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List of Recommended References:

1. Pan Chendong, Pan Chenbiao. ^ Simple Elementary Mathematics. Peking University Press, 1998

2. Pan Chendong, Pan Chenbiao. Elementary Mathematics. Peking University Press, 1992.

3. Hua Luogen. Guide of Mathematics. Science Press, 1979.

4. Min Sihe. Method of Mathematics. Science Press, 1981.

5. Min Sihe, Yan Shijian. Elementary Mathematics (2nd Edition). Advanced Education Press, 1982.

6. Chen Gongliang. Mathematics Foundation of Information Security. Tsinghua University Press, 2008.

7. Qin Zhongping, Zhang HUanguo. Mathematics Foundation of Information Security. Tsinghua University Press, 2006.


Compiler Principles and Techniques


Course Code: 0800022 College: International School of Software

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Sophomores

Credits: 3 Instructor: Li Li (China)

Course content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The course is one of the most important basic courses for the students in computer major. At the end of the course the student will be able to design and implement a simple compiler: 1) To know the architecture of a compiler and be able to apply the principles and concepts used in compiler construction; 2) To know how to build a compiler for a (simplified) (programming) language; 3) Be able to write LL, LR grammars for new languages; 4) Be familiar with compiler analysis and optimization techniques; 5) To know how to use compiler construction tools, such as generator for scanners and parsers.

2. Major teaching content:

This course provides an introduction to compiler technology and development and research direction of compiler technology. The students will learn how a compiler is built and what techniques a compiler is founded on. It will cover each component of a compiler including lexical analysis, parsing, code generation, code optimization and type checking. The course assumes that the students are already rather good programmers. As part of the course, students will implement a working compiler for a simple high level programming language.

^ Course Evaluation:

Coursework and quiz 30%, practical exercises 20% and final exam 50%.

Textbook:

Alfred Aho, Ravi Sethi, Jeffrey D Ullman. Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools (2nd Edition). Pearson Education Asia, 2008.

List of Recommended References:

1. Zhang Suqin, Lv Yingzhi et al. Compiler Principles (2nd Edition). Tsinghua Unversity Press, 2005. 2.

2. Kenneth C. Louden. Compiler Construction: Principles and Practice. Thompson Learning, 2003.

3. C. N. Fischer and R. J. LeBlanc. Crafting a Compiler with C. Benjamin Cummings, 2003.

4. Wu Chunxiang. Compiler Principle, Exercises and Resolution. Tsinghua University Press, 2003.

5. Allen I. Holub. Compiler Design in C. Prentice Hall of India, 2003.

6. J. P. Bennet. Introduction to Compiler Techniques (2nd Edition). Tata McGraw-Hill, 2003.


Introduction to Computer Systems


Course Code: 0800028 College: International School of Software

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Freshmen of Software Engineering

Credits: 1.5 Instructor: Zhang Yun (China)

Course Content:

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of using and maintaining computer systems in an Internet environment. The basic components and functions of the computer and the network are introduced, along with tools and procedures for their operation and maintenance. The essential topics may include: basic machine architecture (processors, memory, I/O); basic operating system concepts (processes, concurrency, address spaces); I/O devices for storage and multimedia; basics of processing, storage and communication capacity; command processors and scripting; file systems; basic network architecture; installing new software and devices; backups, compression, security, encryption.

Knowledgeably discuss: 1) Computer hardware (processors, memory, buses), concepts for measuring computation (bits, bytes, megahertz, instructions per second [IPS], storage capacity), and peripheral devices (video cards, keyboards, mouse devices, printers); 2) Operating system architecture and device management (virtual memory, multitasking); 3) Software development and engineering; 4)Applications software, including user interfaces, database systems, and Internet applications; 5) Network architecture, such as local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), network topologies, Ethernet cards, modems, network protocols, name resolution, and client/server architectures; 6) The Internet, including services and trends; 7) Maintenance of system integrity, including disk backups, security, and power.

^ Course Evaluation:

Assignments (30%) +practical quiz (10%)+written final exam (60%).

Textbook:

Parsons J. J. New Perspectives on Computer Concepts (10th Edition), 2008.

List of Recommended References:

http://seqcc.icarnegie.com online course notes.


Object-oriented Programming and Design


Course Code: 0800495 College: International School of Software

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Sophomores

Credits: 2.5 Instructor: Gui Hao (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course introduces students to professional tools and processes for designing, documenting, and programming software systems. Students learn effective software architecture and problem solving techniques by means of object-oriented programming and design. There is an emphasis on problem analysis and solution design, documentation and coding conventions (using formats widely applied in the workplace), and implementation. Students use commercial software libraries and create robust software applications, such as a point-of-sale cash register kiosk. Starting with a specification, students design UML class diagrams, use design patterns, implement in Java, and test their solutions. This course gives students the experience and knowledge to create highly functional, well designed software systems.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to: 1) Program using object-oriented techniques; 2) Design robust, extensible classes; 3) Express design using UML; 4) Write programs by writing cooperating classes and interfaces; 5) Understand the process for developing software projects.

Students successfully completing SSD3 will be able to: a. Produce: 1) Java programs exhibiting object-oriented programming features including inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes, and interfaces; 2) Robust Java classes through the use of exceptions and access modifiers; 3) Object-oriented designs using UML; 4) Java implementation from a specification; 5) Extensions to existing Java programs to improve performance or to add functionality; 6) Professional quality code using code conventions followed in the industry; b. Use: 1) Commonly used professional tools such as debuggers, Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), and UML editors; 2) Utility classes and packages involving I/O, and tokenization; 3) Java Swing classes to implement GUIs; 4) On-line resources for keeping up to date on Java developments; 5) Design patterns; 6) Test cases for unit testing; 7) Collections and iterators; c. Knowledgeably discuss: Advanced object-oriented concepts.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Modularity and abstraction; 2) Encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism; 3) Use and creation of software libraries; 4) Javadoc; 5) Unit testing; 6) UML; 7) Java programming; 8) IDEs; 9) Design patterns.

Course Evaluation:

Midterm and final exam.

Textbook:

Carniege SSD3 Textbook.

^ List of Recommended References:

1. Barker, Jacquie. Beginning Java Objects: From Concepts to Code. Apress.

2. Bruce Eckel. Thinking in Java (4th Edition).


Artificial Intelligence


Course Code: 0801131 College: International School of Software

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Juniors

Credits: 2 Instructor: Xie Rong (China); Bob McKay (Australia)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important branch of computer science, which focuses on research on how to simulate and implement humankind intelligence and intelligence behavior. Students will be introduced to the key foundational and methodological issues in Artificial Intelligence. The course will provide an overview of AI techniques and their applications in a range of domains. The theoretical discussion of techniques and algorithms will be underpinned by practical exercises, thus providing students with an appreciation of the applicability in concrete problems of the techniques described in the course.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Artificial intelligence and intelligent system, and research and applications in artificial intelligence; 2) Approaches to knowledge representation and techniques of search and reasoning, including state space, problem reduction, predicate logic, semantic network, uninformed search, heuristically search, rule-based deduction systems and production systems; 3) Advanced knowledge reasoning, including uncertainty reasoning and non-monotony reasoning; 4) Basis knowledge of computational intelligence, including neural computation, fuzzy computation, evolutionary programming and artificial life; 5) Applications and cutting-edge technology of artificial intelligence, including expert system, machine learning, automatic planning, agent, natural language understanding; 6) Debates in artificial intelligence, impacts of artificial intelligence on humankind and expectation for artificial intelligence.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

1) “1+1” full-English dual-class teaching mode; 2) Full-English teaching.

Course Evaluation:

Close-book examination+practice report.

Textbook:

Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (3rd Edition), 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Tim Jones. Artificial Intelligence: A Systems Approach (Computer Science), 2008.

2. Henry Brighton and Howard Selina. Introducing Artificial Intelligence, 2003.


Software Engineering


Course Code: 0800523 College: International School of Software

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Juniors

Credits: 2 Instructor: Fan Hao(China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course is an introduction to software engineering, including the principles and practices that contribute to producing better software and to making software development more predictable and economical. Student will learn about how software development practices have changed in the last few decades and about the different phases that a software product goes through. For each phase of software development, student will study specific techniques for improving the quality of products and will read about the interactions and expectations of groups and organizations that participate in the software development process.

2. Major teaching content:

The contents mainly include the following parts: Introduction to Software Engineering; The Software Process/Software Life-Cycle Models; Analysis and Specification; Architectural and Detailed Design; Introduction to Object-Oriented; Object-Oriented Analysis; Object-Oriented Design (OOD); Build and Test the Solution; Documenting the Solution and Maintenance.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

The teaching method is actually a combination of theory teaching, practice teaching and project practice. For each chapter of theoretical teaching, there will be theoretical assignments. In addition, the practical content of some actual projects of software engineering will be broken into various sections to theoretical teaching. As a result, students will not only learn the theory, but also be able to apply theory to practice. Near the end of the semester, some actual task of software projects will be distributed to students. These projects must be done by teams and each team should demonstrate their results for getting evaluation and some good suggestions.

Course Evaluation:

Total score=exercise (10%)+practical (30%)+classroom exam (10%)+final exam (50%).

Textbook:

online course for icarnegie SSD9.

List of Recommended References:

1. Stephen R. Schach. Object-Oriented and Classical Software Engineering (7th Edition). McGraw Hill Publishing Co., 2007.

2. Roger S. Pressman. Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach, 6/e. McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-365578-3, QA76.758.P75, 2001.


Software Architecture


Course Code: 0801461 College: International School of Software

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Han Bo (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The course introduces the basic concepts and practices of software architecture. Through the study of this course, students can understand how a software system is structured and how that system’s components are meant to interact; students can also have a deep understanding that architecture holds the key to achieving system quality attributes, and it is a reusable asset that can be applied to other systems. The course study will provide the essential foundation for students to engage in work including software architecture design in the future.

2. Major teaching content:

The course will cover the topics including: the definition of software architecture, architecture business cycle, system quality attributes, designing software architecture, documenting software architecture, architecture description language and the evaluation approaches for software architecture, etc.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

The teaching methods will involve lecture introductions and case study discussions.

^ Course Evaluation:

Homework and final exam.

Textbook:

Len Bass, Paul Clements, Rick Kazman. Software Architecture in Practice (2nd Edition). Addison Wesley, 2003.

List of Recommended References:

Clements, P., Bachmann, F., Bass, L., Garlan, D., Ivers, J., Little, R., Nord, R., Stafford, J. ^ Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond. Addison Wesley, 2003.


Fundamentals of Database Systems


Course Code: 0800025 College: International School of Software

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Sophomores

Credits: 3 Instructor: Dong Hongbin (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

After completing this course, students will be able to: 1) Use database management software to develop data-intensive applications; 2) Develop and manage medium-scale database projects; 3) Understand fundamental DBMS concepts; 4) Access and understand future trends in databases.

2. Major teaching content:

Course topics include:

1) Relational data models and data independence; 2) Relational query languages and SQL; 3) Database design; 4) Normalization; 5) Client-server applications; 6) Transactions; 7) Indexes; 8) Performance issues.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

This course trains students to build web-based software application systems with well-designed database systems, by teaching database concepts and then the practical work of database system design and implementation. It draws on previous training in advanced Java, web environments, object-oriented programming, and usability design. Students develop client-server applications in Java and JSP, using database management systems. The assignment involves the creation of an e-commerce bookstore, which must support the ability for users to register themselves, search content, place and track orders, and change personal settings. Students gain the necessary skills to create data models appropriate for specific applications (relational data models are emphasized), tune the underlying database for fast response times, and ensure the system is robust enough to handle failures.

4. Course Prerequisites:

Data Structures and Algorithms

Course Evaluation:

Attendance 10%+assignment 20%+mid-term exam 20%+final exam 50%.

Textbook:

1. Thomas M. Connolly et al. Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management (4th Edition). ISBN: 0321210255. Addison-Wesley, 2004.

2. Thomas M. Connolly, et al. Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management (3rd Edition). ISBN: 0201708574. Addison-Wesley, 2001.

List of Recommended References:

Patrick O’Neil, Elizabeth O’Neil. Database Principles, Programming, and Performance (2nd Edition). Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.

Digital Logic Circuits


Course Code: 1300049 College: International School of Software

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Sophomores

Credits: 4 Instructor: Wang Yulin (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Students will be able to analyze and do some simple design of combinational logic. They will be familiar with and incorporate into circuits the basic gates, decoders, encoders, multiplexers, demultipexers, adders and subtractors.

Students will be able to analyze and do some simple design of sequential logic. They will be familiar with and incorporate into circuits the latches, flip-flops, and counters.

Students will examine the various logic gates and circuits in the laboratory. They will design, build and troubleshoot logic circuits in the laboratory.

2. Major teaching content:

Number systems; Boolean Algebra; Simplification and Minimization of Boolean Functions; Logic Gates and Logic Circuits Implementation; Combinational Circuit Design and Analysis; Flip Flops, Registers, and Counters; Design and Analysis of Sequential Circuits; VHDL.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

28 lectures, 14 discussion sections.

Course Evaluation:

Prerequisite exam, graded homework, graded examinations, course evaluation by students, instructor judgment.

Textbook:

Victor P. Nelson. Digital Logic Circuit Analysis and Design. Prentice Hall, 2005.

List of Recommended References:

1. Peter J. Ashenden. The Student's Guide to VHDL (2nd Edition). Morgan Kaufmann, 2008.

2. Stephen Brown and Zvonko Vranesic. Fundamentals of Digital Logic with VHDL Design (3rd Edition). McGraw-Hill, 2009.

3. Digital Logic Pocket Data Book. Texas Instruments, SCYD013A, 2004.


Information Security


Course Code: 0800556 College: International School of Software

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Seniors

Credits: 3 Instructor: Shen Zhidong (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

In this course, the teacher will introduce the crypto, key management, access control, firewall, intrusion detection. The network security is an important aspect. From this course, the students will get a basic whole and systematic knowledge about information security. They will also understand the basic methods and general approaches to build and maintain the secure network and application system.

2. Major teaching content:

From this course, the students will get a whole knowledge of the information security. Introductions of the crypto, key management, access control, firewall, and intruding detection are the main content of this course. They will get fundamentals of network security. The new development of information security will be introduced to students, and, according to the new research and solution product, the special subject discussion will be held. This discussion may include the application of information security software, the information security problems about people, company and country.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Because this course includes broad content which updates quickly and has close relation with application, the course textbook may not embody the new technology of information security. In this case, in the teaching of this course, some content will be introduced from different books and network. Different teaching methods, such as class teaching, self-study after class and discussion in class, will be used in this course.

^ Course Evaluation:

Total score=exercise (20%) +quiz (20%) +final exam (60%).

Textbook:

Mark Stamp. Information Security---Principles and Practice. Publishing House of Electronics Industry, 2007.

List of Recommended References:

1. William Stalling. Cryptography and Network Security---Principle and Practice (2nd Edition). Publishing House of Electronics Industry, 2001.

2. Bruce Schneier. Applied Cryptography---Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C (2nd Edition). China Machine Press, 2000.


Introduction to Information System


Course Code: 0800029 College: International School of Software

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Freshmen

Credits: 1.5 Instructor: Wang Liwei (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This is an introductory programming course. The course uses the Java language to illustrate programming concepts. You will learn how to program a computer to do simple tasks:

1) Learn foundational Internet skills and concepts;

2) Learn foundational programming skills and concepts;

3) Prepare for future Java courses by learning simple Java syntax and structure;

4) Prepare for future programming courses by learning solid programming practices and strategies.

2. Major teaching content:

In unit 1, you will use the Web to search for information, and then you will design simple Web pages. You will also develop HTML forms that communicate with servlets. In units 2 and 3, you will write simple Java programs that can be incorporated in your Web pages. These programs can extend simple Web server functionality to create dynamic Web pages. In the process, you will learn and practice the following: compilation, syntax rules, variables, rudimentary object-oriented concepts (specifically classes, objects, and inheritance), data types, control structures, loops, and so on.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Each of the three units has several modules. Each module contains a homework exercise as well as both a multiple-choice quiz and a practical quiz, so the course includes 3 hours’ lecture, two hours’ practice, and three hours’ exercise per week. The course also contains three in-class exams.




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