Scientific review of significant disease agents carried by non-viable, non-salmonid freshwater and estuarine finfish and their products icon

Scientific review of significant disease agents carried by non-viable, non-salmonid freshwater and estuarine finfish and their products


Similar
Czech Bioplatform review on research priorities in freshwater ecosystems...
Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents increase the risk of acute stroke in patients with chronic...
According to customary definitions...
~ 2 Agents, Multi-Agents Page(s)...
Review of Russian scientific activity in the frames of Russian Radiation Commission interests...
Tionhood of Indigenous Peoples. Bergen: Universitetsforlaget, pp. 329-339. Disease...
Manufacturing systems for 3D-shaped, multilayered products based on flexible materials...
I wanted to review something special for the launch of the Non Daily Dipper website...
Наукові форуми / научные форумы / scientific meetings наукова періодика / научная периодика /...
Harnessing natural carbon isotopes to understand organic matter transformations in estuarine...
The Things They Carried...
Agents, mechanisms, and other minds...



Загрузка...
страницы:   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
Scientific review of significant disease agents carried by non-viable, non-salmonid freshwater and estuarine finfish and their products.


B. L Munday


March 2002


Prepared for


Biosecurity Australia

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry - Australia


Scientific Review of Significant Disease Agents Carried by Non-viable,

Non-salmonid Freshwater and Estuarine Finfish and Their Products.


Terms of Reference


To document and analyse information reported in the scientific literature on disease agents and pests affecting or carried by freshwater finfish. The consultant should also analyse information on agents which do not produce significant pathogenic effects in freshwater fish, but which are known to cause significant pathogenic effects in their hosts.


Information in the report should be supported by scientific references. The following information should be provided for each pathogen:


  1. Name and taxonomy

  2. Epidemiological features

  • Geographic range and features of distribution (international spread)

  • Host range (including prevalence and incidence, resistant strains/species, lifestage susceptibility and course of infection, habitat (wild or cultured) and seasonality)

  • Morbidity/mortality rates

  • Transmission (including route and infectious dose)

  • Agent stability and inactivation data (chemical/thermal processes)




  1. Host impact

  • Tissue tropism

  • Brief description of major pathological and biological effects




  1. Diagnostics and disease control

  • Key diagnostic features

  • Overview of diagnostic methods, including sensitivity and specificity

  • Disease management activities in major producing countries


The study should follow the framework of the Import Risk Analysis on non-viable salmonids and non-salmonid marine finfish and will be used as a basis for the release, exposure, establishment and consequence assessments in the draft IRA.


The consultant may also be required to provide advice on other scientific and technical aspects of the risk analysis.


^ Table of Contents:


Introduction 5

Chapter 1. VIRAL DISEASES 7

1.1 VIRAL DISEASES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE FINFISH IN AUSTRALIA 7

1.2 SIGNIFICANT VIRAL DISEASES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE FINFISH NOT KNOWN TO OCCUR IN AUSTRALIA 7

1.2.1 GOLDEN SHINER VIRUS DISEASE 12

1.2.2 GRASS CARP HAEMORRHAGIC DISEASE 13

1.2.3 Birnavirus infection (non – eel virus European) 16

1.2.4 EEL Virus European 16

1.2.5 GILL LAMELLAR PILLAR CELL NECROSIS 17

1.2.6 INFECTIOUS PANCREATIC NECROSIS 19

1.2.7 MARBLED GOBY AQUABIRNAVIRUS DISEASE 25

1.2.8 COMMON CARP CORONAVIRUS INFECTION 26

1.2.9 ESOX LYMPHOSARCOMA 26

1.2.10 ESOX SARCOMA 27

1.2.11 WALLEYE DERMAL SARCOMA 28

1.2.12 GILL NECROSIS OF KOI 29

1.2.13 BREAM RHABDOVIRUS INFECTION 29

1.2.14 EEL RHABDOVIRUS 30

1.2.15PERCH/PIKE PERCH RHABDOVIRUS INFECTION 31

1.2.16PIKE FRY RHABDOVIRUS DISEASE 32

1.2.17 SNAKEHEAD RHABDOVIRUS 33

1.2.18 SPRING VIRAEMIA OF CARP 34

1.2.19 VIRAL HAEMORRHAGIC SEPTICAEMIA 38

1.2.20 ANGUILLID HERPESVIRUS INFECTION 47

1.2.21 MASS MORTALITY OF CARP 48

1.2.22CHANNEL CATFISH VIRUS DISEASE 49

1.2.23 CARP POX 56

1.2.24 HERPESVIRUS INFECTION OF BLACK CATFISH 58

1.2.25 TILAPIA LARVAE ENCEPHALITIS 59

1.2.26 HERPESVIRUS DISEASE OF JUVENILE WHITE STURGEON 59

1.2.27 HERPESVIRUS DISEASE OF JUVENILE/ADULT WHITE STURGEON 60

1.2.28 EUROPEAN CATFISH VIRUS 61

1.2.29 JAPANESE EEL IRIDOVIRUS INFECTION 62

1.2.30 LARGEMOUTH BASS IRIDOVIRUS DISEASE 63

1.2.31 MANDARINFISH IRIDOVIRUS 65

1.2.32 EUROPEAN SHEATFISH VIRUS 66

1.2.33 WHITE STURGEON IRIDOVIRUS INFECTION 67

1.2.34 VIRAL OEDEMA OF CARP 68

Chapter 2. Bacterial DISEASES 70

2.1 BACTERIAL DISEASES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE FINFISH IN AUSTRALIA 70

2.2 SIGNIFICANT BACTERIAL DISEASES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE FINFISH NOT KNOWN TO OCCUR IN AUSTRALIA 71

2.2.1 Aeromonas salmonicida infection 71

2.2.2 Photobacterium damselae piscicida (Pasteurellosis) 85

2.2.3 Vibrio vulnificus (Vibriosis) 89

2.2.4Edwardsiella ictaluri (Enteric septicaemia of catfish) 91

2.2.5 Pseudomonas anguilliseptica (Red-spot disease of eels). 105

Chapter 3. protozoan DISEASES 109

3.1 PROTOZOAN DISEASES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE FINFISH IN AUSTRALIA 109

3.2 SIGNIFICANT PROTOZOAN DISEASES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE FINFISH NOT KNOWN TO OCCUR IN AUSTRALIA 114

3.2.1 Trypanosoma carasii (Trypanosomiasis of carp) 115

3.2.2 Trypanoplasma borreli (Trypanoplasmosis of carp) 116

3.2.3 Goussia subepithelialis (Coccidiosis of carp) 117

3.2.4 Heterosporis anguillarum (Microsporidiosis of eels) 118

3.2.5 Dermocystidium cyprini INFECTION 119


List of tables:


Table 1:Species of non-viable freshwater and estuarine finfish currently imported into Australia for human consumption (not comprehensive) 6

Table 2:Viruses that are exotic to Australia that have been reported from freshwater and estuarine finfish 8

Table 3:Susceptible fish hosts of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus 38

Table 4:Bacteria that are exotic to Australia and reported from freshwater and estuarine fish 71

Table 5:Isolates of atypical A. salmonicida from farmed and wild fish species in different countries 73

Table 6:Mortality rates in wild fish species associated with atypical Aeromonas salmonicida. 75

Table 7:Isolation (Percentage of total number of fish examined) of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida from ulcerations and visceral organs of different fish species. 78

Table 8:Isolations of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida from estuarine fish. 85

Table 9:Species of fish from which Edwardsiella ictaluri has been isolated. 92

Table 10:Protozoan parasites reported from Australian freshwater and estuarine finfish. 109

Table 11:Significant exotic protozoan parasites of freshwater and estuarine finfish 115


Introduction




This review encompasses significant, exotic disease agents and pests of freshwater and estuarine finfish likely to be imported into Australia. “Significant” in this context indicates that the scientific literature suggests that the agent produces disease of concern and does not necessarily equate with significant diseases as defined in the Import Risk Analysis of Non-viable Salmonids and Non-salmonid Marine Finfish (AQIS 1999) or the review for the Scientific Working Party on Aquatic Animal Quarantine entitled Australian Quarantine Policies and Practices for Aquatic Animals and their Products, Humphrey (1995).


Where possible, emphasis will be placed on those finfish species which are at present imported (Table 1), but serious diseases of other freshwater/estuarine fish will also be included. As previously decided by AQIS (1999) metazoan parasites (it should be noted that myxozoa are now classified as metazoa, Siddall et al. 1995) will not be dealt with in detail. The following points were used to justify this decision:


  • This is a very large group of organisms and for many species/genera there is little information on distribution (including in Australia), host range and pathogenic significance. There are very few records of serious disease epizootics due to metazoan infestations in wild fish.




  • While there are some exceptions, it is generally the case that infestation with metazoan organisms, in the absence of additional stressors such as overcrowding, insanitary environmental conditions or intercurrent disease, is of minor significance to the vertebrate host.




  • Most of the metazoa are obligatory parasites that display varying degrees of host-specificity. Many (but not all) have life cycles that involve several host animals. Although some species have free-living stages, generally speaking parasites would not survive beyond about 48 hours in a dead host that has been removed from the aquatic environment. Moreover, freezing the product would rapidly kill any metazoan parasites that may be present (this is an important step in treating fish for consumption in raw form that may contain metazoan parasites of public health concern).




  • Many metazoan parasites are big enough to be seen on the fish and are removed during inspection of the product. Most of the metazoans that infest the internal organs and the gastrointestinal tract would be removed from the product at the time of evisceration.




  • In a personal communication to AQIS, B. Jones (1999) stated that many genera of metazoan parasites have been recorded in fish in Australian waters and in most cases these species have not been defined. There is a growing literature on the taxonomic relationships of the Australian aquatic parasite fauna with the parasite fauna of neighbouring regions. These studies show that the relationships are complex and often reflect the faunal groupings of the host animals and historical migration and movement patterns. There are no mandatory controls in Australia to address endemic diseases due to metazoan parasites.



^ Table 1:Species of non-viable freshwater and estuarine finfish currently imported into Australia for human consumption (not comprehensive)


^ Common name

Scientific Name

Barramundi

Lates calcarifer

Bronze featherback

^ Notopterus notopterus

Catfish

Pangasius bocourti

Catfish

^ Silurus anomalus

Climbing perch

Anabas testudineus

Gangetic mystus

^ Mystus cavasius

Giant gourami

Osphronemus goramy

Hairtail

^ Trichiurus haumela

Hoven’s carp

Leptobarbus hoevenii

Marbled goby

^ Oxyeleotris marmorata

Nile perch

Lates niloticus

Ompok fish

^ Kryptopterus apogon

Pond catfish

Clarias macrocephalus

Ribbonfish

^ Lepturacanthus savala

Sand goby

Pomatoschistus minutus

Sharp-headed catfish

^ Arius argyropleuron

Snakehead fish

Ophiocephalus striatus

Snakeskin gourami

^ Trichogaster pectoralis

Swamp eel

Fluta alba

Tilapia

^ Oreochromis mossambious

Tinfoil fish

Puntius altius

Whole Spiny Goby

^ Pseudapocryptes lanceolatus


References

AQIS (1999). Import Risk Analysis on Non-viable Salmonids and Non-salmonid Marine Finfish. AQIS, Canberra.


Humphrey, J.D. (1995). Australian Quarantine Policies and Practices for Aquatic Animals and their Products. A Review for the Scientific Working Party on Aquatic Animal Quarantine, Bureau of Resource Sciences, Canberra.


Siddall, M.E., Martin, D.S., Bridge, D., Desser, S.S. and Cone, D.K. (1995). The demise of a phylum of protists: phylogeny of myxozoa and other parasitic cnidaria. ^ J. Parasitol. 81: 961-967.






Download 0.54 Mb.
leave a comment
Page1/10
Date conversion13.10.2011
Size0.54 Mb.
TypeДокументы, Educational materials
Add document to your blog or website

страницы:   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
Be the first user to rate this..
Your rate:
Place this button on your site:
docs.exdat.com

The database is protected by copyright ©exdat 2000-2017
При копировании материала укажите ссылку
send message
Documents

upload
Documents

Рейтинг@Mail.ru
наверх