Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics icon

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics


Similar
Psychology 206 Spring Semester 2011...
This booklet is intended to help students entering Grade 9 or 10 in 2008/9 to learn as much as...
This booklet is intended to assist students and parents with charting a student’s four-year...
Welcome to the booklist as suggested by the students and staff in bioe 202/mcb 493jlm course for...
Mba, University of Rochester, William E. Simon School of Management, Rochester, ny...
Economics includes the study of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services...
At the beginning of the semester (first class meeting)...
Each semester, students must read a book of their choice and write a book review over the chosen...
Any student with a documented disability is welcome to contact me as early in the semester as...
Students will be able to understand and explain the concept of idioms...
Art of Music (orchestral string instruments), bachelor...
B. A.(economics) 1971 Ohio University, J. D. 1979 University of Miami Ph. D...



страницы:   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11
01 Field of Knowledge: Economics

0101 Economics

Econometrics


Course Code: 0200087 College: Economics and Management School

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Bachelor of Economics

Credits: 3 Instructor: Li Zhuo (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

We intend to equip our students with sound econometric analysis capacity both theoretically and feasibly, to facilitate their further studies in the field of economics, and to improve their language ability.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Math introduction: Probability theory and statistics; Law of large numbers; Central Limit Theorem; Linear regression model; Matrix Algebra. (6-8 hours); 2) Econometrics: theory and methods: Single equation regression model; Hypothesis test; Multiple equations regression model; Time series model; Multiple equations time series regression model. (30 hours); 3) Econometrics lab works: instruction and implementation. (18 hours)

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

We emphasize that theoretic econometric theory and methods should be taught alongside the implementation methods in order to foster the research capacity of students. We will employ multi-media teaching toolkits such as PPT, computing presentation, etc., and we will use lab teaching resources extensively.

Course Evaluation:

3 exams during the course (20% of total score), 6 lab works (20% of total score) and final exam (60% of total score).

Textbook:

Jeffrey Wooldridge. Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach (4th Edition). Thompson Learning, South-Western Press, 2006.

List of Recommended References:

1. Ramanathan, R. Introductory Econometrics with Applications (4th Edition). The Dryden Press, 1998.

2. Stock, H. and M. Watson. Introduction to Econometrics. Addison Wesley, 2002.

3. Newbold, P., Carlson, W. and B. Thorne. Statistics for Business and Economics (6th Edition). Prentice-Hall, 2006.


02 Field of Knowledge: Law

0201 Law

International Law


Course Code: College: School of Law

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduate Students

Credits: 3 Instructor: Feng Jiehan (China)

Course Content:

The course is designed to provide a detailed overview of international law in a broad context. It's designed primarily for those who have not previously studied the subject. The course is organized into three parts. The first part of the course offers a general introduction to international law, asking whether and to what extent international law is “really law,” examining international-relations approaches to IL in political science, and surveying theoretical approaches from legal scholarship. The second section of the course examines general principles of international law, including the key actors, the creation and sources of international law, the interpretation of international law by courts and tribunals, the problem of enforcement, and the relationship between international and national (or “municipal” law). In the third and final part of the course, we examine selected specialized areas of international law, including state territory, law of the sea, space law, use of force and arms control, international criminal law, and international humanitarian law.

Course Evaluation:

The exam consists of three parts:

1. (20% of the grade) Positively take participation in discussion on the classes.

2. (40% of the grade) Students will take part in two moot court competition, to write a memorial and to give their oral presentation.

3. (40% of the grade) Students may choose between two subjects consisting of a theoretical problem to be developed starting from one of the cases discussed during the course.

Textbook:

Malcolm N. Shaw. International Law, Peking University Press.

List of Recommended References:

1.Barry E. Carter, Phillip R. Trimble and Allen S. Weiner. ed. ^ International Law (5th Edition). Wolters Kluwer, 2007.

2.Sean D. Murphy. Principles of International Law. St. Paul: Thomson/West, 2006.

3.Jeffrey L. Dunoff, Steven R. Ratner, David Wippman. International Law: Norms, Actors, Process: A Problem-Oriented Approach (2nd Edition). Aspen Law and Business Publishers, 2006.


^ International Environmental Law


Course Code: 0300039 College: School of Law

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Juniors

Credits: 2 Instructor: Qin Tianbao (Chinese)

Course Content:

The aims of this course are: a. to help students to grasp international environmental law’s basic concepts, principals, and its operation; b. to help students to learn about the history of international environmental law; c. to help students to understand and be capable to deal with international environmental disputes; d. to increase students’ legal consciousness to international environmental protection.

The contents include: a. Global environmental problems and its root causes; b. Environmental issues and their challenges to international law; c. History of international environmental law; d. The concept, sources, subjects and objects, principles, implementation, responsibilities and liabilities of international environmental law; e. International law on the issues of atmosphere, freshwater, ocean, biodiversity, land, outer space, cultural and natural heritage, hazardous substances, wastes, and trade and environment.

Following the basic principle of interplaying between teacher and students, the course will be taught by multi-forms, such as teaching, seminar, role-play, lectures by famous professors, and watching teaching videos in order to train the abilities of students to analyze and solve problems. As a monolingual course, English runs through the whole process of the course. The teacher uses the original version of foreign textbook and English multi-media courseware, teaches in oral English, and does exercises in English. In the final examination, all questions are in English and should be answered in English.

Course Evaluation:

Discussion, Moot court and/or Examination.

Textbook:

^ UNITAR ELP. International Environmental Law. UNITAR, 2007.

List of Recommended References:

1. Wang Xi. International Environmental Law (2nd Edition). China Law Press, 2005.

2. Alexandre Kiss, Translated by Zhang Ruosi. International Environmental Law (Chinese Version). China Law Press, 2000.

3. Patricia W. Birnie et al. International Law & The Environment. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2002.

4. David Hunter et al. International Environmental Law & Policy. Foundation Press, 2002.

5. Training Manual on International Environmental Law. UNEP, 2007.

6. Websites of Main International Environmental Organizations and Conventions.


International Commercial Arbitration Moot Course


Course Code: 0300379 College: School of Law

Semester: Fall Intended Students: undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: He Qisheng (China)

Susan Gale Wintermuth (US)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The aim of this course is to train law student an international vision and international competitive power, which to be specific is fourfold: firstly, to encourage the study of international commercial law, private international law and arbitration for resolution of international business disputes; secondly, law leaders of tomorrow will be trained to tackle a practically relevant problem of a client engaged in international commerce and thus gain a practical insight into the international Alternative Dispute Settlement (ADR); thirdly, students can deepen their knowledge in legal English through the preparation of memoranda and the oral presentation of it before a Tribunal; lastly, the course provides the in-campus Chinese students an opportunity to engage in the international moot feast, as the best student would form a team to compete in Vienna and Hong Kong with more than 300 teams from the whole world.

2. Major teaching content:

1) International Commercial Arbitration Law; 2) International Trade Law, including lectures on CISG, Incoterms and L/C, etc.; 3) Legal advocacy; 4) Legal documents writing, including memorandum and brief; 5) Training on legal and academic English.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

1) Case study; 2) English as the teaching language; 3) International background teachers; 4) Student-driven method; 5) One-by-one training; 6) International Moot Preceding.

Course Evaluation:

1. Regular evaluation: attendance, participation, discussion, homework and quiz;

2. Final exam: Competition or writing.

Textbook:

Self-designed teaching materials.

List of Recommended References:

1. Klaus Peter Berger. Private Dispute Resolution in International Business, Negotiation, Mediation, Arbitration (II volumes). Kluwer Law International, 2000.

2. Klaus Peter Berger. Private Dispute Resolution in International Business, Negotiation, Mediation, Arbitration Vol. II. Kluwer Law International, 2006.

3. Bernstein, H., Lookofsky, J. Understanding the CISG in Europe. Kluwer Law International: London, 2003.

4. Bianca, C. and Bonell, M. Commentary on the International Sales Law: The 1980 Vienna Sales Convention. Milan, 1987.

5. Michael Bridge. The International Sale of Goods Law and Practice (2nd Edition). Oxford University Press, 2007.

6. Born, G. B. International Commercial Arbitration (3rd Edition). Kluwer Law International: Alphen aan den Rijn, 2009.

7. Michael W. Bühler, Thomas H. Webster. Handbook of ICC Arbitration: Commentary, Precedents, Materials. Sweet & Maxwell, 2005.

8. Honnold, J. O. Uniform Law for International Sales: Under the 1980 United Nations Convention (3rd Edition). Kluwer Law International: The Hague, 1999.

9. Huber, Mullis. The CISG---A New Textbook for Students and Practitioners. Munich: Sellier European Law Publishers, 2007.

10. Redfern, A., Hunter, M., Blackaby, N., Partasides, C. Law and Practice of International Commercial Arbitration (4th Edition). London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2004.

11. Peter Schlechtriem. Commentary on the UN Convention on the International Sale of Goods (2nd Edition). Oxford University Press, 2005.

12. John Felemegas. An International Approach to the Interpretation of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sales of Goods 1980 as Uniform Sales Law.


International Taxation Law


Course Code: 0200081 College: School of Law

Semester: Spring Intended Students: undergraduate student

Credits: 2 Instructor: Cui Xiaojing (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

During the process of teaching and learning in English, students are supposed to learn about the history, development and principles of international taxation law, including international taxation treaties and individual income taxation law. Students will also learn about concepts and characteristics of international taxation, including jurisdiction, double taxation, overlap taxation and its solution, tax evasion and avoidance, and China’s foreign-related corporate income taxation law.

2. Major teaching content:

1) International taxation jurisdiction; 2) International double taxation, overlap taxation, evasion and avoidance; 3) International taxation treaties; 4) China’s foreign-related taxation laws and regulations.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Based on multimedia teaching, the course will combine hardware facilities and modern education technologies and some traditional teaching methods. With the help of multimedia, lots of pictures, animation and videos will be incorporated in the course, with a view to making teaching and learning interactive. Some multimedia materials will also be put online for students’ self-studies after class. Theories and numerous case studies will be combined in teaching to help students better understand abstract concepts in international taxation law.

Course Evaluation:

Case study, discussion in class and translation of chapters from classic articles.

Textbook:

Roy Rohatgi. Basic International Taxation.

List of Recommended References:

1. Brian J. Arnold and Michael J. McIntyre. International Tax Primer, 2003.

2. Reuven S. Avi-Yonah. U. S. International Taxation, 2002.


International Investment Law


Course Code: 0300026 College: School of Law

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates in Law

Credits: Instructor: Zhang Qinglin (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

Making students learn legal system of foreign direct investment.

2. Major teaching content:

Nature, Evolution, and Context of International Investment Law; Interpretation and Application of Investment Treaties; Investors and Investments; Investment Contracts; Bilateral investment treaties; Multilateral instruments on foreign investment; Expropriation; Standards of Protection; Political Risk Insurance; Settling Investment Disputes.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Explanation and discussion.

^ Course Evaluation:

Written examination,or making a presentation (~15 minutes).

Textbook:

Principles of International Investment Law.

List of Recommended References:

The International Law on Foreign Investment.


International Intellectual Property Law


Course Code: 0300118 College: School of Law

Semester: Fall Intended Students: L.L.B Candidates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Nie Jianqiang (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

1) To improve students’ understanding of international intellectual property law in English; 2) To broaden students’ perspective of international intellectual property law; 3) To promote internationalisation of international law teaching in Wuhan University and to realise the goal of Wuhan Univesity as “China’s characterisitic, well-known internationally and top university in the world”.

2. Major teaching content:

1) Introduction to International Intellectual Property Law; 2) International Patent Law; 3) International Copyright Law; 4) International Trademark and other Identifiers Law; 5) International Law on Protection of Industrial Design, Integrated Circuits, Plant Varieties, Undisclosed Information; 6) International Enforcement of Intellectual Property; 7) Chinese and International Intellectual Property System.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

English teaching, PPT and Website.

Course Evaluation:

Participation 40%, oral presentation or written paper 30% and final exam 30%.

Textbook:

1. Frederick Abbott, Thomas Cottier and Francis Gurry. ed. The International Intellectual Property System in an Integrated Economy. Aspen Publishers, 2007.

2. A new textbook will be edited for Chinese LL.B students.

List of Recommended References:

1. Frederick Abbott, Thomas Cottier and Francis Gurry. ed. International Intellectual Property in an Integrated World Economy. Aspen Publishers, 2007.

2. Carlos M. Correa. Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights---A Commentary on the TRIPS Agreement. Oxford University Press, 2007.


Maritime Law


Course Code: 0300051 College: School of Law

Semester: Fall Intended Students: Undergraduates

Credits: 2 Instructor: Zhang Xianglan (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The Curriculum of Maritime Law of Wuhan University is not only in compliance with the purposes of educational reform, but also provides students with knowledge as well as capability. A large presence of alumni is discernible across different domains, such as, the Ministry of Commerce (Zhang Hao, Deputy Director, Department of Treaty and Law; Ma Lin, official of Chinese Mission to WTO), the Development Research Center of State Council (Wang Huaiyu, researcher), ABN AMRO China Limited (Xia Xin, Legal Adviser), Sina-US Legal Exchange Foundation (Guo Yi, program manager, contact person in Hong Kong), and University of Ghent, Belgium (Liu Nengye, Doctor Candidate).

2. Major teaching content:

Generally, the course covers about the basic knowledges, principles and conceptions of Maritime Law. The manual is intended to introduce the basic concepts, theories, systems and rules, and major institutions will be covered, such as vessel and seamen, carriage of goods by sea, charterparty, towage at sea, collision at sea, salvage, general average, vessel –sourced pollution, limitation of civil liabilities, marine insurance and maritime dispute settlement.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

We use whole English teaching methodology. In the process of teaching, we use multi-media such as PPT. Meanwhile, we also focus on the theory combined with practice and cases analysis in order to strengthen the students’ English ability and their motivation in studying Maritime Law. Course Evaluation:

Open-book examination.

Text book:

Maritime Law (Self-compiling Teaching Materials).

List of Recommended References:

1. Christopher Hill. Maritime Law (5th Edition). Printed by Bodmin, Gornwall, 2005.

2. Thomas J. Schoenbaum. Admiralty and Maritime Law (4th Edition). West Publishing Company, 2004.

3. Xianglan Zhang. U.S. Admiralty-Cases & Comments. Wuhan University Press, 1995.


Competition Law


Course Code: 0300061 College: Law School

Semester: Fall Intended Students: The Undergraduate Students of the Science of Law

Credits: 3 Instructor: Sun Jin (China)

Course Content:

1. Teaching objectives:

The course is set up for the training needs of legal professionals on the socialist market economy. Though competition law is a new legal subject, it involves important systems of market economy. Students will have a preliminary basis in competition law theory and a general understanding of the cutting-edge theory of competition law in the world by explaining competition law principles and relevant national competition law disciplines in English. Meanwhile, through English teaching mode, students will achieve the capacity of finding foreign literature in English for further study.

2. Major teaching content:

The course teaches the basic principles of competition law and its basic system of our country which includes antitrust law and unfair competition law. At the same time it gives a focused introduction of the overview on competition law of European Union, the United Kingdom, the United States, Japan, Korea and China so that students can understand and master the spirit of competition of the social socialist market economy laws and regulations and the relevant competition laws in more developed countries in the world as fully and accurately as possible. Students will have a preliminary understanding of similarities and differences of competition laws under different social systems.

3. Teaching methods and approaches:

Teaching methods: 1) combining mobilizing the enthusiasm of students and playing a leading role by teachers; 2) combining teaching in English by teachers and participating in the discussion by students; 3) combining classroom learning and reading after class; 4) combining textbook learning and research reports; 5) combining theoretical study and case analysis.

Teaching approaches: Slides, a small blackboard, multimedia and so on.

^ Course Evaluation:

Class discussion records at ordinary times, assessment records and a final exam on case studies.

Textbook:

Kiel. N. Hilton. Antitrust Law. Peking University Press, 2009.

List of Recommended References:

1. Vivek Ghosal and Johan Stennek. The Political Economy of Antitrust.

2. Hanns Ullrich. The Evolution of European Competition Law.

3. Lorenzo Federico Pace. European Antitrust Law.

4. Femi Alese. Federal Antitrust and EC Competition Law Analysis.

5. Kenji Suzuki. Competition Law Reform in Britain and Japan.

6. Wang Ye. Competition Law. Social Sciences Academic Press, 2007.

7. Sun Jin. Antitrust Law---System and Principle. Wuhan University Press, October, 2010.

8. Sun Jin, Li Shengli. New Theory of Competition Law. Wuhan University Press, December 2010.

9. E. Kiel Horn, WE. Cova West. The Antitrust Laws and the Economy. China Renmin University Press, 2007.


Property Law of the United States


Course Code: College: School of Law

Semester: Spring Intended Students: Seniors; Graduate Students

Credits: 2 Instructor: Yong Gan (China)

Course Content:

This course deals with characteristic arrangements under American law for the creation and transfer of rights to control and exploit property. The relationships of these arrangements to efficient resource use, the pattern of wealth distribution, and other social concerns will be explored as they are reflected in both judicial decision-making and legislative reform. Subject to variations of emphasis in light of the students preexisting knowledge, topics will cover aspects of commercial land transfers such as sale contracts, mortgages, leases, conveyances, recording, and other methods of title assurance; and means of limiting private land-use in the public interest such as zoning, health and safety regulations, protection of minority or economically disadvantaged groups, eminent domain, and taxes. The historical categories and assumptions of American real property law will be considered with a view to examining their relevance to modern social and economic conditions. The course will be taught in a Socratic way through reading and discussing important cases.窗体底端

Course Evaluation:

Open-book exam/oral exam through moot-court.

Textbook:

Course Materials edited by Teacher.

List of Recommended References:

1. John G. Sprankling. Understanding Property Law. LexisNexis/Mathew Bender, March, 2007.

2. Joseph William Singer. Property Law: Rules, Policies and Practices. Aspan Publishers Inc., June, 2006.





Download 0.76 Mb.
leave a comment
Page1/11
Date conversion31.08.2011
Size0.76 Mb.
TypeДокументы, Educational materials
Add document to your blog or website

страницы:   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11
Be the first user to rate this..
Your rate:
Place this button on your site:
docs.exdat.com

The database is protected by copyright ©exdat 2000-2017
При копировании материала укажите ссылку
send message
Documents

upload
Documents

Рейтинг@Mail.ru
наверх