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^ Additional Information


A care plan may be known by other names eg support plan, individual plan. It is the document where day-to-day requirements and preferences for care and support are detailed


An individual is someone requiring care or support.


Others may include:

  • the individual

  • family members

  • advocate

  • line manager

  • other professionals.


Agreed ways of working will include policies and procedures where these exist.


Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient.


Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 1, 2, 3 and 4 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Be able to prepare to implement care plan activities



1.1 Identify sources of information about the individual and specific care plan activities

1.2 Establish the individual’s preferences about carrying out care plan activities

1.3 Confirm with others own understanding of the support required for care plan activities











2. Be able to support care plan activities

2.1 Provide support for care plan activities in accordance with the care plan and with agreed ways of working

2.2 Encourage the active participation of an individual in care plan activities

2.3 Adapt actions to reflect the individual’s needs or preferences during care plan activities











3. Be able to maintain records of care plan activities



3.1 Record information about implementation of care plan activities, in line with agreed ways of working

3.2 Record signs of discomfort, changes to an individual’s needs or preferences, or other indications that care plan activities may need to be revised










4. Be able to contribute to reviewing activities in the care plan



4.1 Describe own role and roles of others in reviewing care plan activities

4.2 Seek feedback from the individual and others on how well specific care plan activities meet the individual’s needs and preferences

4.3 Contribute to review of how well specific care plan activities meet the individual’s needs and preferences

4.4 Contribute to agreement on changes that may need to be made to the care plan














Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 57: Support Individuals to Eat and Drink

Unit code:

HSC 2014

Unit reference number:

M/601/8054

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

2

Guided learning hours:

15



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It is for those who provide support for one or more individuals to eat and drink, where substantial support is needed.

Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.


All learning outcomes must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


An individual is someone requiring care or support.


Suitable options will take account of:

  • expressed wishes and preferences

  • general nutrition principles

  • specific dietary requirements

  • religious, cultural and personal beliefs

  • resources available.


Ways to prepare to eat and drink may include

    • choosing where to eat

    • choosing with whom to eat

    • protecting clothes from potential spills

    • taking up a comfortable position.


Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient.


^ Agreed ways of working will include policies and procedures where these exist.


Assessment methodology

This unit is assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Be able to support individuals to make choices about food and drink

1.1 Establish with an individual the food and drink they wish to consume

1.2 Encourage the individual to select suitable options for food and drink

1.3 Describe ways to resolve any difficulties or dilemmas about the choice of food and drink

1.4 Describe how and when to seek additional guidance about an individual’s choice of food and drink











2. Be able to prepare to provide support for eating and drinking

2.1 Identify the level and type of support an individual requires when eating and drinking

2.2 Demonstrate effective hand-washing and use of protective clothing when handling food and drink

2.3 Support the individual to prepare to eat and drink, in a way that meets their personal needs and preferences

2.4 Provide suitable utensils to assist the individual to eat and drink











3. Be able to provide support for eating and drinking

3.1 Describe factors that help promote an individual’s dignity, comfort and enjoyment while eating and drinking

3.2 Support the individual to consume manageable amounts of food and drink at their own pace

3.3 Provide encouragement to the individual to eat and drink

3.4 Support the individual to clean themselves if food or drink is spilt

3.5 Adapt support in response to an individual’s feedback or observed reactions while eating and drinking











4. Be able to clear away after food and drink

4.1 Explain why it is important to be sure that an individual has chosen to finish eating and drinking before clearing away

4.2 Confirm that the individual has finished eating and drinking

4.3 Clear away used crockery and utensils in a way that promotes active participation.

4.4 Support the individual to make themselves clean and tidy after eating or drinking











5. Be able to monitor eating and drinking and the support provided

5.1 Explain the importance of monitoring the food and drink an individual consumes and any difficulties they encounter

5.2 Carry out and record agreed monitoring processes

5.3 Report on the support provided for eating and drinking in accordance with agreed ways of working














Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 58: Support Individuals to Meet Personal Care Needs

Unit code:

HSC 2015

Unit reference number:

F/601/8060

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

2

Guided learning hours:

16



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It provides the knowledge and skills needed to support individuals to meet personal care needs.


It covers support the individual to use toilet facilities, maintain personal hygiene and manage their personal appearance.

Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.


All learning outcomes must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


Personal care in this unit refers to using toilet facilities, maintaining personal hygiene and attending to personal appearance.


An individual is someone requiring care or support.


Toilet facilities may include:

  • toilet

  • commode

  • bedpan

  • urinal.


Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient.


Activities an individual may use to manage their personal appearance may include:

  • hair care

  • nail care

  • shaving

  • skin care

  • use of cosmetics

  • use of prostheses and orthoses.


Others may include:

  • family

  • friends

  • advocates

  • specialists

  • health care professionals

  • others who are important to the individual’s well being.



Assessment methodology

This unit is assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Be able to work with individuals to identify their needs and preferences in relation to personal care

1.1 Encourage an individual to communicate their needs, preferences and personal beliefs affecting their personal care

1.2 Establish the level and type of support and individual needs for personal care

1.3 Agree with the individual how privacy will be maintained during personal care










2. Be able to provide support for personal care safely

2.1 Support the individual to understand the reasons for hygiene and safety precautions

2.2 Use protective equipment, protective clothing and hygiene techniques to minimise the risk of infection

2.3 Explain how to report concerns about the safety and hygiene of equipment or facilities used for personal care

2.4 Describe ways to ensure the individual can summon help when alone during personal care

2.5 Ensure safe disposal of waste materials











3. Be able to support individuals to use the toilet



3.1 Provide support for the individual to use toilet facilities in ways that respect dignity

3.2 Support individual to make themselves clean and tidy after using toilet facilities










4. Be able to support individuals to maintain personal hygiene

4.1 Ensure room and water temperatures meet individual needs and preferences for washing, bathing and mouth care

4.2 Ensure toiletries, materials and equipment are within reach of the individual

4.3 Provide support to carry out personal hygiene activities in ways that maintain comfort, respect dignity and promote active participation










5. Be able to support individuals to manage their personal appearance

5.1 Provide support to enable individual to manage their personal appearance in ways that respect dignity and promote active participation

5.2 Encourage the individual to keep their clothing and personal care items clean, safe and secure











6. Be able to monitor and report on support for personal care

6.1 Seek feedback from the individual and others on how well support for personal care meets the individual’s needs and preferences

6.2 Monitor personal care functions and activities in agreed ways

6.3 Record and report on an individual’s personal care in agreed ways













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 59: Support Individuals to Manage Continence

Unit code:

HSC 2016

Unit reference number:

J/601/8058

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

3

Guided learning hours:

19



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those who work in a wide range of settings.


The unit provides the learner with the knowledge and skills needed to support individuals to manage continence.


It covers the factors affecting continence, the management of continence and the use of continence equipment.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care Development’s QCF Assessment Principles.


Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


An individual is someone requiring care or support.


Lifestyle factors affecting continence may include:

  • diet

  • patterns of eating and drinking

  • exercise and mobility

  • use of medication

  • daily routines.


Equipment may include:

  • pads

  • commode

  • bedpan

  • urinal.


Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient.


Risks may include risks to:

  • the individual

  • the learner

  • others.



Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand factors that affect the management of continence

1.1 Explain how difficulties with continence can affect an individual’s self esteem, health and their day-to-day activities

1.2 List common causes of difficulties with continence

1.3 Explain how an individual’s personal beliefs and values may affect the management of continence

1.4 Describe ways to protect an individual’s privacy whilst managing continence










2. Be able to support individuals to manage their own continence

2.1 Encourage an individual to express preferences and concerns about continence needs

2.2 Support the individual to understand the effects of lifestyle on continence

2.3 Explain how and when to access additional guidance about support for continence










3. Be able to support the use of equipment to manage continence

3.1 Access information about continence equipment recommended for the individual

3.2 Agree with the individual their preferred times and places for using continence equipment

3.3 Agree the level and type of support required for use of equipment

3.4 Support the individual to use continence equipment in ways that respect dignity and privacy and promote active participation










4. Be able to support continence safely

4.1 Identify risks that may arise while supporting continence

4.2 Encourage the individual to maintain personal hygiene whilst managing continence

4.3 Dispose of used equipment and soiled materials safely

4.4 Ensure the environment is clean, tidy and accessible before and after use

4.5 Use protective equipment, protective clothing and hygiene techniques to minimise risks










5. Be able to monitor and report on support for managing continence

5.1 Use agreed processes to monitor continence and support for managing continence

5.2 Record and report on support for managing continence in agreed ways














Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 60: Provide Agreed Support for Foot Care

Unit code:

HSC 2017

Unit reference number:

R/601/8063

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

3

Guided learning hours:

23



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those who working in a wide range of settings.


It is for learners who provide foot care for individuals as specified by a podiatrist. It covers the practical treatment of feet as well as knowledge about common conditions of the feet.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.


Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


Medical conditions may include:

  • diabetes

  • arthritis

  • peripheral vascular disease

  • eczema

  • hallux abductovalgus operations.


Assessed foot care needs are the needs and treatments specified for an individual by a podiatrist.


An individual is someone requiring care or support.


Equipment may include:

  • rasps

  • files

  • scissors

  • forceps

  • drills

  • probes.


Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient.


Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand the signs and causes of foot and toe-nail abnormalities

1.1 Describe the effects of common medical conditions on the feet and toe-nails

1.2 Describe the possible effects of unsanitary living conditions and unsuitable footwear on the feet and toe-nails










2. Be able to prepare to provide support for assessed foot care needs

2.1 Ascertain information about an individual’s assessed foot care needs

2.2 Ensure the setting for foot care meets the individual’s preferences and maintains privacy

2.3 Prepare the equipment required for treatment

2.3 Prepare the individual’s feet for treatment, in a way that promotes active participation

2.4 Describe how and when to access additional guidance about assessed foot care needs










3. Be able to promote the individual’s engagement in their own foot care

3.1 Support the individual’s understanding of any treatments, equipment or dressings to be used

3.2 Invite feedback from the individual on how their foot care is carried out

3.3 Explain why advice should not be given unless agreed with the podiatrist










4. Be able to provide foot care safely

4.1 Carry out agreed foot care treatments in accordance with instructions

4.2 Operate equipment safely and in accordance with instructions

4.3 Use protective equipment, protective clothing and hygiene techniques to minimise risks

4.4 Dispose of waste products safely










5. Be able to record and report on foot care

5.1 Record the condition of the individual’s feet before treatment

5.2 Record treatments carried out

5.3 Explain how to record any adverse reactions or responses to treatments or dressings

5.4 Report on foot care treatments, conditions and reactions in agreed ways













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 61: Gain Access to the Homes of Individuals, Deal with Emergencies and Ensure Security on Departure

Unit code:

HSC 2019

Unit reference number:

R/601/7902

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

2

Guided learning hours:

14



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those who support individuals to live in their own home. It provides the learner with the knowledge and skills required to gain access to an individual’s home, deal with emergencies and ensure security on departure.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development’s QCF Assessment Principles. All learning outcomes must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


An individual is someone requiring care or support.


General and specific requirements may include:

  • how, when and who to notify of visit

  • means of identification on arrival

  • use of entry systems

  • ways of ensuring security on departure.


Others are those who share responsibility for the worker providing care or support in the individual’s home.


Reasons for being unable to access homes may include:

  • individual not aware of visit

  • individual likely to be out

  • individual unwilling to allow access

  • individual unable to allow access because of accident or illness

  • power failure of security systems

  • incorrect information supplied to worker

  • keys lost or stolen

  • security or other risk to individual or worker.


Agreed ways of working will include policies and procedures where these exist.


Emergencies include any situation presenting immediate danger to the individual or others.


Assessment methodology

This unit is assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Be able to identify agreed ways to gain entry to and leave individuals’ homes

1.1 Access information about general requirements for entering and leaving individuals’ homes

1.2 Identify special requirements and individual preferences for entering and leaving an individual’s home










2. Be able to gain entry to individuals’ homes

2.1 Inform the individual and others about a planned visit

2.2 Identify self on arrival by agreed means

2.3 Gain entry to the individual’s home in agreed ways











3. Be able to take appropriate action when unable to gain entry to individuals' homes

3.1 Find out possible reasons for being unable to gain entry, using agreed ways of working

3.2 Agree with others what steps to take if entry cannot be gained after further efforts

3.3 Record and report on actions taken when unable to access an individual’s home

3.4 Explain why it is important to record and report on difficulties with access










4. Be able to deal with emergencies encountered after gaining entry

4.1 Describe emergencies that may be encountered when gaining entry to an individual’s home

4.2 Deal with an emergency encountered after gaining entry, using agreed ways of working

4.3 Record and report on an emergency encountered after gaining entry, and how the emergency has been addressed










5. Be able to ensure security when leaving individuals’ homes

5.1 Implement general and specific requirements about leaving an individual’s home

5.2 Ensure that an individual’s home is secure when leaving the premises










6. Be able to review procedures for entering and leaving individuals' homes

6.1 Support the individual to give feedback on arrangements for entering and leaving their home

6.2 Support the individual to understand any difficulties encountered in accessing and leaving their home, and risks that may arise

6.3 Contribute to agreement with the individual and others on ways to overcome difficulties and improve arrangements

6.4 Carry out agreed changes in arrangements for entering and leaving the individual’s home














Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 62: Contribute to the Care of a Deceased Person

Unit code:

HSC 2022

Unit reference number:

R/601/8256

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

3

Guided learning hours:

24



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It provides the learner with the knowledge and skills required to contribute to the care, preparation and transfer of the deceased individual and provide immediate support to those affected by the death.

Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.


Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 must be assessed in a real work environment in ways that do not intrude on the privacy of those involved.


Additional Information


Agreed ways of working will include policies and procedures where these exist.


Others may include:

  • family

  • friends

  • own colleagues

  • others who were involved in the life of the individual.


Appropriate organisations may include:

    • mortuary

    • funeral directors

    • places of worship.

Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 are assessed in the workplace or in conditions resembling the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Know the factors that affect how individuals are cared for after death


1.1 Outline legal requirements and agreed ways of working that underpin the care of deceased individuals

1.2 Describe how beliefs and religious and cultural factors affect how deceased individuals are cared for

1.3 Identify the physical changes that take place after death and how this may affect laying out and moving individuals

1.4 Identify diseases and conditions that necessitate specialist treatment or precautions when caring for and transferring deceased individuals

1.5 Describe the precautions needed when undertaking the care and transfer of deceased individuals with specific high risk diseases and conditions











2. Be able to contribute to supporting those who are close to deceased individuals



2.1 Describe the likely immediate impact of an individual’s death on others who are close to the deceased individual

2.2 Support others immediately following the death of the individual in ways that:

  • reduce their distress

  • respect the deceased individual













3. Be able to contribute to preparing deceased individuals prior to transfer


3.1 Follow agreed ways of working to ensure that the deceased person is correctly identified

3.2 Carry out agreed role in preparing the deceased individual in a manner that respects their dignity, beliefs and culture

3.3 Use protective clothing to minimise the risk of infection during preparation of the deceased individual

3.4 Contribute to recording any property and valuables that are to remain with the deceased individual










4. Be able to contribute to transferring deceased individuals



4.1 Carry out agreed role in contacting appropriate organisations

4.2 Carry out agreed role in transferring the deceased individual in line with agreed ways of working and any wishes expressed by the individual

4.3 Record details of the care and transfer of the deceased person in line with agreed ways of working










5. Be able to manage own feelings in relation to the death of individuals


5.1 Identify ways to manage own feelings in relation to an individual’s death

5.2 Utilise support systems to deal with own feelings in relation to an individual’s death













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 63: Contribute to Supporting Group Care Activities

Unit code:

HSC 2023

Unit reference number:

L/601/9471

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

3

Guided learning hours:

23



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It provides the learner with the knowledge and skills required to support individuals to participate in and enjoy group care activities.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in line with Skills for Care and Development’s QCF Assessment Principles.

Learning outcomes 2, 3 and 4 must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


Group care activities may include:

  • recreational or leisure activities

  • visits outside the usual setting

  • social activities.


Individuals are those requiring care or support.


Well-being includes the following aspects:

    • physical

    • emotional

    • social

    • spiritual.


Others may include:

  • carers and family members

  • line manager

  • therapists or other specialists who may recommend group care activities

  • the local community.


Agreed ways of working will include policies and procedures where these exist.


Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3 and 4 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand the place of group care activities in the care and support of individuals

1.1 Explain how participating in group care activities can benefit an individual’s identity, self-esteem and well-being

1.2 Identify examples of when a group care activity may be the best way to meet an individual’s care or support needs

1.3 Explain why dilemmas may arise when providing support for individuals through group care activities











2. Be able to contribute to the development of a supportive group culture

2.1 Support group members to understand the benefits of group activities

2.2 Encourage interaction between new and existing group members that promotes enjoyment, co-operation, inclusion and well-being

2.3 Describe ways to support group members to resolve any conflicts that may arise amongst themselves










3. Be able to contribute to the implementation of group care activities


3.1 Work with individuals and others to agree approaches, content and methods for group care activities

3.2 Carry out agreed role to support individuals and the group during activities

3.3 Address any adverse effects and maximise benefits for individuals during activities

3.4 Maintain records about group care activities in line with agreed ways of working










4. Be able to contribute to the evaluation of group care activities


4.1 Contribute to agreeing with individuals and others the processes, roles and criteria for assessing group care activities

4.2 Carry out agreed role in contributing to the evaluation of the processes, effects and outcomes of group activities

4.3 Describe ways to ensure that individuals and others are actively involved in the evaluation

4.4 Contribute to agreeing changes to activities or processes to improve outcomes for individuals













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 64: Undertake Agreed Pressure Area Care

Unit code:

HSC 2024

Unit reference number:

T/601/8721

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

4

Guided learning hours:

30



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at health and social care staff providing care to maintain healthy skin and prevent skin breakdown, by undertaking pressure area care in accordance with an individual’s care plan and risk assessment.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with the Skills for Care and Development’s QCF Assessment Principles.

Learning outcomes 3, 5 and 6 must be assessed in a real work environment.


^ Additional Information


Agreed ways of working includes policies and procedures where these exist.

Valid consent must be in line with agreed UK country definition

Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient.

Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 3, 5 and 6 are assessed in the workplace or in conditions resembling the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand the anatomy and physiology of the skin in relation to pressure area care



1.1 Describe the anatomy and physiology of the skin in relation to skin breakdown and the development of pressure sores

1.2 Identify pressure sites of the body

1.3 Identify factors which might put an individual at risk of skin breakdown and pressure sores

1.4 Describe how incorrect handling and moving techniques can damage the skin

1.5 Identify a range of interventions that can reduce the risk of skin breakdown and pressure sores

1.6 Describe changes to an individual’s skin condition that should be reported










2. Understand good practice in relation to own role when undertaking pressure area care



2.1 Identify legislation and national guidelines affecting pressure area care

2.2 Describe agreed ways of working relating to pressure area care

2.3 Describe why team working is important in relation to providing pressure area care










3. Be able to follow the agreed care plan



3.1 Describe why it is important to follow the agreed care plan

3.2 Ensure the agreed care plan has been checked prior to undertaking the pressure area care

3.3 Identify any concerns with the agreed care plan prior to undertaking the pressure area care

3.4 Describe actions to take where any concerns with the agreed care plan are noted

3.5 Identify the pressure area risk assessment tools which are used in own work area

3.6 Explain why it is important to use risk assessment tools











4. Understand the use of materials, equipment and resources are available when undertaking pressure area care


4.1 Identify a range of aids or equipment used to relieve pressure

4.2 Describe safe use of aids and equipment.

4.3 Identify where up-to-date information and support can be obtained about:

  • materials

  • equipment

  • resources










5. Be able to prepare to undertake pressure area care

    1. Prepare equipment and environment in accordance with health and safety guidelines

    2. Obtain valid consent for the pressure area care










6. Be able to undertake pressure area care



6.1 Carry out pressure area care procedure in a way that:

  • respects the individual’s dignity and privacy

  • maintains safety

  • ensures the individual’s comfort

  • promotes active participation

  • promotes partnership working

6.2 Apply standard precautions for infection prevention and control

6.3 Carry out the pressure area care procedure without obstruction from bedding and clothing

6.4 Move an individual using approved techniques and in accordance with the agreed care plan

6.5 Use pressure relieving aids in accordance with the care plan and any safety instructions

6.6 Communicate effectively with the individual throughout the intervention

6.7 Complete all records and documentation accurately and legibly














Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 65: Support Individuals Undergoing Healthcare Activities

Unit code:

HSC 2025

Unit reference number:

L/601/8725

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

3

Guided learning hours:

22



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings involved in supporting individuals during and after a healthcare activity.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles

Learning outcomes 2, 3 and 4 must be assessed in a real work environment.


Additional Information


Prepare and position includes assisting the individual to move into the required position.


Others may include:

  • the individual

  • family members

  • line manager

  • other health professionals

  • others who are important to the individual’s well-being.



Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3 and 4 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand healthcare activities in order to support individuals


1.1 Describe relevant anatomy and physiology in relation to the healthcare activity

1.2 Explain the purposes and use of medical equipment and devices required for the procedure

1.3 Explain the roles and responsibilities of team members

1.4 State protection/precautionary measures appropriate to the procedure being carried out

  • how they should be applied

  • the implications and consequences of not applying these measures

1.5 Explain how to manage the privacy and dignity of an individual in both conscious and unconscious states

1.6 Explain how to complete records of the actions taken and the individual's condition during the healthcare activity










2. Be able to prepare individuals to undergo healthcare activities.


2.1 Confirm the individual’s identity and gain valid consent

2.2 Describe any concerns and worries that an individual may have in relation to healthcare activities

2.3 Describe ways of responding to these concerns

2.4 Explain the procedure to the individual

2.5 Agree the support needed with the individual in a way that is sensitive to their personal beliefs and preferences

2.6 Refer any concerns or questions to others if unable to answer

2.7 Support an individual to prepare and position for the procedure ensuring that privacy and dignity is maintained at all times










3. Be able to support individuals undergoing healthcare activities.


3.1 Inform and reassure individuals

3.2 Apply standard precautions for infection prevention and control

3.3 Apply health and safety measures relevant to the healthcare activity and environment

3.4 Recognise any ill effects or adverse reactions

3.5 Take actions in response to any ill effects or adverse reactions

3.6 Ensure that an individual’s privacy and dignity is maintained at all times










4. Be able to support individuals following the healthcare activities.



4.1 Provide the individual with the facilities and support for the period of recovery

4.2 Monitor an individual and recognise signs of ill effects or adverse reactions

4.3 Take action in response to any ill effects or adverse reactions

4.4 Give individuals and relevant others instructions and advice where this is within own role

4.5 Confirm any requirements for transport and escorts

4.6 Maintain confidentiality of information in accordance with guidelines and procedure













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 66: Obtain and Test Capillary Blood Samples

Unit code:

HSC 2026

Unit reference number:

T/601/8850

QCF level:

3

Credit value:

4

Guided learning hours:

30



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at health and social care workers involved in the collection of capillary blood samples using either manual or automated lancets and testing of the sample where this is required


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.


Learning outcomes 3, 4, 5 and 6 must be assessed in a real work environment.


^ Additional Information


Valid consent must be in line with agreed UK country definition.

Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 3, 4, 5 and 6 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1 Understand how legislation, policy and good practice guidelines relate to obtaining and testing blood samples

1.1 Describe current legislation, national guidelines, local policies, protocols and good practice guidelines which relate to obtaining and testing capillary blood samples











2. Understand the anatomy and physiology in relation to obtaining and testing capillary blood samples

2.1 Describe the structure and purpose of capillary blood vessels

2.2 Explain blood clotting processes and the factors that influence blood clotting











3. Be able to prepare to obtain capillary blood samples

3.1 Confirm the individual’s identity and obtain valid consent

3.2 Select and prepare an appropriate site for obtaining the sample taking into account the individual’s preferences

3.3 Provide support and reassurance to address the individual’s needs and concerns

3.4 Communicate accurate information in a way that is sensitive to the individual’s personal beliefs and preferences











4. Be able to obtain capillary blood samples

4.1 Apply health and safety measures relevant to the procedure and environment

4.2 Apply standard precautions for infection prevention and control

4.3 Describe the different reasons for obtaining capillary blood samples

4.4 Obtain blood samples of the required volume and quantity causing minimal discomfort to the individual

4.5 Use the selected materials, equipment and containers/slides in accordance with agreed procedures correctly

4.6 Obtain blood samples in the correct sequence when obtaining multiple samples

4.7 Ensure stimulation of blood flow

4.8 Select alternative sites where necessary

4.9 Carry out the correct procedure for encouraging closure and blood clotting at the site

4.10 Respond to any indication of an adverse reaction, complication or problem during the procedure

4.11 Demonstrate correct labelling, packaging, transportation, storage and use of appropriate attached documentation in relation to blood samples to include:

  • Legibility of labelling and documentation

  • Temperature control of storage

  • Immediacy of transportation

4.12 Explain the actions to be taken if complications and problems occur during the collection of capillary blood samples, including contra-indications











5. Be able to test and record the results of blood samples

5.1 Test the sample, using the approved method in line with organisational procedure

5.2 Describe normal or expected results for particular tests

5.3 Recognise and interpret normal, expected and abnormal results

5.4 Ensure that results are passed on to an appropriate staff member for interpretation as required

5.5 Record results fully and accurately and forward according to local requirements











6. Be able to pass on the results of blood samples

6.1 Communicate the results of the tests and any further action required to the individual

6.2 Respond to questions and concerns from individuals providing accurate information

6.3 Refer issues outside own responsibility to an appropriate staff member













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 67: Obtain and Test Specimens from Individuals

Unit code:

HSC 2027

Unit reference number:

J/601/8853

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

2

Guided learning hours:

12



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in health care settings. This unit provides the learner with the knowledge and skills required to obtain and test specimens, excluding blood samples.


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.


Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 must be assessed in a real work environment.


^ Additional Information


Different types of specimens – excludes blood.


Valid consent must be in line with agreed UK country definition.


Agreed ways of working will include policies and procedures where these exist.

Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4 and 5 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand the processes involved in obtaining and testing specimens from individuals

1.1 Identify the different types of specimens that may be obtained

1.2 Describe the tests and investigations that may be carried out upon the specimens

1.3 Identify the correct equipment and materials used in the collection and transport of specimens










2. Be able to prepare to obtain specimens from individuals

2.1 Confirm the individual’s identity and obtain valid consent

2.2 Ensure the individual’s privacy and dignity is maintained at all times

2.3 Identify any aspects of the individual’s ethnic and religious background which might affect the procedure

2.4 Communicate with the individual in a medium appropriate to their needs and preferences

2.5 Demonstrate that the required preparations have been completed including materials and equipment










3. Be able to obtain specimens from individuals

3.1 Provide the correct container for the individual to be able to provide the specimen for themselves

3.2 Collect the specimen where the individual cannot provide the specimen for themselves

3.3 Describe possible problems in collecting specimens and how and when these should be reported

3.4 Demonstrate the correct collection, labelling and storage of specimens

3.5 Complete and attach relevant documentation










4. Be able to test specimens



4.1 Demonstrate the appropriate tests for a range of specimens obtained

4.2 Demonstrate appropriate health and safety measures relevant to the procedure and environment to include:

  • standard precautions for infection prevention and control

  • use of personal protective equipment










5. Be able to report on the outcomes on the test of specimens

5.1 Show the correct process for reporting and recording test results

5.2 Describe the actions to be taken when the results are outside the normal range

5.3 Communicate test results in accordance with agreed ways of working

5.4 Describe why it is important to understand the implications the test results may have on the individual










6. Understand relevant legislation, policy and good practice in relation to obtaining, carrying, testing and storing specimens

6.1 Explain current legislation, national guidelines, organisational policies and protocols which affect working practice

6.2 Identify the potential hazards and other consequences related to incorrect labelling of specimens













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 68: Move and Position Individuals in Accordance with their Plan of Care

Unit code:

HSC 2028

Unit reference number:

J/601/8027

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

4

Guided learning hours:

26



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