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^ Course Evaluation:

Examination.

Textbook:

Sears and Zemansky. University Physics---with Modern Physics (12th Edition). Young & Freedman, Addison& Wesley.

List of Recommended References:

1. Harried. University Physics.

2. Lu Dexin. University Physics. Higher Education Press.


Classical Mechanics II


Course Code: 0700911 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 4 Instructor: Zhou Xiang (China)

Course Content:

We will study the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. We will use computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration. We will consider the following topics: Lagrangian Mechanics, Rigid Bodies, Hamiltonian Mechanics, Phase Space Structure, Canonical Transformations, and Canonical Perturbation Theory. Ideas will be illustrated and supported with physical examples. We will make extensive use of computing to capture methods, for simulation, and for symbolic analysis.

^ Course Evaluation:

Regular score (50%), final exam (50%).

Textbook:

Gerald Jay Sussman and Jack Wisdom. Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics, MIT Press, 2001.

List of Recommended References:

1. Addison Wesley, Herbert Goldstein, Charles P. Poole, John L. Safko. Classical Mechanics (3rd Edition), 2001.

2. Springer, Florian Scheck. Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos, 2010.


Introduction to Elementary Particles


Course Code: 0700708 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 3 Instructor: Zhang Zhenyu (China)

Course Content:

This is a one-semester course designed to give a well-balanced introduction to history, basic theoretical concepts, and major experimental results that emerged from the ultimate quest for understanding the most fundamental constituents of matter and the primary forces of nature.

Topics include: 1) Preliminary notions: a. Mass, energy, linear momentum; b. The law of motion of a particle; c. The mass of a system of particles, kinematic invariants; d. Systems of interacting particles; e. Natural units; f. Collisions and decays; g. Hadrons, leptons and quarks; h. Sources of high-energy particles; 2) Nucleons, leptons and bosons: a. The muon and the pion; b. Strange mesons and hyperons; c. The quantum numbers of the charged pion; d. Charged leptons and neutrinos; e. The positron and antiproton; 3) Symmetries: a. Symmetries and the conservation laws; b. Particle-antiparticle conjugation; c. Time reversal and CPT; d. The parity of the pion; e. Pion decay; f. Quark flavours and baryonic number; g. Leptonic flavours and lepton number; h. Isospin; i. G-Parity; 4) Hadrons: a. Resonances; b. The baryons; c. The Dalitz plot; d. Spin, parity, isospin analysis of three-pion systems; e. Pseudoscalar and vector mesons; f. The quark model; g. Mesons; h. Baryons; i. Charm; j. The third family; k. The elements of the Standard Model; 5) Elementary particle dynamics: a. The four forces; b. Quantum electrodynamics (QED); c. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD); d. Weak interactions; e. Unification schemes.

Course Evaluation:

Regular score (50%), final exam (50%).

Textbook:

1. Alessandro Bettini. Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

2. Wiley-Vch, David Griffiths. Introduction to Elementary Particles (2nd Revised Edition), 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Donald H. Perkins. Introduction to High Energy Physics (4th Edition). Cambridge, 2000.

2. B. R. Martin. Nuclear and Particle Physics: An Introduction. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2006.


Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics


Course Code: 0700573 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Electronic Science and Technology

Credits: 3 Instructor: Liu Huijun (China)

Course Content:

The objective of Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics is to study the laws of thermal motions and their influences on the macroscopic properties of matters. We will mainly focus on the following 11 chapters:

1) Chapter 1: Temperature and equation of state; 2) Chapter 2: The first law of thermodynamics; 3) Chapter 3: The second law of thermodynamics; 4) Chapter 4: Thermodynamic functions; 5) Chapter 5: Low temperature and the third law of thermodynamics: 6) Chapter 6: General criteria for equilibrium and stable equilibrium; 7) Chapter 7: Phase equilibrium and transitions; 8) Chapter 8: Fundamental principle of statistical physics; 9) Chapter 9: Equilibrium statistical theory; 10) Chapter 10: Applications of equilibrium statistical theory; 11) Chapter 11: Fluctuations.

During the class, we will use both the multimedia and the blackboard. In addition to the classroom lectures, there will be also tutorials and homework.

Course Evaluation:

Homework (10%), 1st exam (40%), 2nd exam (50%).

Textbook:

Hu Chengzheng. Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics. Science Press, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. R. Kubo. Thermodynamics: An Advanced Course with Problems and Solutions. Amsterdam: North-Holland, 1968.

2. R. Kubo. Statistical Mechanics: An Advanced Course with Problems and Solutions. Amsterdam: North-Holland, 1965.

3. L.D. Landau and E.M. Lifshitz. Statistical Physics. Butterworth Heinemann, 1999.


Mathematical Physics


Course Code: 0700910 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 4 Instructor: Cai Hao (China)

Course Content:

There are several distinct branches of mathematical physics, and these roughly correspond to particular historical periods. The theory of partial differential equations (and the related areas of variational calculus, Fourier analysis, potential theory, and vector analysis) are perhaps most closely associated with mathematical physics. These were developed intensively from the second half of the eighteenth century (by, for example, D'Alembert, Euler, and Lagrange) until the 1930s. Physical applications of these developments include hydrodynamics, celestial mechanics, elasticity theory, acoustics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and aerodynamics. The theory of atomic spectra (and, later, quantum mechanics) developed almost concurrently with the mathematical fields of linear algebra, the spectral theory of operators, and more broadly, functional analysis. These constitute the mathematical basis of another branch of mathematical physics. The special and general theories of relativity require a rather different type of mathematics. This was group theory: and it played an important role in both quantum field theory and differential geometry. This was, however, gradually supplemented by topology in the mathematical description of cosmological as well as quantum field theory phenomena. Statistical mechanics forms a separate field, which is closely related with the more mathematical ergodic theory and some parts of probability theory. There are increasing interactions between combinatorics and physics, in particular statistical physics.

This course should not involve every aspect of mathematical physics, while it should pay attention to the theory of partial differential equations and the spectral theory of operators, especially to the Green’s function method. The training target serves the practical application of mathematics to problems in physics.

Course Evaluation:

Regular record (50%), final exam (50%).

Textbook:

Eugene Butkov. Mathematical Physics. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1968.

List of Recommended References:

1. Edgar A. Kraut. Fundamentals of Mathematical Physics. Dover Publications, 2007.

2. Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Michael T. Vaughn. Introduction to Mathematical Physics.


Statistical Physics I


Course Code: 0700906 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 2 Instructor: Zhou Xiang (China)

Course Content:

We will study the large-scale (i.e. macroscopic) systems consisting of many atoms or molecules. It provides an introduction to the subjects of statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, and heat. We will make use of computing for simulation.

^ Course Evaluation:

Regular score (50%), final exam (50%).

Textbook:

F. Reif. Statistical Physics: Berkeley Physics Course (Vol. 5). McGraw-Hill Inc., 1965.

List of Recommended References:

1. Harvey Gould and Jan Tobochnik. Statistical and Thermal Physics: With Computer Applications. Princeton University Press, 2010.

2. William C. Robertson and Brian Diskin. Energy (Stop Faking It! Finally Understanding Science so You Can Teach It). National Science Teachers Association, 2002.

3. Charles Kittel and Herbert Kroemer. Thermal Physics (2nd Edition). W. H. Freeman and Company, 1980.


Atomic Physics and Nuclear Physics


Course Code: 0700260 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Sophomores in the Base Class of Physics

Credits: 3 Instructor: Shi Ying (China)

Course Content:

Atomic Physics and Nuclear Physics, which developed with the progress of quantum mechanics, is a base discipline concerned about the basic rules in the microscopic world of atoms and nuclei. This course, which is based on the introduction of the fundamental theories in quantum mechanics, starts from experimental facts and centers on the announcement of atomic structure. Besides the interpretations of the atomic and nuclear structure and characteristics, the developing history of the relevant discipline and the actual application achievements are also presented to arise the learning interests of the students, which is helpful for the students to establish physics ideas and solve practical problems. First given in February 2003, the whole teaching sectors of this course are gradually done in pure English. The English multimedia teaching PowerPoint files are self-created. All the content of the course is taught in English. In the same time, the exercises and examination questions databases in English are established. The students must answer questions, do homework and take examinations in English. By means of this monolingual teaching, the students will learn the physical knowledge about atom and nucleus, get familiar with scientific English grammar and specialized English vocabulary, promote the ability in English reading and comprehension, know in time the most recent progress in international scientific research, enhance the learning and understanding capacity about basic and newest knowledge, lay a solid foundation for physical subject references reading in the future learning and study.

^ Course Evaluation:

Ordinary homework, mid-term examination and final examination.

Textbook:

Fu-Jia Yang. Atomic Physics. (4th Edition). Higher Education Press, 2008.

List of Recommended References:

1. Atomic Physics and Nuclear Physics. (self-edited printed teaching materials, modified every year)

2. B.H.Bransden and C.J.Joachain. Physics of Atoms and Molecules (2nd Edition). Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2003.

3. H.Haken and H.C.Wolf. The Physics of Atoms and Quanta (6th Edition). Springer-Verlag, 2000.

4. T.A.Littlefield and N.Thorley. Atomic and Nuclear Physics (3rd Edition). Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. Ltd., 1979.

5. M. R. Wehr, J. A. Richards and T. W. Adair. Physics of the Atom (3rd Edition). Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1978.

6. J. C. Willmott. Atomic Physics. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 1975.

7. H.Frauenfelder and E.M.Henley. Subatomic Physics. Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1974.


0402 Biological Sciences

Zoology


Course Code: 0700154 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 3 Instructor: Lu Xin (China)

Course Content:

Through expatiating the structure and function of animal organisms at different levels (molecule, cell, tissue, organ, system, individual and population), the major objective of this course is to promote our understanding of ourselves and the millions of other organisms with which we share our planet. Evolutionary concepts which illustrate the change of a population over time as a response to environmental pressures are presented clearly and convincingly all through the course, especially in an ecological perspective. The problems of “Wildlife Alerts” are also addressed to raise our attention to biodiversity conservation. The unification of structure and function, and that of animal organisms and environments, are emphasized as the general principles in zoological science.

^ Methods of Evaluation:

Normal assessment: homework, quizzes, and class activities; final exam: written examination; final grade: normal assessment 30-40%, final exam 60%-70%.

Textbook:

Miller S. A. and Harley J. P. Zoology (7th Edition). McGraw Hill Higher Education, 2007.

List of Recommended References:

1. Liu L. Y. and Zheng G. M. General Zoology (3rd Edition). Beijing: Higher Education Press, 1997.

2. Xu C. R. and Cheng H. Animal Biology (2nd Edition). Beijing: Higher Education Press, 2000.


Molecular Biology


Course Code: 0700163 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Sophmores in International Class

Credits: 3 Instructor: Liu Qingzhen (China)

Course Content:

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the maintenance of the genome, the expression of the genome and the regulation of gene expression. These will be followed by the introduction of the techniques of molecular biology and model organisms. The course format is lecture presented with slides.

Teaching assistants are junior students in College of Life Sciences. They will organize group study in which they answer questions from students and help students understand the content in the textbook.

The course web page can be found on: http://202.114.65.51/fzjx/fzswx/. Posted on the webpage are the courseware and the quizzes and exams in the past few years.

Course Evaluation:

Quiz 15%, courseware 5% (each student should choose one chapter to make a courseware), group study 5%, final exam 70%, bonus 1-3%.

Textbook:

Jame Watson etc. Molecular Biology of the Gene (6th Edition). Cold Spring Harbor Press, 2007.

List of Recommended References:

1. Turner etc. Instant Notes in Molecular Biology (2nd Edition). Bioscientific Press, UK, 2000.

2. Robert Weaver. Molecular Biology (3rd Edition). McGraw-Hill Companies Inc., 2005.


Immunology


Course Code: 0700178 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Juniors

Credits: 3 Instructor: Wang Yanyi (China)

Course Content:

1. Course objectives:

This introductory course aims to give a general introduction to the human immune system and immune-based diseases.

2. Major course content:

This course presents the basic principles and mechanisms of immunology. Topics such as components of the immune system, innate immunity, antigen recognition by lymphocyte antigen receptors, generation of lymphocyte antigen receptors, MHC molecules, development of lymphocytes, T cell mediated immunity, humoral immunity, hypersensitivity, tolerance and autoimmunity will be covered. Moreover, this course also briefly introduces the basic and advanced techniques used in immune research.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Primarily through classroom lectures. Efforts are made to promote classroom discussions in order to attract the students’ interest. At the beginning of each class, a “question and answer” session is arranged to check the students’ understanding of the previous lecture. Four discussion classes are set for student presentations of their favorite immune molecules.

^ Course Evaluation:

Close-book exams and presentations.

Textbook:

Thomas J. Kindt, Richard A. Goldsby, Barbara A. Osborne. Kuby Immunology (6th Edition). W. H. Freeman and company.

List of Recommended References:

Charles A. Janeway, Jr. ^ Janeway Immunobiology (8th Edition). Garland Science, 2007.


Neuroscience


Course Code: 0700629 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Seniors

Credits: 2 Instructor: Li Xiaodong (China)

Course Content:

This class is intended to teach students the basic structures and functions of nervous system and the underlying mechanism, and to introduce current research progresses. Multimedia is used to teach the materials from the textbook with off-class assignments of paper readings. The students are also given opportunities for in-class oral presentations and discussions.

^ Course Evaluation:

Three regular tests, one final test.

Textbook:

Alan Longstaff. Instant Notes in Neuroscience (2nd Edition).


Anatomy and Physiology


Course Code: 0700165 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Juniors

Credits: 3 Instructor: Li Xiaodong (China)

Course Content:

This class is intended to teach students the basic structures and functions of all human body functional systems and the mechanism in related diseases. Multimedia is used to teach the materials from the textbook with addition of disease-related topics. The students are also given opportunities for self-education and in-class oral presentation.

^ Course Evaluation:

Three regular tests, one final test.

Textbook:

Sylvia S. Mader. Understanding Human Anatomy and Physiology (4th Edition).


Biochemistry


Course Code: 0700156 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Sophomores in International Class

Credits: 5 Instructor: Guo Lin (US)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Biochemistry is a fundamental and essential course for all biology-major undergraduate students. This course has the following teaching objectives: 1) systematically teach basic knowledge in biochemistry; 2) improve Chinese students’ English vocabularies in biology; 3) cultivate students’ interest for biochemistry through connecting biochemistry basic knowledge with real life perceptive and cutting-edge research. This will be accomplished through in-class discussion sessions and guest lectures.

2. Major teaching content:

1) The Facts of Life: Chemistry Is the Logic of Biological Phenomena; 2) Water: The Medium of Life; 3) Thermodynamics of Biological Systems; 4) Amino Acids; 5) Proteins: Their Primary Structure and Biological Functions; 6) Proteins: Secondary, Tertiary, and Quaternary Structure; 7) Carbohydrates and Glycoconjugates of Cell Surfaces; 8) Lipids; 9) Membranes and Membrane Transport; 10) Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids; 11) Structure of Nucleic Acids; 12) Recombinant DNA: Cloning and Creation of Chimeric Genes; 13) Enzymes-Kinetics and Specificity; 14) Mechanisms of Enzyme Action; 15) Enzyme Regulation; 16) Molecular Motors; 17) Metabolism: An Overview; 18) Glycolysis; 19) The Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle; 20) Electron Transport and Oxidative Phosphorylation; 21) Photosynthesis; 22) Gluconeogenesis, Glycogen Metabolism, and the Pentose Phosphate Pathway; 23) Fatty Acid Catabolism; 24) Lipid Biosynthesis; 25) Nitrogen Acquisition and Amino Acid Metabolism; 26) The synthesis and Degradation of Nucleotides; 27) Metabolic Integration and Organ Specialization; 28) DNA Metabolism: Replication, Recombination, and Repair; 29) Transcription and the Regulation of Gene Expression; 30) Protein Synthesis; 31) Completing the Protein Life Cycle: Folding, Processing and Degradation; 32) The Reception and Transmission of Extracellular Information.

^ Course Evaluation:

Homework 10%, presentation 10%, midterm test 20%, final exam 60%.

Textbook:

Reginald H. Garrett and Charles M. Grisham. Biochemistry (4th Edition). BROOKS/COLE CENGAGE Learning, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Trudy Mckee and James R.Mckee. Biochemistry: The Molecular Basis of Life (4th Edition). Oxford Press, 2009.

2. Jeremy M. Berg, John L.Tymoczko and Lubert Stryer. Biochemistry (6th Edition). W.H.Freeman and Company, 2007.


Microbiology


Course Code: 0700157 College: College of Life Sciences

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduate Students in International Class

Credits: 3 Instructor: Tang Xiaofeng (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Microbiology is the required course for the undergraduate students who are preparing the careers in life sciences, medicine and pharmacy. Students learn the basic knowledge and theories of microbiology, the application of microbiology in industry, agriculture and medicine in this course. The advances in microbiology, current exciting areas and topics in microbiology are also introduced in this course. Students will master the basic characteristics of microorganisms and the nature of microbial world as well as the corresponding English expression as the basic for their future study and work.

2. Major teaching content:

The contents of this course include the microbial structure, microscopy, microbial nutrition, growth and control, metabolism, genetics, taxonomy and phylogeny, ecology, pathogenicity of microorganisms and immunology.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

The course is taught mainly in class lecture. In order to perk students’ interest in Microbiology, We usually invite a microbiologist to give a special lecture in the middle of the semester. Students are asked to give an English presentation to introduce a microbiological subject as part of their homework. Internet is used to help students to master the material they learned in class. The online source provides helpful study materials that include: self-quizzes, animations, course slides, discussion area, etc.




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