Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics icon

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics


Similar
Psychology 206 Spring Semester 2011...
This booklet is intended to help students entering Grade 9 or 10 in 2008/9 to learn as much as...
This booklet is intended to assist students and parents with charting a student’s four-year...
Mba, University of Rochester, William E. Simon School of Management, Rochester, ny...
Welcome to the booklist as suggested by the students and staff in bioe 202/mcb 493jlm course for...
Each semester, students must read a book of their choice and write a book review over the chosen...
At the beginning of the semester (first class meeting)...
Economics includes the study of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services...
Any student with a documented disability is welcome to contact me as early in the semester as...
Students will be able to understand and explain the concept of idioms...
B. A.(economics) 1971 Ohio University, J. D. 1979 University of Miami Ph. D...
Art of Music (orchestral string instruments), bachelor...



страницы: 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11
return to the beginning

^ Course Evaluation:

Class participation and discussion 10%, kindergarten observation report 10%, midterm exam 30%, group assignment and presentation 50%.

Textbook:

Edelman CL Mandle CL. Health Promotion Throughout the Lifespan (4th Edition). St. Louis: Mosby, 1998.

^ List of Recommended References:

1. Richard E. Behrman Nelson. Essentials of Pediatrics. World Book Publishing Company.

2. Health Promotion Throughout the Lifespan (4th Edition). Louis: Mosby, Edelman CL Mandle CL, 1998.


Community Health Nursing


Course Code: 1000239 College: HOPE School of Nursing

Semester: Fall Intended Students: The Fourth Year Students

Credits: Didactic 2; Clinical 4 Instructor: Luo Dan (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

1) Maintain a safe and effective care environment and professional behaviors; 2) Apply evidence-based practice into community health nursing; 3) Identify the roles of the community health nurse; 4) Discuss key concepts and relevance to community health nursing focused on individual/family/population, community health nursing practice of environmental and global/international health; 5) Implement the nursing process for a selected community; 6) Conduct a health promotion project in community.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Didactic: Chinese public system and policy; Introduction of community nursing; Practical skills in community nursing; Community assessment; Community diagnosis and planning; Health education practice; Community nursing intervention; Family-centered nursing; Nursing for population; Implementation and evaluation of community health promotion program.

2) Clinical: Health education; Health promotion program; Assigned community nursing work.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Didactic: Lecture, case studies, group activities, web-based activities and discussion, question and answer.

Clinical: Clinical experiences as assigned, clinical conferences, readings, practices.

Course Evaluation:

1. Didactic Grade: quiz 1 30%, quiz 2 30%, post-test 20%, article critique 10%, and attendance & performance 10%.

2. Grading of clinical practice: clinical log 15%, group community health project 50%, group health education project 30%, and attendance 5%.

Textbook:

Maurer, F. & Smith, C. Community/Public Health Nursing Practice: Health for Populations and Communities (4th Edition). St. Louis: Elsevier Saunders, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Nies, M. & McEwen, M. Community/Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Health of Populations (4th Edition). Saunders, 2006.

2. Stanhope, M. & Lancaster, J. Public Health Nursing: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community (7th Edition). Mosby, 2008.


07 Field of Knowledge: Management Sciences


0701 Public Administration

International English News, Speaking, Listening and Review


Course Code: 0500346 College: School of Political Science and Public Administration

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduates Majoring in Foreign Affairs

^ Credits: 4 Instructor: Feng Cunwan (China)

Course Content:

The general objective of this course is to cultivate and enhance students’ ability of information collection and analysis through comprehensive teaching methods of speaking, listening and reviews on news from international media like VOA, BBC and CRI. Students are required to grasp the basic principles and methods in fields of news information analysis, translation and interpretation skills. After the systematic study of the course in relevant period, students are expected to understand how to analyze the diversified phenomena in international society, how to obtain beneficial information from world-wide media and how to give neutral and scientific evaluation to the issues concerned. With instructor’s guidance, students should actively learn how to utilize professional knowledge to understand the current world-affairs and therefore prepare for the forming of professional capabilities. Students are encouraged to implement study task through ways of group discussion and individual presentation. News about international politics, economy, and cultural exchange will be arranged with priority.

^ Course Evaluation:

Attendance (10%), in-class involvement (10%), homework assignments (10%), final examination (70%).

Textbook:

Teaching materials with reserved copyrights, news album by VOA, BBC.

List of Recommended References:

1. Xin Li. Learning Guidance on Foreign English News Report. Press of Foreign Study, 2009.

2. Yi-Ge, Zhu. Linguistic Characteristics and Interpretation of English News. Press of Shanghai Communication University, 2008.

3. Qi-zhong Liu. English-Chinese News Translation. Tsing-hua University Press, 2009.


Administrative Organizations


Course Code: 0300125 College: School of Political Science and Public Administration

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Sophomores Majoring in Administrative Management

Credits: 3 Instructor: Tian Yunxiang (Taiwan, China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The primary purpose of the course is to equip students with an understanding of organizational concepts and the ability to apply their managerial knowledge appropriately and effectively in specific organizational contexts in today’s challenging environments.

More specifically, this course aims to: 1) develop a critical appreciation of the central theoretical questions, themes, and debates in the literature; 2) develop theorizing skills of abstraction, analysis and reasoning; 3) analyze organizational situations which are often complex and complicated, and acquire the ability to deal with them.

2. Major teaching content:

Ch1 Organizations and Organization Theory; Ch2 Strategy, Organization Design and Effectiveness; Ch3 Fundamentals of Organization Structure; Ch4 The External Environment; Ch5 Interorganizational Relationships; Ch6 Designing Organizations for the International Environment; Ch7 Manufacturing and Service Technologies; Ch8 Information Technology and Control; Ch9 Organization Size, Life Cycle and Decline; Ch10 Organizational Culture and Ethical Values; Ch11 Innovation and Change; Ch12 Decision-Making Processes; Ch13 Conflict, Power, and Politics.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

By means of lectures, readings, class discussion, case studies and personal research projects, this course will help students obtain a broad and in-depth understanding of the dynamics of organizations.

Course Evaluation:

Personal report 20%, group report 20%, final exam 50%, participation in class10%.

Textbook:

Richard L. Daft. Organizational Theory and Design (10th Edition). South-Western College, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Gareth R. Jones. Organizational Theory, Design, and Change (6th Edition). Prentice Hall, 2009.

2. Mary Jo Hatch and Ann L. Cunliffe. Organization Theory: Modern, Symbolic, and Postmodern Perspectives (2nd Edition). Oxford University Press, 2006.


0702 Library and Archive Science

Reference and Information Services


Course Code: College: School of Information Management

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Library Science

^ Credits: 3 Instructor: Jon Jablonski(USA)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course is designed to present an overview of reference and information services in a variety of settings, including: methods and models of information service delivery, basic tools for reference and information services, and emergent trends in reference and information service.

2. Major teaching content:

The course requires the students to study theories, history, methods, applications of reference service, including the historical evolution of reference and information service in libraries; traditional and emergent models of reference and information service; evaluation, selection, and use of general reference sources; evaluation and management of reference collections and services; issues in information technology and its impact on the provision of reference and information services.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Specific instructions on this process will be given in class. Students will lead the discussion on the readings they are responsible for each class period. This discussion should relate to other relevant readings on the class reading list and any related readings found by the student that are not on the list. For those books which do not have specific page numbers indicated, scan and read sections of interest and be prepared to lead the discussion on the sections you have selected. By the end of the seminar, students will have been exposed to the content of all the readings on the list as well as any additional readings cited during the course of the seminar.

^ Course Evaluation:

Seminar Paper =30%, Final Examination=70%.

Textbook:

Cassell, K.A., and Hiremath, U. Reference and Information Services in the 21st Century: An Introduction (2nd Edition). New York: Neal-Schuman, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Arist, S. Success in diversity: How three Illinois libraries embrace multiculturalism. ILI Reporter, 25 (5), 2007. 4-7.

2. Bell, S. J. Who needs a reference desk? Library issues: Briefings for Faculty and Administrators, 27 (6), 2007. Retrieved December 23, 2009, from: http://www.libraryissues.com/pub/2706Jul07.pdf.

3. Bishop, K., & Salveggi, A. Responding to developmental stages in reference services to children. Public Libraries, 40 (6), 2001. 35-38.

4. Boff, C., et al. Building uncommon community with a common book: The role of librarians as collaborators and contributors to campus reading programs. Research Strategies, 20 (4), 2007. 271-283.

5. Brattin, B. Reorganizing reference. Public Libraries, 44 (6), 2005. 340-346.

6. Bugg, K. L., & Odom, R. Y. Extreme makeover reference edition: Restructuring reference services at the Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center. The Reference Librarian, 50 (2), 2009. 193-204.

7. Dallis, D., & Walters, C. Reference services in the commons environment. Reference Services Review, 34 (2), 2006. 248-260.

8. Durrance, J. Factors that influence reference success. The Reference Librarian, no. 49/50, 1995. 243-265.

9. Elmborg, J. K. Teaching at the desk: Toward a reference pedagogy. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 2 (3), 2002. 455-464.

10. Genz, M. D. Working the reference desk. Library Trends, 46 (3), 1998. 505-525. Retrieved December 23, 2009, from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/8167.


Global Perspectives in Library and Information Science


Course Code: College: School of Information Management

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Library Science

Credits: 3 Instructor: Jon Jablonski(USA)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

This course is designed to present an overview of International Librarianship and Comparative Librarianship in a variety of settings. The course requires the students to study the theories, history, methods, applications of International Librarianship and Comparative Librarianship, and be familiar with the latest development of International Librarianship and Comparative Librarianship.

2. Major teaching content:

Major teaching content includes two parts: one is International Librarianship, and the other is Comparative Librarianship. We can further classify the content into nine parts, including: (1) The Internationalization of Librarianship; (2) Global Center Librarianship; (3) Issues related to Librarianship in Cross-cultural Communication and Multi-cultural Management; (4) International, Regional and National Information Policies; (5) Comparative Library Education and the Mortenson Center for International Library Programs and Global Librarianship Issues; (6) Globalization, Communication, Information, and the Role of NGOs; (7) Comparative Librarianship: Asia, Latin America, Middle East & Africa; (8) Comparative Librarianship: North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand; (9) International Information Systems. Students are expected to be familiar with the content of the items on the reading list for the course.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Specific instructions on this process will be given in class. Students will lead the discussion on the readings they are responsible for each class period. This discussion should be related to other relevant readings on the class reading list and any related readings found by the students that are not on the list. For those books which do not have specific page numbers indicated, scan and read sections of interest and be prepared to lead the discussion on the sections you have selected. By the end of the seminar, students will have been exposed to the content of all the readings on the list as well as any additional readings cited during the course of the seminar. Course Evaluation:

Seminar Paper =30%, Final Examination=70%.

Textbook:

IFLA Publications: Global Library and Information Science: A Textbook for Students and Educators. With Contributions from Africa, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, and North America.

List of Recommended References:

1. Bender, David R. Strategy for international information policy. Libri 43.3, July/Sept 1993. 210-231.

2. Borgman, Christine L. Will the global information infrastructure be the library of the future? Central and Eastern Europe as a case example. IFLA Journal 22.2, 1996. 121-127.

3. Brindley, Lynne. Uniting Europe. Public Library Journal 16.2, 2001. 56-57.

4. Burger, Robert H. Ch. 2: Information policy in an international context. Information Policy: A Framework for Evaluation and Policy Research. Ablex Publishing Company, 1993. 23-45.

5. Byrne, Alex. Promoting intellectural freedom globally through libraries: the role of IFLA. Libri 50.1, March, 2000. 60-68.

6. Davis, Jr., Donald G. Ch. 2: The history of library school internationalization. Internationalizing Library and Information Science Education. Harvey, John F., Carroll, Frances L. ed. Greenwood Press, 1987. 17-29.

7. Hiraldo, R. Abad; Pujol, J. Bover. International cultural exchange through libraries. International Librarianship: Cooperation and Collaboration. Carroll, Frances L., Harvey, John F. ed. Scarecrow Press, 2001. 73-86.

8. Kagan, Alfred. Living in the real world: a decade of progressive librarianship in the USA and in international library organizations. Innovation 22, June, 2001. 10-19.

9. Kirk, Joyce; Sellers, Svetlana. Ch. 6: Education and training. Librarianship and Information Work Worldwide. Line, Maurice. ed. Bowker_Sauer, 1999. 145-175.

10. Oppenheim, Charles. Do we need fresh thinking on national information policy? Alexandria 14.1, 2002. 1-2.


Logistics Technology and Operation Management


Course Code: 1100449 College: School of Information Management

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 3 Instructor: Zhang Min (China)

Course Content:

Logistics technology and operation management is one of the most significant courses for the undergraduates whose major is Electronic Commerce. It focuses on the modernized management science and technology and applies logistics technology to satisfy the request of customers. To achieve the teaching objectives, both theoretical knowledge and case study should be emphasized. Our course consists of 12 chapters, including the definition of logistics, supply chain management, transportation, third party logistics provider, retailing logistics, chain store, distribution center, international transportation, procurement, information management, customer service and packaging. Some experiments will be arranged to aid the theoretical learning. The school time is the sixth semester (fall).

Course Evaluation:

Experiments grade (40%) plus final test grade(60%).

Textbook:

Ouyang B., Zhang Y. Logistics English. Tsinghua University Press, 2010.

List of Recommended References:

Chopra,S., HYPERLINK "http://search.dangdang.com/book/search_pub.php?category=01&key2=Meindl&order=sort_xtime_desc" \t "_blank" Meindl, P. Supply Chain Management. Tsinghua University Press, 2008.


122






Download 0.76 Mb.
leave a comment
Page11/11
Date conversion31.08.2011
Size0.76 Mb.
TypeДокументы, Educational materials
Add document to your blog or website

страницы: 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11
Be the first user to rate this..
Your rate:
Place this button on your site:
docs.exdat.com

The database is protected by copyright ©exdat 2000-2017
При копировании материала укажите ссылку
send message
Documents

upload
Documents

Рейтинг@Mail.ru
наверх