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An Introduction to American Law


^ Course Code: College: School of Law

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Juniors

Credits: 3 Instructor: Luo Guoqiang (China)

Course Content:

This Course is intended to show a brief structure of American Law to the students, and improve their ability on legal English and Foreign related legal practices.

This course will cover the following contents: Basic Structure of US Law, US Constitution, US Civil Procedural Law, US Contract Law, US Property Law, US Tort Law.

This course will use a full English Multi-media PPT and other courseware, and apply various teaching methods as moot court, case analysis and discussion, question and answer, report and comment. This course will encourage the students to take an active part in the interactions and give them useful results.

Course Evaluation:

An open-book examination.

Textbook:

Dong Shizhong, Zhao Jian eds. Legal English (2nd Edition). Fudan Press, 2006.

List of Recommended References:

1. Torbert, Luo Guoqiang. Legal English. Fudan University Press, 2008.

2. Luo Guoqiang. Training of Foreign Related Legal Practical. Wuhan University Press, 2009.


Philosophy of Law in the West


Course Code: College: School of Law

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 3 Instructor: Zhang Wanhong (Chinese)

Course Content:

1. Teaching Objectives:

This course should appeal to those willing to consider the intellectual, political, and ethical challenges offered by a philosophical approach to law. The course focuses on international, constitutional, and criminal law within broader philosophical analyses of freedom, equality, and responsibility. Lively cases and heated debates will challenge preconceptions, and philosophical readings will sharpen critical faculties. Philosophical writings from classical and contemporary theorists will be interspersed with legal materials throughout the course.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Introduction; 2) Philosophy and Law; 3) Natural Law; 4) Positivism; 5) Legal Reasoning: Formalism v. Realism; 6) Law and Ethics; 7) Constitutionalism; 8) Constitutional Interpretation; 9) Locke and Liberalism; 10) Freedom; 11) Free Speech; 12) Rights and Obligations; 13) Right to Die (Class Debates); 14) Aristotle and Equality; 15) Discrimination and Affirmative Action; 16) Punishment and Death Penalty; 17) Examination.

^ Course Evaluation:

Paper 30%, debate and discussions 20%, final examination 50%.

Textbook:

N/A.

List of Recommended References:

N/A.


Introduction to Chinese Law and Society


Course Code: College: School of Law

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 3 Instructor: Zhang Wanhong (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching Objectives:

The course of Introduction to Chinese Law and Society is aimed at giving students a panoramic perspective of Chinese legal system and society within 15 or so independent lectures. Those lectures will be delivered by several different law professors and practitioners. The topics cover various important aspects of Chinese law and society. Among others, these are legal education, public interest law movement, rural justice, and legal reform. Some controversial issues, such as human rights, will also be discussed frankly in the classroom. The change of schedule will be given both by email and the course website. Required readings will also be posted on the course website.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Lecture 1: Current Chinese Society: One Country with Four Legal Systems by Prof. Zeng Lingliang; 2) Lecture 2: A General Perspective of Rule of Law in China by ^ Prof. Zeng Lingliang; 3) Lecture 3: The Chinese Practice of International Rule of Law in the Past 30 Years by Prof. Zeng Lingliang; 4) Lecture 4: Introduction to Chinese Legal System by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 5) Lecture 5: China’s Legal Education by Prof. Huang Jin; 6) Lecture 6: Human Rights in China by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 7) Lecture 7: Public Interest Law Movement by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 8) Lecture 8: Rural Justice in China (Movie Showing: The Story of Qiu Ju) by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 9) Lecture 9: Environmental Protection in China: The Role of Law in Tackling Environmental Problems by Ms. Zhou Yanfang; 10) Lecture 10: Rural Justice in China by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 11) Lecture 11: China’s Labor Rights in the Context of Globalization by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 12) Lecture 12: China’s Road toward Rule of Law and Modernization by Prof. Zhang Wanhong; 13) Lecture 13: China’s Courts and Legal Reform in China by Justice Wan E-xiang; 14) Lecture 14: Foreign- related Cases in China’s Courts by Justice Wan E-xiang.

^ Course Evaluation:

Grades will be assessed according to performance in two general aspects: attendance and class participation (30% of the overall grade) and your competence in both a midterm paper and a final examination (20% and 50% of the overall grade respectively).

Textbook:

N/A.

List of Recommended References:

N/A.


^ 0202 Sociological Sciences

Classic Readings in Sociology


Course Code: College: Sociology Department

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Sophomore Students

Credits: 3 Instructor: Zhou Changcheng (China)


Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course uses Classic Readings in Sociology and Sociological Footprints: Introductory Readings in Sociology as textbooks, guiding the sophomore students to read originals, making them do presentation and discussion, finally getting them to know well about the history of sociological theory development, about the classic research themes in sociology and its classic references.

2. Major teaching content:

Preface; Theory; Theory & Method; Culture; Socialization & Social Interaction; Stratification & Race and Ethnicity; Gender, Family & Deviance and Socialization; Education; Urbanization & Economics; Medics & Religion.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

The course requires students to read the textbooks and the reference books independently, then discuss in group, report in groups in public, share with other classmates and the teacher what’s their enlightments from the readings. Other students standing outside the presentation group contemporarily are also obliged to participate in the discussion. At the end of the term, each student is required to turn in a reading report and the research idea report that arise during the course.

Course Evaluation:

Individual reading report 40%, individual research idea report 20%, group presentation 30%, attendance and participation 10%.

Textbook:

1. Howard, Eve L. Classic Readings in Sociology (4th Edition). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2007.

2. Gargan, L. Sociological Footprints: Introductory Readings in Sociology. Peking: Peking University Press, 2005.

List of Recommended References:

1. Giddens, Anthony, Mitchell Dunerier & Rchard Appelbaum ed. Introduction to Sociology. NY: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

2. Stephen, H. Aby. Sociology: A Guide to Reference and Information Sources (3rd Edition). Littleton, CO, Libraries Unlimited Inc, 2005.

3. Gargan, L. & J. H. Ballantine ed. Social Problems: Readings with Four Questions. Peking: Peking University Press, 2005.

4. Rizer, George. Classical Sociological Theory (4th Edition). Peking: Peking University Press, 2005.

5. Rizer, George. Modern Sociological Theory. Peking: Peking University Press, 2004.

6. Rizer, George. Contemporary Sociological Theory and its Classical Roots: the Basics. Peking: Peking University Press, 2005.

7. Wysocki, D. K. Readings in Social Research Methods. Peking: Peking University Press, 2004.


Data Analysis and Using of Statistical Software


Course Code: 08001244 College: Department of Sociology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduate students

Credits: 3 Instructor: Luo Jiaojiang (China); Yin Yanmin (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Data Analysis and Statistic Software is a required course for seniors in sociology. The objectives of this course are: 1) helping the students to combine and integrate the sociology theories, methods and statistical knowledge which they have learned in past studies; 2) helping them to analyze the data collected from a certain survey in single variable, double-variable and multi-variable perspectives respectively; 3) helping them to write nominal quantitative paper and enhance their researching ability.

2. Major teaching content:

This course is composed of three sections and twenty-two chapters or lectures. The first section: descriptive statistics; Second: inferential statistics and elucidations; Third: the application of inferential statistics.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

This course will use the world-widely popular teaching methods:

1) Teach sociological theories and principles mainly through PPT and sometimes, if necessary, black-board; 2) Show the mechanisms of formation of statistical formulas through soft-wares; 3) exemplify how to analyze data, apply statistical principle, explain the results, and solve daily problems with the help of soft-wares.; 4) Give the students opportunities to practice on computers; 5) Organize class discussion and answer questions about theories and practices.

Teaching approaches used in this course:

1) PPT. Teachers will make systematic detailed teaching PPT materials; 2) Statistical soft-wares. Mainly use Stata and SPSS, which are popular all over the world; 3) Computers. Practice on computers right after theoretical teaching.

^ Course Evaluation:

The final score of the students will be based on class performance and sociological quantitative term paper.

Textbook:

1. Arthur M. Glenberg. Learning from Data: An Introduction to Statistical Reasoning (2nd Edition). Lawrence Erlbaum Associate Publishers.

2. William Fox. Social Statistics: A Text Using Microcase. Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press.

List of Recommended References:

1. Peter M.Nardi. Interpreting Data: A Guide to Understanding Research. Pearson Edication, Inc.

2. David W.Britt. A Conceptual Introduction to Modeling: Qualitative and Quantitative Perspectives. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

3. Sophia Rabe-Hesketh Brian Everitt. A Handbook of Statistical analyses Using Stata (3rd Edition). ACRC Press Company.

4. Neil J.Salkind. Statistics for Them Who Hates Statistics (2nd Edition). Sage Publications, Inc.

5. Herman J. Loether, Donald G. McTavish. Descriptive and Inferential Statistics: An Introduction (3rd Edition). Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

6. Lloyd R. Jaisingh. Statistics for the Utterly Confused. McGraw-Hill Companies.


03 Field of Knowledge: Literature


0301 Chinese Language and Literature

Introduction to Western Masterpieces


Course Code: College: School of Chinese Language and Literature

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Zhang Jianfei (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching Content:

This course attempts to draw students’ attention to an rising interdisciplinary urban studies by focusing on representation of city in those great western novels, mainly including Invisible Cities, Pere Goriot, Bleak House and Sister Carrie, in which Venice, Paris, London, Chicago and New York can be read as more than backgrounds or settings for fictional plots. Thus, Students are expected to read selected chapters more than literarily in order to achieve some fundamental understanding of what is city, what shapes it, how cities influence their inhabitants’ fate or ethos… with the help of wider disciplines such as history, architecture, film, photography, cartography etc.

2. Major teaching content:

Week 1: Introduction: Reading Cities in Novels: Theories and Methods; Week 2: Venice: Multiple-faces of City; Week 3: Close Textual Reading; Week 4: Close Textual Reading; Week: 5 Presentation and Discussion: 1) What’s city? 2) What shapes it?; Week 6: Balzac’s Paris; Week 7: Close Textual Reading; Week 8: Close Textual Reading; Week 9: Presentation and Discussion: 1) How do the physical form and institutions of city mould or influence the spiritual life of its inhabitants? 2) How do you understand Simmel’s idea that modern city offers opportunities for the development of intellect and freedom of the individuals despite the price of blasé indifference and solipsism?; Week 10: Dickens’s London; Week 11: Close Textual Reading; Week 12: Close Textual Reading; Week 13: Presentation and Discussion: 1) What are the vocabulary of cityscape elements necessary for London to be “legible”? 2) Ronan Paddison suggests that each urban space is palimpsest and read in innumerable ways. How is the metaphor of palimpsest associated with collective memory of city dwellers? 3) Oscar Wilder remarked that London itself became foggier after the Impressionists painted its cityscape. Why?; Week 14: Dreiser’s Chicago and New York; Week 15: Close Textual Reading; Week 16: Close Textual Reading; Week 17: Representation and Discussion: 1) Plato maintained in Republic that any city, however small, is divided into two, one the city of poor, the other of the rich: these are at war with one another… Discuss on this notion. 2) Dreiser assumed that reader will recognize the significance of different locales such as indicators of economic status. Discuss on this assumption. 3) Is it possible to design or construct a city without division, segregation or riots?

^ Course Evaluation:

Quizzes on the texts 30%, presentations or discussion 30%, essay writing (within 3,000 words in English) 40%.

Textbook:

Jianfei Zhang. ed. Understanding Cities: Close Reading of Western Urban Novels.

List of Recommended References:

1. Ronan Paddison ed. Handbook of Urban Studies. Sage Publications Ltd, 2001.

2. Raymond Williams. The City and Country. Oxford University, 1974.

3. Hana Wirth-Nesher. City Codes: Reading Modern Urban Novel. Press Syndicate of Oxford University, 1996.

4. David Harvey. Paris, Capital of Paris. Routeledge, 2003.

5. Roy Porter. London, a Social History (4th Printing), 2001.

6. John Norwich, Allen Lane. Venice: Rise to Empire, 1977.

7. Carl Sandburg. Chicago Poems.

8. Edward Rutherfurd. New York: A Novel. Random Publishing House, 2010.


04 Field of Knowledge: Natural Sciences


0401 Physical Sciences

Introduction to High Energy Physics


Course Code: College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 2 Instructor: Zhang Zhenyu (China)

Course Content:

This course provides an up-to-date overview of both theoretical and experimental aspects of high energy physics. It presents the experimental foundations of the theory of particle interactions at the subnuclear level and the phenomenological approach to understanding experimental phenomena on the standard model, especialy on the J/psi and tau-charm physics.

Topics include:

1) Experimental Methods; 2) Quark Dynamics: the Strong Interaction; 3) Electroweak Interaction; 4) Some Special Topics.

Course Evaluation:

Regular score (50%), final exam (50%).

Textbook:

1. Wiley, Brian Martin. Nuclear and Particle Physics: An Introduction, 2006.

2. Robert N. Cahn and Gerson Goldhaber. The Experimental Foundations of Particle Physics (2nd Edition), Cambridge University Press, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Vernon D. Barger and Roger J.N. Phillips. Collider Physics: Revised Edition. Westview Press, 1996.

2. Donald H. Perkins. Introduction to High Energy Physics (4th Edition). Cambridge, 2000.

3. Alessandro Bettini. Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics. Cambridge University Press, 2008.


Solid State Physics


Course Code: 0700142 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Materials Science and Technology

Credits: 4 Instructor: Liu Huijun (China)

Course Content:

The objective of solid state physics is: (1) to study the crystal structure; (2) to study the interactions and motions of particles that compose a solid; (3) to study the application of physical properties of solid. We will mainly focus on the following six chapters:

1) Chapter 1 Crystal structure and diffraction; 2) Chapter 2 Crystal binding; 3) Chapter 3 Crystal vibration and thermal properties; 4) Chapter 4 Electron theory of solid; 5) Chapter 5 Energy band theory; 6) Chapter 6 Transport processes.

During the class, we will use both the multimedia and the blackboard. In addition to the classroom lectures, there will be also tutorials and homework.

Course Evaluation:

Homework (10%), 1st exam (40%), 2nd exam (50%).

Textbook:

Lu Dong, Jiang Pin, and Xu Zhizhong. Solid State Physics. Shanghai Science and Technology Press, 2003.

List of Recommended References:

1. Wiley, C. Kittel. Introduction to Solid State Physics. New York, 1996.

2. Kittel Charles. Introduction to Solid State Physics (8th Edition), 2005.


Optics


Course Code: 0700908 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 3 Instructor: Xiong Guiguang (China)

Course Content:

Optics is the branch of physics, which involves the behavior and properties of light, including its interactions with matter. The course of Optics is required for students in physics majors, but is open also to other science majors, who have the appropriate background and have met the prerequisites. This course deals with fundamental optics and optical techniques in greater depth so that the student is abreast of the activities in the forefront of the field. The goal of the course is to understand the nature of light, its propagation and interaction with matter.

The major teaching content of the course covers propagation of light, geometric optics, superposition of waves, polarization, interference, diffraction, Fourier optics, basics of coherence theory, and modern optics. This course also impacts the undergraduate research training programs.

This course is lectured in English and is associated with slides.

Course Evaluation:

Witten examination.

Textbook:

Eugene Hecht. ed. Optics (4th Edition). Addison Wesley, 2002.

List of Recommended References:

1. Max Born. Principles of Optics. Cambridge University Press, 1999.

2. M. H. Freeman. Optics. New York: Butterworth-Heinemam, 2005.


Computational Physics


Course Code: 0700277 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Hongyi School Physics Class

Credits: 4 Instructor: Cai Hao (China)

Course Content:

Computational physics is the study and implementation of numerical algorithms to solve problems in physics for which a quantitative theory already exists. It is often regarded as a subdiscipline of theoretical physics but some consider it an intermediate branch between theoretical and experimental physics. Physicists often have a very precise mathematical theory describing how a system will behave. It is often the case that solving the theory's equations ab initio in order to produce a useful prediction is not practical. This is especially true with quantum mechanics, where only a handful of simple models admit closed-form, analytic solutions. In cases where the equations can only be solved approximately, computational methods are often used.

This course hopes that the students master the required computational physics knowledge and methods to deal with the practical physics.

^ Course Evaluation:

Regular record (50%), final exam (50%).

Textbook:

Benjamin Cummings, Nicholas J. Giordano and Hisao Nakanishi. Computational Physics (2nd Edition), 2005.

List of Recommended References:

1. Numerical Recipes with Source Code CD-ROM 3rd Edition: The Art of Scientific Computing. Cambridge University Press, 2007.

2. Paul L. DeVries and Javier E. Hasbun. A First Course in Computational Physics. Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2010.


Classical Mechanics I


Course Code: 0700905 College: School of Physics and Technology

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Department of Physics

Credits: 3 Instructor: Shi Jing (China)

Course Content:

Classical Mechanics is the basis of physics, which includes two sections: one is the well-known Newton’s mechanics and the other involves analysis mechanics. The latter mainly contains Lagrange mechanical system and Hamilton mechanical system which will be the contents of Classical Mechanics II. In Classical Mechanics I we will study Newton’s mechanics which covers three main parts: 1) the basic motion law of a particle (point object): the kinematics of a particle, dynamics of a particle (both in inertial frame of reference and in non-inertial frame of reference); 2) the basic dynamical principles of system of many bodies: the momentum theorem and conservation, work-energy principle and energy conservation, the angular momentum theorem and conservation; 3) special system of many bodies and special motion states of the system of many bodies: rigid bodies, fluid, vibration and wave.




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