Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics icon

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics


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Course Evaluation:

Assignment 20%+exam 10%+final exam (close book) 70%.

Textbook:

Online textbook.

List of Recommended References:

David Arnow, Scott Dexter, Gerald Weiss. ^ Introduction to Programming Using Java: An Object-Oriented Approach, 2/E.


Requirement Engineering


Course Code: College: International School of Software

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Yang Jing (China)

Course Content:

1. Course objectives:

Examine the state-of-the-art for research & practice in Requirements Engineering; Gain practical experience in selected RE techniques; Understand the essential nature of RE.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Introduction: What Are Requirements?; 2) What Is Engineering? Managing Risk; 3) Feasibility Studies; Stakeholders, Goals, Scenarios and Boundaries; 4) Elicitation Techniques; Systems Thinking; 5) Introduction to Requirements Modelling; Modelling Enterprises; Modelling Stakeholders’ Goals and Business Processes; 6) Modelling Objects; Modelling Relationships; ER and Class Diagrams; 7) Modelling State; Modelling Events; 8) Modelling Interactions; Non-functional Requirements; Use Cases and Sequence Diagrams; 9) Requirements Specifications; Verification and Validation; 10) Prioritizing Requirements; Software Evolution; 11) Software Architecture; 12) Course Review; 13) Project Presentation; 14) Final Tutorial; 15) Flexible Week.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Lectures: 12 lectures; Tutorials: 6 tutorials; Presentation: 1 final presentation.

^ Course Evaluation:

Assignment 1 10%, Assignment 2 10%, Assignment 3 20%, Assignment 4 20%, Final Project+Studio Presentation 30%, and Attendance 10%.

Textbook:

Easterbrook, S. M. and Nuseibeh, B. A. Fundamentals of Requirements Engineering, 2003.

^ List of Recommended References:

Fowler, M., Scott K. UML Distilled (3rd Edition). Addison-Wesley, 2003.


User-Centered Design and Testing


Course Code: 0800021 College: International School of Software

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Deng Juan (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The purpose of SSD4 is for students to: 1) Learn to design usable, human-friendly user interfaces (UIs); 2) Learn to evaluate interface usability empirically with two usability tools; 3) Learn to create interfaces and interface prototypes using a rapid-prototyping programming language.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Unit 1: Overview of User-Centered Design and Testing; 2) Unit 2: Interfaces: Creating with Visual Basic, Evaluating with Usability Heuristics; 3) Unit 3: Think-aloud Usability Testing; 4) Unit 4: Programming beyond Controls.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

This course combines a component that teaches programming interactive user interfaces with one that teaches methods to improve the usability of those interfaces. The course proceeds from the view that interface usability is essential to successful software design and not merely a matter of “packaging” or aesthetics. Interface usability in fact can have a critical impact on an application’s overall quality and effectiveness: an accurate, fast, and powerful application can be rendered useless by a poorly-designed user interface when the people who might otherwise benefit from the application find the interface frustrating, difficult, or impossible to use.

The course is organized into four units. Each unit consists of a series of topics and includes multiple-choice quizzes, practical quizzes, and a few extended exercises, all of which will help you gain a solid understanding of the material. In addition, the course features three in-class exams.

Course Evaluation:

Quiz and exam.

Textbook:

SSD4: User-Centered Design and Testing (Carnegie Mellon University).

List of Recommended References:

1. Diane Zak. Programming with Microsoft Visual Basic .Net (2nd Edition). ISBN: 0-619-21718-9. Course Technology, 2005.

2. J. Nielsen. Usability Engineering. ISBN: 0-12-518406-9. Academic Press (AP Professional), 1993.


0503 Civil Engineering and Architecture

Soil Mechanics---Basic Theories and Engineering


Course Code: College: School of Civil Engineering

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Andrew Brennan (UK)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This module is intended to introduce the core knowledge and understanding of the mechanics of soils. It will cover the basic concepts of soil behaviour and common approaches required for the design of commonly encountered geotechnical engineering systems (both pure soil and composite). A range of different processes employed to facilitate the construction of geotechnical engineering systems and methods of monitoring the performance of these systems both during and following construction will also be presented. On completion of the module the student should have the knowledge to analyse a variety of types of foundation systems and retaining structures and be able to conduct straightforward designs.

2. Major teaching content:

The indicative contents of the module are:

Introduction, soil constituents and descriptions, phase relationships, effective stress, compression, shear strength, deformation, permeability and seepage, soil stress-strain analysis; Mohr's circle; triaxial test; consolidation theory; slope stability; earth pressure and retaining structures, the critical state concept; ultimate limit state design of shallow foundations; ultimate limit state design of deep foundations; elastic stress distribution; settlement of foundations; foundation systems and earth retaining structures.

^ Course Evaluation:

Exam.

Textbook:

Craig's Soil Mechanics (7th Edition).

List of Recommended References:

Smith's Elements of Soil Mechanics.


0504 Water Conservancy and

Hydraulic Engineering

Groundwater Hydrology


Course Code: 08001184 College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Spring Intended Student: Undergraduates from Department of Irrigation and Drainage and Department of Hydrology and Water Resource

^ Credit: 1.5 Instructor: Yang Jinzhong (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objective:

This course is concerned with the theory and practice of groundwater hydrology. By learning this course, students can understand the dynamic characteristic of groundwater from the basic principle of hydrological cycle. Students can also preliminarily evaluate groundwater resources and understand the potential environmental problems coupling with groundwater resource exploitation, and make the basis for their future work or research on groundwater resource exploitation and management.

2. Major teaching content:

Formation and storage of groundwater; Hydrological cycle of groundwater; Groundwater movement; Groundwater recharge and discharge; Groundwater resources evaluation; Groundwater quality and groundwater environment; Management of groundwater.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Multimedia teaching, exercises, discussing in class.

Course Evaluation:

Regular grade 40%, final exam grade 60%.

Textbook:

Zhang Weizhen. Groundwater Hydrology and Groundwater Regulation. China Water Power Press, 1998.

List of Recommended References:

1. Shu Longcang. Groundwater Hydrology. China Water Power Press, 2009.

2. Wang Dachun. Basic of Hydrogeology. Geology Press, 1986.

3. Chen Nanxiang. Engineering and Hydrological Geology. China Water Power Press, 2007.

4. Lei Zhidong. Soil Water Dynamics. Tsinghua University Press, 1988.

5. Qin Yaodong. Soil Physics. High Education Press, 2003.


Surveying Principles and Applications


Course Code: 0800577 College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2.5 Instructor: Deng Nianwu (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Surveying Principles and Applications is a major course of College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering. The course can help the students to understand the basic principles and conceptions of surveying, to be familiar with the basic structure and usage of surveying instruments, to understand how to make and use topographic map, and understand the applications of surveying in water resources and hydroelectric engineering. The course can train the students’ ability of analyzing and solving some questions of surveying, and cultivate the students’ team spirit. As a result, the important significance of adapting the future work will be achieved.

2. Major teaching content:

Surveying Principles and Applications includes the principles of surveying, direct leveling and trigonometric leveling, horizontal angles and vertical angles measurement, distance measurement (taping and electronic distance measurement), directions, global positions, control surveys, topographic surveying and mapping, construction surveys, and also includes the new instruments, new technologies and new methods: geographic information systems, remote sensing, close-range photogrammetry and 3D laser scanning.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Multimedia technologies (including images, graphics, videos, simulators, etc.) will be used to explain the basic principles and basic concepts of surveying, the basic structure and usage of the measuring instrument, the applications of surveying in water resources and hydroelectric engineering. Experiment practices are achieved by the students at the same time; the teaching methods are very beneficial to the students.

^ Course Evaluation:

Written examination.

Textbook:

Barry F. Kavanagh, Seneca College Emeritus. Surveying Principles and Applications (7th Edition). Prentice Hall.

List of Recommended References:

Deng Nianwu. Surveying (2nd Edition). China Electric Power Press.


Engineering Geology


Course Code: 216008 College: School of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering

^ Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering

Credits: 2.5 Instructor: Chen Yifeng (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This class is concerned with those geological factors that influence the location, design, construction and maintenance of hydraulic engineering works. It introduces students to the basic concepts and analysis methods in geology, helps students more fully understand geological phenomena and their influences on engineering practices, and promotes logical skills and improved problem solving ability.

2. Major teaching content:

The class is projected over 10 weeks and is divided into two modules.

1) Module One (first five weeks) focuses on the foundations of engineering geology. It includes: 1) rock-forming minerals, rock types, and the engineering characteristics of rocks; 2) geological structures (geological history, folds, faults, discontinuities, geological maps); 3) groundwater(porosity and permeability, the origin and occurrence of groundwater, aquifers, aquicludes and aquitards, flow through soils and rocks, hydrological maps); 4) geological processes (fluvial process, weathering, karst topography, earthquake); 5) engineering geological characteristics of rock masses.

2) Module Two (second five weeks) will concentrate on the geological problems in reservoirs, rock foundations, slopes and tunnels. It includes: 1) seepage losses and assessments from reservoirs; 2) stability analysis of dam foundations; 3) stability analysis of rock slopes; 4) stability analysis of tunnels.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Class meeting will be mostly lecture oriented, together with unscheduled teaching for identification of mineral and rock samples and a one-weak field training in Zigui County.

^ Course Evaluation:

A student’s grade will be based on two common exams, class participation on assignments/attendance grade, and a cumulative final exam. Grades will be assigned based on the following percentages: common exam 1: 10%; common exam 2: 10%; class participation on assignments/attendance: 10%; final exam: 70%.

Textbook:

There is no textbook for the class; instead, material is taken from the instructor’s course book material, exercises, and activities.

List of Recommended References:

1. G. Bell. Engineering Geology (2nd Edition). Elsevier, 2007.

2. H. de Freitas. Engineering Geology—Principles and Practice. Springer, 2009.

3. Waltham. Foundations of Engineering Geology (2nd Edition). Spon Press, 2002.

4. Peng, J. Zhang. Engineering Geology for Underground Rocks. Springer, 2007.


Engineering Economics


Course Code: 080079 College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2.0 Instructor: Wang Xiugui (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Engineering economics is a subset of economics for application to engineering projects. Engineers seek solutions to problems, and the economic viability of each potential solution is normally considered along with the technical aspects.

2. Major teaching content:

Engineering economics is a required course for engineering undergraduates. The contents includes: 1) Introduction to Engineering Economics; 2) Time Value of Money; 3) Present-Worth Comparisons; 4) Equivalent Annual-Worth Comparisons; 5) Rate-of-Return Calculations; 6) Structural Analysis of Alternatives; 7) Replacement Analysis; 10) Effects of Inflation; 11) Sensitivity Analysis; 12) Break-even Analysis; 13) Risk Analysis.

Course Evaluation:

Test.

Textbook:

R. Panneerselvam. Engineering Economics. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India, 2008.

List of Recommended References:

Wang Xiugui. Engineering Economics. China Water Power Press, 2008.12.


Engineering Hydrology


Course Code: College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 3 Instructor: Xiong Lihua (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Principles of the hydrological cycle and processes; Analysis methods of components of the hydrological cycle; Engineering design procedures for hydrologic system; Reservoir operation and water resources management.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Hydrologic principles: Hydrological cycle; Hydrological processes; Atmospheric water; Surface water; Subsurface water; Ground water; Hydrological measurement; 2) Hydrologic analysis: Hydrograph analysis; Runoff generation mechanism; Unit hydrograph theory; The Nash model; Flood routing; Watershed hydrological model; Frequency analysis; 3) Water resources development: Design storms; Reservoir operation; Erosion and reservoir sediment; Water resources protection; 4) Geographic information systems and remote sensing in hydrology: Geographic information systems in hydrology; Remote sensing in hydrology.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Lectures are given in classes. Assignments are provided for helping students to better understand the course.

^ Course Evaluation:

The evaluation comprises of a final exam worth 60% and homework worth 30% and class participation worth 10%. The final exam is 2 hours duration.

Textbook:

Bedient, P. B., W. C. Huber, B. Vieux. Hydrology and Floodplain Analysis (4th Edition). Prentice Hall, NJ, 2008.

List of Recommended References:

1. Ven Te Chow, David R. Maidment, Larry W. Mays. Applied Hydrology. McGraw-Hill Book Company. 1988.

2. Andy D. Ward, Villiam J. Elliot. Environmental Hydrology. Lewis Publisher, 1995.

3. Daniel P. Loucks, Eelco van Beek. Water Resources Systems Planning and Management. UNESCO publishing, 2005.

4. Elizabeth M. Shaw. Hydrology in Practice (3rd Edition). Spon Press, 1998.

5. K Subramanya. Engineering Hydrology (3rd Edition). The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2008.

6. K. C. Patra. Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering (2nd Edition). Alpha Science International LID, 2008.

7. KN Mutreja. Applied Hydrology. India: Urvshi Press, 1986.

8. Lynn E. Johnson. Geographic Information Systems in Water Resources Engineering. CRC Press, 2009.

9. Mark J. Hammer, Kenneth A. Mac Kichan. Hydrology and Quality of Water Resources. John Wiley & Sons, 1981.

10. Ray K. Linsley, Max A.Kohler, Joseph L. H. Paulhus. Hydrology for Engineers. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1982.

11. Wilfried Brutsaert. Hydrology: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press, 2005.


Irrigation and Drainage


Course Code: 0800348 College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Juniors in Irrigation and Drainage Engineering/Water Resources Engineering

^ Credits: 3 Instructor: Huang Jiesheng (China)

Course Content:

Soil and water, crop water requirement, irrigation water demands, irrigation scheduling, irrigation methods, surface irrigation system, sprinkler and microirrigation systems, land forming for irrigation and drainage, needs for drainage, surface drainage and subsurface drainage, drainage system, irrigation water sources and intakes, management of irrigation system.

^ Course Evaluation:

Attendance, assignment and final examination.

Textbook:

Irrigation and Drainage (edited by instructors).

List of Recommended References:

Glenn J.Hoffman et al. Design and Operation of Farm Irrigation Systems (2nd Edition). The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2007.


^ River Dynamics


Course Code: 0800 College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Harbor, Coastal and River Engineering

Credits: 5 Instructor: Cao Zhixian (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course is one of the specialized basic courses of department of Harbor, Coastal and River Engineering. Through this study, students will obtain the knowledge of sediment movement and fluvial process of rivers; master the fundamental laws of sediment movement; understand the basic theories of fluvial process of rivers and the specific rules in different river patterns. Through the teaching steps, students will achieve capabilities of research, design or management, etc., involving sediment movement, fluvial process of rivers and related subjects.

2. Major teaching content:

The main teaching contents are of three parts: fundamental laws of sediment movement, theories of river bed evolution and sediment problems in engineering.

The first part contains eight chapters, namely, characteristics of sediment; sediment settling velocity; incipient motion of sediment; sand waves and movable bed resistance; sediment transport rate of bed load; governing equations of suspended sediment and its vertical distribution; sediment-carrying capacity of suspended sediment; and density current.

The second part contains seven chapters, namely, general problems of fluvial process of rivers; fluvial process of straight river; fluvial process of meandering river; fluvial process of braided river; fluvial process of wandering river; shoal evolution; evolution in tidal estuaries.

The third part involves three chapters, namely, reservoir sediment; scouring in downstream of dam; sediment problems near water intake.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

The main teaching method is classroom lectures and discussion, school assignment, experiments (six in total), etc.

Course Evaluation:

Examination.

Textbook:

Chen Li, Ming Zhongfu. River Dynamics. Wuhan University Press, 2001.

List of Recommended References:

1. Zhang Xiaofeng, et al. River Dynamics. Beijing: China Water Power Press, 2010.

2. Xie Jianheng. Fluvial Process and Regulation (2nd Edition). Beijing: China Water Power Press, 1997.

3. Xia Zhenhuan, Zhang Hao, et al. Reservoir Sediment. Beijing: China Water Power Press, 1979.

4. Zhang Ruijing, Xie Jianheng, Wang Mingfu, et al. Dynamics of River Sediment. Beijing: China Water Power Press, 1989.

5. Zhang Ruijing. River Dynamics. China Industry Press, 1965.

6. Chen Yongkuan. Vertical Distribution of Suspended Sediment. Journal of Sediment Research, 1984, (1).

7. Xie Jianheng. River Sediment Engineering. Beijing: China Water Power Press, 1980.


River Simulation


Course Code:0800332 College: College of Water Resources and Hydroelectric Engineering

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Harbor, Coastal and River Engineering

Credits: 5 Instructor: Xia Junqiang (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course is one of the specialized courses of department of Harbor, Coastal and River Engineering. Through this study, students will obtain knowledge of the basic rules and methods about river simulation and master the preliminary ability to settle the engineering problems using simulation techniques.

2. Major teaching content:

The main teaching contents are of two parts: theories and methods of numerical simulation; theories and methods of physical model test of river engineering.

The first part contains four chapters, namely, governing equations of flow and sediment for numerical simulation; one-dimensional steady flow numerical model; one-dimensional unsteady flow numerical model; and horizontal two-dimensional flow and sediment numerical model.

The second part contains four chapters, namely, the theories and methods of similarity; theories and methods of physical model test under fixed bed; theories and methods of physical model test under movable bed; equipment and operation of physical model test.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Classroom lectures and discussion, school assignment, etc. Two practice teaching sections, namely, course design of river simulation and practice of physical model test, are arranged to match this course.




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