of the kinetic properties of propellants and explosives, the testing for relative flammability on various types of fabrics, mathematical modeling and combustibles, the work for Gypsum Association on steel-joisted floors, and load failure.

Transcript: 45 leaves; 29 cm.

3 audiocassette tapes on file.

4

4/13/83
^

Fox, Margaret R.


By: James Ross

Margaret Fox discusses her work in the computer group at NBS during the 1950s. She talks about the UNIVAC, SEAC & DYSEAC machines, and her associations with Sam Alexander and Ida Rhodes. She recalls the first Computer Conference in Philadelphia, in 1951, and the first International Conference in Paris, in 1959. There is an informal review of some of her personal papers and computer artifacts, a discussion of the lack of publication and dissemination of information outside of NBS, and a description of the close, informal relationship between government and industry during the 1950s.




Transcript: 39 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

4

11/4/05
^

Gary, Thomas


By: David Lide, Hans Oser, Harriet Hassler,

Sam Kramer, Joyce Brown, and Mike Stogsdill.

Oral history interview of Thomas Gary, November 4, 2005.




^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 87 leaves; 29 cm. 2 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.

4

5/12/87
^

Gebbie, Katharine B. (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. Katharine Gebbie discusses the JILA Program (a joint institute between NBS and the University of Colorado and one of the largest concentrations of atomic physicists and astrophysicists in the country). She describes the working environment of JILA - the NBS components, the University personnel, the grad students and post docs.

She also describes funding and gives her impression of the interactions of the program with industry, NBS and other government agencies, and the entire scientific community. Dr. Gebbie summarizes the work of the Quantum Physics Division and talks about the Visiting Fellows Program.

Transcript: 23 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

4

11/25/70
^

Greenwald, Sidney


By: Richard R. Mertz,

Smithsonian

National Museum of American History

Oral history interview of Sidney Greenwald with Richard R. Mertz; conducted at the Rabinow Division of the Control Data Corporation in Rockville, Maryland, on the November 25, 1970. Mr. Greenwald describes his early training, experience, and education with some indication as to how he eventually got involved with computing machines. Repository: Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

^ Publicly available online at the archivescenter@si.edu; Computer Oral History Collection, 1969-1973, 1977.

Transcript: 74 leaves; 29 cm.;

No tapes on file

PDF format.

4

5/11/87
^

Herbstreit, Jack W.


By: Karma Beal

Jack Herbstreit discusses his 35-year career in radio propagation at the Central Radio Propagation Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. He talks about investigating the frequencies for air navigation in the U.S. (part of the Cheyenne Mountain Project), studying the range, reliability and accuracy of low frequency loran, the allocation of FM radio broadcasting stations, and TV stations in the U.S. He also discusses the impact of CPRL on telecommunications in the U.S., his involvement as Director of the Consultative Committee on International Radio for 8 years, the importance of the International Telecommunications Union, and the contributions of Ken Norton.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm. 2 audiocassette tapes.

4

5/4/05
^

Heydemann, Peter L. M.


By: David Lide, Jack Colwell,Ralph Hudson,

Walter Leight, Hans Oser, and Harriet Hassler

Oral history interview of Peter Heydemann. Includes additional autobiographical sketch submitted by the interviewee. Editing still in progress by SAA (Standards Alumni Association) and the interviewee. File copy is preliminary, edited version by ISD only. Not reviewed by interviewee. No signed release on file. Do not use without interviewee permission.

Transcript: 47 leaves; 29 cm. 1 CD-ROM and 2 audiocassette tapes. Word and PDF formats.

4

7/27/07
^

Hill, James E.


By: David Lide,

Noel Raufauste,

Gregory Tassey, and Richard Wright

James Hill recalls his career at NIST during the years 1972-2007. He served as the acting Deputy Director of NIST from the summer of 2006 until his retirement in April 2007.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 43 leaves; 29 cm. 1 audiocassette tape. Word and PDF formats.

4

10/29/82
^

Hilsenrath, Joseph


By: Joseph Cameron and W. Reeves Tilley

Joseph Hilsenrath discusses his long and distinguished career at NBS. He recalls his work in the Thermodynamic Tables Project where he developed the OMNITAB software system. He also recalls his contribution to the training programs at NBS - in particular, the Post Doctoral Program. Hilsenrath ends his interview with a discussion of the efforts which led to the establishment of electronic typesetting operations at NBS.

Transcript: 4 audiocassette tapes and 1-7” REEL on file.







4

5/14/87
^

Hoer, Cletus A.


(Cletus Anthony) 1933-

By: Karma Beal

Cletus Hoer reviews his career in the Microwave Metrology Section of NBS in Boulder. He began his work in the Magnetic Materials Group and then started working with Impedance Standards. His projects included: inductive voltage devices, high power directional couplers, and a six port device for improving measurement. He won a Gold Medal for the 10 gigahertz design. Hoer also worked on the Josephson Junction, and worked on developing new induction standards. Hoer ends with a discussion of the companies that marketed some of the high power couplers his group developed; the cryogenics standard and the effect that superconductors had on his research; and some thoughts on a long-range project to make and evaluate a power standard.

Transcript: 9 leaves; 29 cm. 1 audiocassette tape.

4

5/8/03

5/23/03

6/9/03

7/21/03



^

Hoffman, John (Dr.)


By: Hans Oser, Lisa Greenhouse, and Ralph Hudson.

Dr. John Hoffman discusses his long career at NIST. His career spanned the years 1954 to 1982, during which time he was in various leadership positions, including Director of the Institute for Materials Research and Director of the National Measurement laboratory.

Filed copy is preliminary. Edited version by ISD only. Not reviewed by interviewee. No signed release on file. Do not use without interviewee permission.

Transcript: 147 leaves; 29 cm. 7 audiocassette tapes. Word and PDF formats.

4

5/25/06
^

Horowitz, Emanuel


By: David Lide,

Jerome Kruger,

Curt Reimann,

Harry Hertz, and

Harriet Hassler.

Emanuel Horowitz first came to NBS on December 26, 1951.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.




Transcript: 47 leaves; 29 cm. 2 audiocassette tapes on file. Word and PDF formats.

4

9/7/98
^

Hudson, Ralph P. (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. Ralph Hudson remembers his low temperature work in the Heat Division from 1951-1980. He describes John Pellam's work on the properties of liquid helium II; the investigation of the magnetic properties of paramagnetic salts work; his work with Ambler and Temmer to study nuclei with a magnetic cooling technique; Olin Luke’s work with the super-conductivity program and tin crystals; Herb Broida's technique for storing free radicals in highly excited states; Hudson's Silver Medal for his contributions to an improved helium vapor pressure scale; his parity work with Ambler, Hayward, and Hoppes; and the Stratton Award and Gold Medal for this work.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcripts: 21 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

4

3/5/81
^

Humpreys, Curtis J.


(Curtis Judson)

By: Tape presented to NBS by CJH.




Curtis J. Humphreys, Chief of the Radiometry Section during the 1940s, gives an historical account of the Spectroscopic Program covering the NBS and Corona Labs experiences. He discusses Dr. Coblentz and the inventions that revolutionized the techniques of radiometry and spectrophotometry. He also recalls the Ridberg Centennial Conference – 1954, as the most distinguished group of spectroscopic and atomic physicists ever assembled (group included Niels Bohr). He discusses the two main features of the spectroscopic program at NBS and credits the Corona program with the establishment of the atomic wavelength standard in infrared.

Transcript: 19 leaves; 29 cm.

4 audiocassette tapes on file.

5

10/27/80
^

Huntoon, Robert D. (Dr.)


(Robert DeWitt) 1909-

By: Dr. Churchill Eisenhardt,




Richard Franzen, and

Walter Weinstein




Dr. Robert Huntoon, former Deputy Director of NBS under John Astin, discusses the Bureau years between 1951 and 1976. Huntoon begins his discussion with the Fuze Program during WWII and the collaborative efforts of NBS staffers. He then remembers the Condon era, Secretary of Commerce for Science - J. Herbert Holloman, and John Astin's idea to create a conglomerate of institutes like NIH at the Bureau. Huntoon relays the efforts to improve communication at NBS; discusses the "Hot Gas" group; Wednesday night bull sessions; and his visits around the Bureau one afternoon a week. He reveals his difficulty with defining NBS’ mission (in those days) since it was growing and the scientists felt its mission was to do basic research. Huntoon defines major achievements during this time as: Deslatte's fundamental constants, the defining of the kilogram, the rubber program, digital computer work, and cryogenic research in industry.




Transcript: 92 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes and 1-7” REEL on file.

5

6/18/92
^

Huntoon, Robert D. (Dr.)


(Robert DeWitt) 1909-

By: Walter Weinstein,

Joseph M. Camerson

Steffen Peiser

Dr. Robert Huntoon, former Director of NBS, reflects on the National Measurement System. He discusses the types of measurements involved in the system; the criteria used in deciding which areas the Bureau should go into; the Bureau's role in maintaining a master station; and providing leadership for the system.

Transcript: 49 leaves; 29 cm.

8 audiocassette tapes, and 2-7” REELs on file.

5

6/76
^

Huskey, Harry D. (Dr.)


By: Christopher Evans

Dr. Harry Huskey recalls that his interest in automatic computing began in 1944, while teaching mathematics at the Moore School, University of Pennsylvania. He became involved with the technical description of the ENIAC and eventually transferred to the National Physics Lab in England, to work on the ACE project. He later applied to NBS when the agency started computer activity in California. He was involved in the contracting of a computer for the U.S Census Bureau; and helped to start up the SEAC, initially called the NBS Interim Computer. Huskey also recalls his work to build a Williams tube-type computer and predicts the PC and hand-held computer device.

Transcript: 35 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

6

2/11/98
^

Jacox, Marilyn E.


By: Karma Beal

Marilyn Jacox begins her discussion with her early interest in science, her education in chemistry and physics, her teaching position at the Mellon Institute, and her 15 year collaboration with Dick Milligan. She recalls her work in free radicals at NBS/NIST, including F-atom reactions in solids and H-atom detachment and acetylene; her mandate to build a laboratory in 1962, upon her arrival at NBS; the Arturim Leonardi Prize, which she shared with Dick Milligan; and the Infrared Spectroscopy Glidden Conference.

Transcript: 26 leaves; 29 cm.

8 audiocassette tapes on file.

6

2/18/98
^

Jacox, Marilyn E.


By: Karma Beal

Marilyn Jacox discusses the many awards she received during her NBS/NIST career. The awards include: Utica College Outstanding Alumnus Award; Physical Sciences Award from the Washington Academy of Sciences; the Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award; the Federal Woman's Award; the Stratton Award (with Dick Milligan) for ion studies; the Lippincott Award; the Hillebrand Prize of the Chemical Society of Washington; the WISE Lifetime Achievement Award; and the Syracuse University honorary ScD. Jacox also talks about changes she observed in the organizational structure of NBS/NIST during her career. Jacox recalls the 1964 reorganization, her time as Section Chief of Photochemistry, and John Lyons’ reorganization in 1991.

Transcript: 10 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

6

9/8/98
^

Johnson, Donald Richard


1922-

By: Karma Beal and

James Schooley

Don Johnson discusses his start with NBS as a NRC fellow, working for David Lide, in molecular spectroscopy. He also remembers his time in the Program Office, and the reorganization of the Boulder Labs. Dr. Johnson also discusses his duties as the Chief of Staff for the Undersecretary of Commerce, and the development of CARB - a joint venture of NBS and the University of Maryland.

Transcript: 20 leaves; 28 cm.

4 audiocassette tapes and 1 diskette on file.

6

7/9/82
^

Jones, Sarah Ann


By: Walter Weinstein and

Charlotte Moore Sitterly

Sarah Ann Jones recalls her 28-year career as Chief of the NBS library. She became the second director of the library in 1938, following the retirement of Dr. Aristide Fanti. Jones discusses the close relationship between the library and the scientific and administrative staffs at NBS that led to the creation of a premier physical sciences library. She tells stories of the developing library, including her collaboration with Ruth Hooker and the NRL Library. Their mutual cooperation led to a sharing of resources and a plan to advise the Office of Strategic Services on how to obtain the French and German periodicals that were published during WWII.

Transcript: 45 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape and 1-7” REEL on file.

6

4/14/94
^

Kamper, Robert


By: Karma Beal

Dr. Robert Kamper discusses his arrival at Boulder Labs in August of 1963, and his work in superconductivity. He also discusses the Bureau reorganizations in 1974 and 1978. Dr. Kamper recalls his position as Division Chief in the Center for Electronics and Electroengineering and the work that was conducted in microwave calibration studies, microwave metrology, lasers, optical fibers and superconductivity. He discusses the great improvement of the voltage standard that occurred while he was Chief, along with all of the standards that the Bureau wrote for superconductors. Finally, he recalls some of the problems that he encountered as the Boulder Labs grew and expanded into the surrounding community.

Transcript: 23 leaves; 28 cm. 3 audiocassette tapes on file. Word and PDF formats.

6

10/8/70
^

Kirsch, Russell A.


By: Dr. Richard Mertz

Russell Kirsch describes his work at NBS, his early background and training, and what led him into the field of computers.

Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm. 1 CD-ROM on file.

PDF format.

6

1/13/95
^

Kirsch, Russell A.


By: Karma Beal

Russell Kirsch describes his career at NBS that began in the Digital Computer Lab, under Sam Alexander, in 1951. He recalls his first assignment to develop input/output devices for the SEAC; his writing of the first artificial intelligence program; and the construction of the first DYSEAC computer at NBS. Kirsch also recalls demonstrating the first real-time computing and real-time interrupting program, and founding the computer image processing field. He describes his sabbatical in 1957, at MIT and Harvard, and subsequent founding of the field of Syntactic Pattern Recognition. He concludes the interview by reviewing the many agencies that the Bureau helped to use computers over the years.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 7 leaves; 29 cm. 1 CD-ROM and 1 audiocassette tape on file.

PDF format.




6

5/15-16/

1987
^

Kline, Gordon M. (Dr.)


By: Jeffrey L. Meikle

Dr. Kline begins by discussing his work at NBS during the 1930’s, where he focused on applications of organic resins to aviation. This is followed by a discussion of his work as head of the Bureau’s Organic Plastics Section and as Technical Editor of Modern Plastics. A lengthy section of the interview is devoted to Kline’s experiences in Germany in 1945 and the investigation of German plastics laboratories, plants, and processes. The next major portion of the interview describes his experiences as an administrator of the Division of Polymers at NBS and his role in setting national and international standards for testing synthetic polymer products. The interview concludes with a brief discussion of his education at Colgate University and at the University of Maryland.

Transcript: 49 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

6

1/27/05
^

Kramer, Samuel


By: David Lide, Elaine Bunten-Mines, Richard Wright, Tom Gary, Hans Oser, and Harriet Hassler.

Sam Kramer remembers his career at NBS/NIST, from 1970 until his retirement in January 1997.

^ Release on file restricts the use of this interview. Does not circulate. Do not use without interviewee permission.

Transcript: 86 leaves; 29 cm. 3 audiocassette tapes on file. Word and PDF formats.

6

6/7/88
^

Kushner, Lawrence (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. Kushner remembers his career at NBS, as a physical chemist, from 1948-1980. He began his work in the Surface Chemistry Section studying surface active agents, then switched to the Metallurgy Division and established a metal physics group. He talks about his involvement in the Commerce Science and Technology Fellowship Program as a Special Assistant to Dr. Holloman; his time as Deputy Director under Branscomb; and his time as Director of IAT. Kushner also discusses the importance of the Experimental Technology Incentives Program, the Fire Research Program, and the building research at NBS. He ends with his Chairmanship of the Scientific Research Society of America; his association with Sigma Xi; the stability and set of values that Ernest Ambler provided the Bureau; and his exciting work as a bench scientist while Condon was Director.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 17 leaves; 29 cm.

4 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

10/8/69
^

Lehmer, Derrick Henry (Dr.)


By: Dr. Uta Mezbach

Dr. Lehmer discusses his early years in computing at the University of California at Berkley and the Bureau’s support of these activities. He discusses the first machine he built in the mid 1920s; the early development of the analog computer; and the successful publishing of the journal - Mathematical Tables and Aids to Computation.

Transcript: 20 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

7

4/18/73
^

Lehmer, Derrick Henry (Dr.)


By: Robina Mapstone

Dr. Lehmer discusses his numerical analysis and computing career at the University of California at Berkley. He also recalls his war work in 1941, the ENIAC machine he was in charge of at the Ballistics Research Lab in Aberdeen, his Directorship of the Institute for Numerical Analysis, and his 10-year editorship of Mathematical Tables and Other Aids to Computation.

Transcript: 27 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

7

3/3/98
^

Linteris, Gregory (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. Linteris discusses his work with fire suppressants and microgravity research at NIST. He gives an extensive account of his application and acceptance into the NASA Space Flight Program, and his training and work as a payload specialist astronaut onboard the Space Shuttle.

Transcript: 22 leaves; 28 cm.

4 audiocassette tapes and 1 diskette on file.

7

3/21/91
^

Little, C. Gordon (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal and Elio Passaglia

Dr. Little discusses his education in radio astronomy and his work at the Geophysical Institute, where he developed the riometer. He also talks about his career in CRPL at Boulder, Colorado. He describes a young staff and a vibrant research organization in Boulder. He describes the divergent philosophies in the organization about what was required to advance the understanding of the propagation of radio waves. Dr. Little describes “his” management style, and that of Fred Brown, his mentor.

Transcript: 11 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.




7

6/1/93
^

Lyons, John W. (Dr.)


First in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal







Dr. Lyons discusses his start as a physical chemist at Monsanto. He talks about his work with phosphorous as a fire retardant and the publication of his book, “The Chemistry and Uses of Fire Retardants.” K. Willenbrock hired Dr. Lyons in 1973, as Director for the Center for Fire Research at NBS. Dr. Lyons discusses the shift from consumer product technology to energy research at NBS, to helping American industry with technology. He also recalls managing the National Engineering Laboratory under Dr. Ernest Ambler; the start of the AMRF (Automated Manufacturing Research Facility) at NBS, and the establishment of the Manufacturing Technology Centers and the Advanced Technology Program.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 17 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

6/4/93
^

Lyons, John W. (Dr.)


Second in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal




Dr. Lyons discusses the challenges of strengthening NBS’ computing and statistics labs during the 1980s. He discusses the Center for Electronics and Electrical Engineering and the development of the optical communications program. He also recalls the Center for Building Technology program and the thermophysical properties work in the Chemical Engineering Labs. Dr. Lyons also outlines the philosophy of the National Engineering Lab - to have NBS findings adopted as good engineering practice, and ensure that basic research is the foundation of all applied programs. He indicates that the success and growth of NEL led to NIST.

Transcript: 19 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

6/9/93
^

Lyons, John W. (Dr.)


Third in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal




Dr. Lyons discusses the transition from NBS to NIST, highlights the Competitiveness Act, and the name change to identify technological help to industry as well as standards maintenance. He also discusses the organization of the labs and being replaced as NIST Director.

Transcript: 13 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

6/16/93
^

Lyons, John W. (Dr.)


Fourth in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal




Dr. Lyons begins with a discussion of Michael Faraday, noting his many contributions to science and his interest in technology transfer and outreach. He continues with a mention of his collaboration with Gerard Piel and the Scientific American magazine. Dr. Lyon’s main topics center on a discussion of his Facilities Initiative for the Gaithersburg and Boulder sites, and the establishment of the ATP, MTC, MEP and STEP programs. He concludes with a glimpse of his relationship with John Sununu.

Transcript: 17 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

6/21/93
^

Lyons, John W. (Dr.)

Fifth in a series of five interviews.


By: Karma Beal




In his 5th and final interview, Dr. Lyons discusses NIST and the European Common Market. He also discusses the importance of his participation in the international ANSI Board meetings. He recalls NIST’s 90th birthday celebration, the excellence of the Standards Alumni Association, and a number of building disasters and other controversies that NIST was called upon to analyze.

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

11/3/86
^

McCoubrey, Arthur O.


By: Karma Beal and

Frederick Fellows

Arthur McCoubrey, former Director of the Institute for Basic Standards, recalls his career in measurement-related activities at the Bureau. He remembers his early assignment to study the state of research at NBS, discusses the management style of Richard Roberts, compares NBS to the national labs - PTB and NPL, and discusses NBS’ mission to realize measurement units for the country and provide opportunity for scientific research at NBS.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

7

11/3/89
^

Mann, Wilfred


Sixty Years In and Out of Physics – Nov. 3, 1989

No transcript.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

7

3/31/71
^

Marden, Ethel (Mrs.)


By: Dr. Richard R. Mertz

Ethel Marden discusses her mathematics and computer science career at NBS. She recalls her work with the SEAC computer, developing software, and training staff. She also remembers her work with Sam Alexander and her eventual position as Chief of the Systems Research and Development Division.

Transcript: 44 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

7

1/28/98
^

McMurdie, Howard F.


1905-

By: Karma Beal

Howard McMurdie discusses his 38-year career at NBS. He arrived in 1928 and began work in the Lime and Gypsum Section. Mc Murdie recalls his work in x-ray diffraction, dry cells, jewel bearings, phase equilibria and Portland cement. He also talks about his research in the Glass Section, making synthetic quartz, and his work in the Polymer Division, investigating various rubbers and wool fibers. At the end of the interview he discusses the work of Weir and Van Valhenburg, and the history of the diamond cell. He also gives his impressions of the various Directors he served under, the buildings at the "old site" in Van Ness, the Senior Lunch Club, and women in the early days of the Bureau.

Transcript: 32 leaves; 29 cm.

5 audiocassette tapes and 2 diskettes on file.

PDF format.

8

6/8/79
^

Paffenbarger, George C.


First in a series of four interviews.

By: Martha Ross

Dr. Paffenbarger discusses his work in dental research at NBS during the 1920s and 1930s, his beginnings as a summer student under Dr. Souder, the collegial atmosphere at the Bureau, and the specification program he started for testing dental materials.

Transcript: 25 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

8

6/18/79
^

Paffenbarger, George C.


Second in a series of four interviews.

By: Martha Ross




Dr. Paffenbarger discusses the relationship among the manufacturers, the dental professions, and the federal government in the dental research program at NBS. He also describes how the American Dental Association became involved in the Dental Research Program at the Bureau. He also recalls how the researchers at NBS transferred their developing efforts to the dentists in the field, the work he did to expose fraud, and the work he accomplished in the Navy Dental Corps during the war.

Transcript: 34 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file

8

6/27/79
^

Paffenbarger, George C.


Third in a series of four interviews.

By: Martha Ross







Dr. Paffenbarger discusses the trip he made to England, Austria, Germany, and Sweden in 1936, investigating the status of dental materials research in those countries. He also discusses the personal relationships he developed on this trip, including those with Dr. Joachim Paffenbarger in Berlin, Dr. Jacob Spanner in Pforzheim, Germany, and Dr. Geyer of the German Dental Association. Paffenbarger recalls his experiences in the Far East in Japan, the Philippines, and Hong Kong, including his time as a visiting professor at Nihon University, Japan. Lastly, he spends some time discussing the first international dental specification ever promulgated for amalgam.

Transcript: 42 leaves; 28 cm.

No tapes on file.

8

7/3/79
^

Paffenbarger, George C.


Fourth in a series of four interviews.

By: Martha Ross







Dr. Paffenbarger discusses the practice of dentistry at the turn of the century. He also discusses the administration of the Dental Section of NBS, immediately before and after WWII. Paffenbarger ends his discussion with a summary of the impact of NBS work on the dental profession, including the development of the countra-angle turbine handpiece, the panoramic x-ray machine, EBA cements, and composite filling material.

Transcript: 34 leaves; 28 cm.

No tapes on file.

8

7/19/88
^

Passaglia, Elio (Dr.)


First in a series of two interviews.

By: Karma Beal




Dr. Elio Passaglia recalls his education and industry experience prior to his arrival at NBS. He highlights his career at NBS, beginning with his work in the Division of Organic and Fibrous Materials. During the reorganization of 1962, he became Chief of the Polymer Physics Section, and collaborated on a very popular ellipsometry textbook. He also discusses his relationships with Drs. Robert Huntoon, Allen Astin, Earl Schoonover, Rob Thompson, and Ernest Ambler. Passaglia talks about the joint efforts between NBS and NIH, the laser and high temperature materials work in the ARPA program, his Visiting Professorship at the University of Colorado, and his important work in the Flammable Fabrics Program.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

8

7/26/88
^

Passaglia, Elio (Dr.)

Second in a series of two interviews.


By: Karma Beal




In this second interview, Dr. Elio Passaglia discusses the change in direction of the ARPA program to laser and high temperature materials; the Branscomb years and the changes in the character of the Bureau; the Metallurgy Division’s work in metal physics; his work in underground corrosion and on the Alaska Pipeline; the NASA contract making perfect crystals; Passaglia’s involvement in materials policy; the Shops Policy Committee at the Bureau; and the corrosion study involving NBS, the Navy, and Battelle.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

8

4/19/85
^

Peiser, H. Steffen (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal,

Dr. Karl Kessler,

Dr. Howard Sorrows,

and Thomas Murphy

Dr. Steffen Peiser recalls NBS’ involvement in international science. He also talks about his work in the Free Radical Program and the Mass and Scales Section of NBS. Peiser discusses his time at Harvard University, the guest worker program at NBS, his involvement in the Vietnamese Bureau of Standards, and his leadership role in the IUPAC.

Transcript: 64 leaves; 29 cm.

4 audiocassette tapes on file.

8

3/3/03
^

Porter, George


By: Norm Belecki,

Reeves Tilley, and

Lisa Greenhouse

George Porter, former head of the Personnel Division of NBS; interviewed by Norm Belecki, former Chief of the NIST Electricity Division, Reeves Tilley, former Chief of Technical Publications at NBS and Lisa Greenhouse, NIST historian.




Transcript: 17 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes and 1 diskette on file.

8

11/23/70
^

Rabinow, Jacob


By: Richard R. Mertz

This is an interview conducted on the 23rd of November 1970 in the Rockville, Maryland Office of the Rabinow Division of Control Data Corporation with Dr. Jacob Rabinow.

^ No signed release agreement on file.

Transcript: 173 leaves; 29 cm. and index. Paper copy only. No tapes on file.

8

8/12/82
^

Rabinow, Jacob


Dictated by Jacob Rabinow in his home.

Jacob Rabinow discusses his career at NBS. He arrived in 1938 and began rating water current meters. He describes the genteel atmosphere of NBS and Washington, DC, at the time. During the war he designed safety mechanisms for fuzes, and was prolific inventor (230 U.S. patents, 70 foreign). He talks of his many patents including: the servo-driven arm on the phonograph; the self-regulating watch; the magnetic particle clutch; and his 15 patents for the Post Office. Rabinow served as a member of the Patent Committee at the Bureau in the early 70s. He left the Bureau twice to start his own companies, only to return and finally retire in 1975.

^ No signed release agreement on file.

Transcript: 25 leaves; 29 cm. 4 audiocassette tapes on file. PDF format.

8

5/14/87
^

Reed, Richard (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. Richard Reed remembers his metallurgy work at the Boulder Labs in Colorado. He recalls his work in the Properties of Solids at Cryogenic Temperatures group; their work in phase transformations, fracture and deformation research; the failure analysis work for the Alaska Oil Pipeline, and the Hyatt Regency walkway collapse in Kansas City; the exchange program between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. to test techniques for cryogenic temperatures; and study of the low temperature properties of steels.

Transcript: 24 leaves; 29 cm. 1 audiocassette tape on file.

PDF format.

8

4/9/07
^

Reimann, Curt


By: David Lide

Harry Hertz

Hans Oser

Curt Reimann discusses his different careers at NBS/NIST from October 1962, until his retirement in 1995, including heading the Baldrige Award effort.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 47 leaves; 29 cm. 2 audiocassette tapes on file. Word and PDF formats.

8

3/21/73
^

Rhodes, Ida (Mrs.)


By: Henry Tropp

Mrs. Rhodes remembers the origin of the Math Tables Project and her involvement in this WPA program to help out of work mathematicians. She also recalls her collaboration with Gertrude Blanch during this time, and being sent to NBS to learn about computers, after the war. Rhodes discusses her work in developing the UNIVAC and SEAC computers.

Transcript: 78 leaves; 9 cm.

No tapes on file.

8

8/24/88
^

Robertson, Alexander (Dr.)





Dr. Alexander Robertson, former Chief of the Fire Protection Section, discusses the NBS Fire Program from 1950-1969. He recalls the events that led to the development of fire research at NBS; Allen Astin's interest in the program; the Flammable Fabrics Act of 1953 and 1967; the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act; and the Fire Research and Safety Act. Robertson also highlights individuals associated with the program including: E. Carroll Creitz, Dr’s. Shoen & Eberhardt, Dr. Howard Emmons, and Dr. John Rockett. He ends his discussion with a list of some of the accomplishments of the program.

Transcript: 21 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

8

8/24/88
^

Robertson, Alexander (Dr.)


Summary of Dr. Robertson’s work experience.










Transcript: 15 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

8

8/3/88
^

Robertson, Alexander (Dr.)


For transcript and tapes See Fire Research Program, August 3, 1998, drawer No. 4.







8

7/29/88
^

Rockett, John (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. John Rockett begins his recollections by highlighting his education in aerodynamics and his work at Pratt and Whitney, United Aircraft and Factor Mutual. He then describes the history and contributions of the Fire Program at NBS. He also discusses the Fire Research and Safety Act, the Fabric Flammability Program, the Fire Services Programs, the research in wood cribs and fire models, his associations with John Lyons, Bernie McCaffrey, J. Herbert Holloman, and the NBS/NFPA relationship.

Transcript: 15 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

PDF format.

8

8/3/98
^

Ryan, James V.


By: Karma Beal

For transcript and tapes See Fire Research Program, August 3, 1998, drawer No. 4.




9

5/11/87
^

Sanders, Aaron (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Aaron Sanders remembers the optical electronics programs at the NBS Boulder. He comments on the many projects he was involved in including: the development of standards for lasers; establishing a measurement services program; optical fibers work with Gordon Day, Doug Franzen, and Bruce Danielson; and work on gaseous electronics. Sanders also discusses the efforts in the standardization of length, fundamental constants, safety thresholds for lasers, the work on voltage sensors, and developing very fast detectors.

Transcript: 27 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

9

6/3/81
^

Schoonover, Irl (Dr.)


By: E. E. Brady

Dr. Irl Schoonover, former Deputy Director of NBS, reflects on his 41-year career.

He discusses his ideas for the Bureau as a civilian-industrial research institute and a National Institute of Measurement. He also discusses the management style of Condon, and his relationship with Herbert Hollomon. Schoonover remembers his interest in updating the international critical tables, encouraging industrial countries to take part in making standard reference materials, the dental research program and NBS’ participation in ANSI. He ends with reminiscences of the many people he encountered during his time at NBS -- Harold Stimson, Bill Baker, Lewis Branscomb, Dr. Coblentz and William Meggars.

Transcript: 63 leaves; 29 cm.

6 audiocassette tapes on file.

9

5/20/81
^

Schubauer, Galen B.


By: GBS.




Galen Schubauer discusses his 38-year career in aerodynamics research at NBS. He highlights his work in the wind tunnels developing equipment for measuring turbulence, using the hot-wire anemometer; investigating the effectiveness of damping screens in reducing wind-tunnel turbulence; and measuring wind pressure on models of buildings. Schubauer also recalls his work during WWII, determining the aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft bombs and mortar shells. In 1946, he became Chief of the Aerodynamic Section and the division renewed its emphasis on fundamental research on boundary-layer flow and turbulence.

Transcript: 15 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

9

2/24/03
^

Scribner, Bourdon F.


By: Lisa Greenhouse

Bill Martin, and

David Lide

Bourdon Scribner, former Chief of the Spectrochemistry division, discusses his career at NBS, including working with Dr. William Meggers, his testimony before Congress on the AD-X2 battery additive, and his visits to the Bureau when his father, Bourdon W. Scribner, worked at NBS.

Transcript: 19 leaves; 28 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes and 1 diskette on file.

9

9/18/02
^

SEAC

By: Russell Kirsch,

Ruth Cahn,

Robert Elbourn, and

Sidney Greenwald


SEAC (Standards Electronic Automatic Computer) oral history interview - September 18, 2002. NBS built the first automatic computer with an internally stored program in the United States. The SEAC did its first productive computer in April of 1950, at NBS.

^ Signed release agreements from Russell Kirsch and Sidney Greenwald with no restrictions are on file.

Transcript: 26 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file. Word and PDF formats.

9

2/18/06
^

SEAC video


By: Russell A. Kirsch

SEAC (Standards Electronic Automatic Computer). History of SEAC Presented by Russell A. Kirsch, National Institute of Standards and Technology. Members of the Team (builders of SEAC, the first programmable computer in America, built at NBS (NIST) in 1950: Ruth Hauter Cahn, Robert Elbourn, Sidney Greenwald, and Russell Kirsch. The transcription for this video was done by Russell A. Kirsch on 7/1/2011. The URL for this video is:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8352103944986064288#

Transcript: 24 leaves; 29 cm. + 1 CD 51 minute video

9

8/15/96
^

Sengers, Johanna M.H.


Levelt (Anneke)

First in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal, John Gallagher, and Ray Mountain




Anneke Sengers discusses growing up in Amsterdam, her childhood interest in science, her education in physics and chemistry, and her PhD work. She relates her move to the University of Wisconsin, her return to Professor Michaels’ lab, marriage to Jan Sengers, and her eventual return to the U.S. with letters of recommendation from Jan de Boer, introducing her and Jan to Ralph Hudson at NBS. There are many references to the work she was doing, including the communal entrophy problem, hydrogen liquifiers, the Burnett apparatus, learning Omnitab, and calculating the quantum levels for argon, neon, nitrogen, etc.

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

6 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.




9

10/9/96
^

Sengers, Johanna M.H.

Levelt (Anneke)


Second in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal, John Gallagher, and Ray Mountain

Second in a series of five interviews.




Transcript: 15 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.

9

11/5/96
^

Sengers, Johanna M.H.

Levelt (Anneke)


Third in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal, John Gallagher, and Ray Mountain

Third in a series of five interviews.




Transcript: 15 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.

9

12/11/96
^

Sengers, Johanna M.H.

Levelt (Anneke)


Fourth in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal, and Ray Mountain

Fourth in a series of five interviews.




Transcript: 14 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.

9

1/7/97
^

Sengers, Johanna M.H.

Levelt (Anneke)


Fifth in a series of five interviews.

By: Karma Beal, John Gallagher, and Ray Mountain

Fifth in a series of five interviews.




Transcript: 14 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

Word and PDF formats.

9

8/3/98
^

Shoub, Harry


See Fire Research Program at NBS Aug 3, 1998.

File drawer #4.

9

5/20/93
^

Simpson, John A


By: Karma Beal

John Simpson discusses his career at NBS, which included work in electron physics, metrology, and manufacturing. He recalls his efforts in designing and building an electron interferometer, his “cool electrons” work with Chris Kuyatt, contributions to x-ray spectroscopy under Hugo Fano’s direction, and Russ Young’s scanning tunneling microscope. Simpson also recalls his time as Acting Chief of the Mechanics Division and his task to revolutionize the division. He talks about the 1978 reorganization of the Bureau and his contributions to the AMRF program.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 18 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes and 1 diskette on file. 1 tape dated Sept 12/89.




9

1/27/81
^

Sitterly, Charlotte Moore (Dr.)


By Dr. Karl Kessler and Walter Weinstein

Dr. Charlotte Moore Sitterly, an international authority on atomic spectroscopy, astrophysics and the solar spectrum, discusses her career at NBS. The highlights include -- her association with Dr. Henry Russell at Princeton, her work on the Multiplet Table of Astrophysical Interest, and her work on the atomic energy levels program at NBS.

Transcript: 34 leaves; 29cm.

2 audiocassette tapes, 1-7” REEL, and 178 mm recording on file.

9

6/76
^

Slutz, Ralph (Dr.)


By: Christopher Evans

Dr. Ralph Slutz recalls the origin of his interest in computers, his work on the Princeton Project at the Institute for Advanced Study with John Von Neumann, helping to build the ENIAC computer, and finding an opportunity to help build the NBS Interim Computer. He discusses his work in designing and building input/output devices, computer circuitry and vacuum tubes, and the SEAC, as the first stored program machine in the U.S.

Transcript: 13 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.




9

11/30/82
^

Snyder, Wilbert F.


By: Kenneth Armstrong

Wilbert Snyder remembers his 15 years of work in NBS’ sound section, during the 1930s. He also recalls his work in the Central Radio Propagation Laboratory, beginning in 1946. Snyder discusses his publication “Achievement in Radio: Seventy Years of Radio Science and Measurement at the National Bureau of Standards,” and the major contributions of NBS during WWI.

Transcript: 28 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

9

6/83
^

Snyder, Wilbert F.


By: Kenneth Armstrong

Oral history interview (June 1983).

1 sound recording tape 35-90, 1-7” REEL, and 178 mm audio tape on file.

Transcript: 27 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.




9

12/10/86
^

Sorrows, Howard E.


By: Karma Beal

Howard Sorrows discusses the administrative styles of Dr. Richard Roberts, Dr. Lewis Branscomb, and Dr. Ernest Ambler. He recalls Roberts as someone who came from industry and tried to install modern management techniques at NBS. Lewis Branscomb had an intellectual leadership style with a superior knowledge of science and technology. Ernest Ambler placed a high priority on substance, relied on his own scientific judgment, and was like a manager of a prestigious old line company. Sorrows also discusses the leadership style of Edward Condon and reveals the specials projects he worked on for Richard Roberts, and the working relationship he had with him.

Transcript: 31 leaves; 29 cm.

4 audiocassette tapes on file.

10

6/2/82
^

Stimson, Harold


By: Edith R. Corliss,

Walter W. Weinstein

Harold Stimson remembers his 42-year career in heat measurement at NBS. He recalls the properties of ammonia work that was going on when he arrived in 1916; his work with Ginnings on the properties of water; the work he did on proximity fuzes; and the work of Guildner, Johnson and Jones on the triple point of water. Included in this oral history are many personal reminiscences between all of the participants, including Corliss's memory of the AD-X2 controversy.

Transcript: 31 leaves; 29 cm.

7 audiocassette tapes and 2-7” REELs on file.

10

9/18/82
^

Stimson, Harold


By: Edith Corliss

Interview on 9-18-82 at Stimson’s home.

No paper copy of transcript.

1 audiocassette tape on file.







10

10/31/07
^

Taylor, Barry


By: David Lide,

Norman Belecki,

Edwin Williams, and Ralph Hudson

Barry Taylor recalls his career at NIST from June 1970, until his retirement in March, 2001.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.










Transcript: 77 leaves; 29 cm. 2 audiocassette tapes on file. Word and PDF formats.

10

2/20/85
^

Taylor, Lauriston


By: Dr. J.C. Villforth

An interview of Lauriston Taylor by Dr. J. C. Villforth, February 20, 1985.

Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 45 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

10

12/11/86
^

Taylor, Lauriston


By: Karma Beal and
Nelson Kellog

Lauriston Taylor discusses his career in the NBS proximity fuze and x-ray programs. He also talks about the ramifications of the AD-X2 controversy, the Kelly Committee, and its recommendation to rid the Bureau of the Ordnance Labs. Taylor recalls the NBS project accounting system, the move to Gaithersburg, and his relationship with Harry Diamond.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 88 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

10

4/10/90
^

Taylor, Lauriston


By: Elio Passaglia

Lauriston Taylor discusses the effects that the loyalty oaths and security clearances had on the Bureau prior to, and during, the McCarthy era. Elio Passaglia talks about the information he is gathering to write a chapter in his book (A Unique Institution) on McCarthyism. Taylor begins and ends this history with reflections on Edward Condon and some of the problems he faced, and why he left the Bureau.

^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 16 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

10

11/9/82
^

Tilley, W. Reeves


By: Louis E. Barbrow,

Churchill Eisenhart, and

Walter W. Weinstein

W. Reeves Tilley, former Chief of the Office of Technical Information and Publications, remembers his 34-year career at NBS. He discusses the Summary Technical News Service, the Technical News Bulletin (which became the official spokesman of NBS), Dimensions NBS, STR news releases, and Technical Highlights. Tilley also recalls the remarkable growth of the Bureau during his tenure, due, in part, to the refurbishing of existing NBS report series, the establishment of the Technical Note Series, Consumer Information Series and the FIPS, expansion of the Journal of Research, and improved Technical News Bulletin. Tilley discusses his relationships with Astin, Branscomb, Roberts and Ambler, and recounts some of his many accomplishments - an effective conference program, initiation of NBS electronic photocomposition program, revision of the Communications Manual, and the success of major open houses.

^ Release on file restricts the use of this interview. Does not circulate. Do not use without interviewee permission.

Transcript: 25 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes, 1-7” REEL, and 178 mm recording on file.

10

5/29/53
^

Tuckerman, Louis B.


Speech

Louis B. Tuckerman’s Speech of May 29, 1953. Chief of Engineering at NBS.







Transcript: 9 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

10

3/22/10
^

Wachtman, Jack (Dr.)


(John B. Wachtman)

By: David Lide,

Edwin Fuller,

Sheldon Wiederhorn and Hans Oser.




Oral history interview of Dr. John Wachtman. He had an active career in the Material Science area of NBS, the predecessor of NIST. Dr. Wachtman first joined NBS as a bench scientist. He spent thirty-two years at NIST, beginning in 1951.




^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 83 leaves; 29 cm. + CD-ROM.

3 original audio

CDs + 3 copies on file. PDF, vdf, and txt files.

10

2/4/2010
^

Wachtman, Jack (Dr.)


(John B. Wachtman)

Disk containing the final version of the interview with John Wachtman, plus a memoir from him that he wants to put in the record. Signed release agreements are on file.

1 CD-ROM (12 cm.) on file.

10

11/5/86
^

Walleigh, Robert S.


By: Karma Beal and

Dr. Frederick Fellows

Robert Walleigh talks about Dr. Branscom’s, Dr. Roberts’, and Dr. Ambler’s administration at the Bureau.

Transcript: 13 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

10

10/17/66
^

Weaver, Elmer


By: Windham Miles

Elmer Weaver remembers his work in the Chemistry Division of NBS under Dr. Hillebrand. He discusses the project to establish standards for public utilities and his involvement in gas utilities. Weaver also recalls his war work on lighter-than-air craft - balloons and dirigibles and their gases (hydrogen and helium). He also recalls his association with the Chemical Society of Washington and his patents on balloon gases.

Transcript: 11 leaves; 29 cm.

1 audiocassette tape on file.

10

11/7/86
^

Willenbrock, F. Karl (Dr.)


By: Karma Beal

Dr. F. Karl Willenbrock, former Director of the Institute for Applied Technology (IAT), discusses the different management styles and working relationships he had with former Bureau heads, Lewis Branscomb and Richard Roberts. He also recalls the important aspects of the National Engineering Laboratory; the important, industrially oriented research of the AMRF; the building industry in the U.S.; the Fire Research Program; and the work he did to implement the metric system in the U.S. He also talks about “Project Breakthrough,” an effort of HUD to introduce new technology into the building industry; and the top projects of IAT over the past 40 years, including the Fire Safety and Control Act, the Center for Manufacturing Engineering, the work done in the Center for Product Safety, and the program to improve the energy efficiency of buildings.

^ OK to release per email approval on file.

Transcript: 13 leaves; 29 cm.

2 audiocassette tapes on file.

10

11/6/78
^

Wood, Lawrence A. (Dr.)


Speech

Dr. Lawrence Wood talks about his memories of the synthetic rubber program at NBS, between 1936 and 1956. He recalls his work with Norm Bekkedahl; the first International Rubber Technical Conference in 1938; visiting the Leverkusen laboratories in Germany to observe their synthetic rubber program; his association with Jesse Jones (then Secretary of Commerce); and the start up of the national Rubber Program in 1942.

Transcript: 5 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.

10

1/10.2011
^

Wright, Richard N. (Newport)


By David Lide,

Jim Gross,

Dave Didion,

Hans Oser

Oral history interview of Richard N. Wright, formerly the director of the Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) at NIST. January 10, 2011.




^ Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 84 leaves; 28 cm. + 2 CD-ROMS (12 cm.)

10

1/30/78
^

Wyckoff, Harold O. (Dr.)


By: Lauriston S. Taylor

Dr. Harold Wyckoff’s interview is part of the series “Vignettes of Early Radiation Workers.” He joined the X-ray section of NBS in 1941, and dedicated his career to the safe and accurate applications of radiation in medicine. He discusses getting the million-volt plant for direct current into operation, the major study of diagnostic x-ray equipment testing for the Army during WWII, the comparison of U.S. and European standards in the ionizing radiation field with the National Physical Laboratory in England, and his Chairmanship of the ICRU.

Signed release agreement with no restrictions is on file.

Transcript: 14 leaves; 29 cm.

No tapes on file.







23






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