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Academic Program Review


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Los Angeles Harbor College


Program Review

for


MATHEMATICS


Following the guidelines as approved by the Academic Senate,

the College Planning Committee on October 16, 2003 and

using the Steps as approved by the Academic Senate and the

Academic Affairs Cluster






Academic Program Review



Name of discipline: Mathematics

Division chair: L. J. McKenzie Phone number: 310-233-4501

Names and type(s) of program(s): Mathematics

 Complete description of Mathematics AA degree requirements on page 8

 Certificates program: None

 Skills certificates: None

 Complete list of discipline course offerings on pages 9-12

 Complete course outline for Math 265 is listed on pages 13 – 21. Additional course outlines accepted by the Curriculum Committee can be found at http://www.lahc.edu/curriculum/index.html



 Current sample class syllabi for courses Math 121 and 275 are listed on pages 22- 25


 Current Unit Plan is listed on page 26

  • ^ Brief overview of the program. Align the program with the college goals and strategies.


The Mathematics Department offers courses that meet AA degree, occupational and

transfer programs requisites such as allied health, engineering, pre-med and physical sciences. Courses offered in this department vary from developmental/remedial to college sophomore level. The department supports special students' populations by closely working with college support services such as Counseling, Financial Aid and Special Services Programs.

Mathematics is an integral part of many college programs that include at least one requisite course in this subject, and half of the competency requirement for the AA degree.

The Mathematics Department meets the academic goal and strategies of the College by

offering a flexible schedule of courses that accommodates morning, evening and

Saturday student populations. Scheduling of courses is based on student demand and

course rotations that allow students to complete their transfer requirements in a

reasonable amount of time.


Number of full-time faculty FTEF BY SEMESTER since last review or previous three years: 9.0 FTE


Number of adjunct FTEF BY SEMESTER since last review or previous three years: 11.0 FTE


Number of FTEF taught as overload by full-time faculty: 1.2 FTE


Total FTEF BY SEMESTER since last review: 21.2 FTE

  • Document changes in support personnel, classifications, and budget since last

review or the previous three years:


The last personnel change in the department took place in the year 2000 with the addition of a voluntary faculty transfer from another college within the district. One faculty retirement in 2002 was not replaced due to college budget constraints.


Budget for equipment is 100% dependent on state block grant allocations,

budget for supplies is100% dependent on College Swap meet revenues.



  • ^ Number of sections offered including sections canceled, not listed in the class

schedule for Spring 2004, or combined:


GE credit courses: 15

Major required courses: 3

Elective courses: 0

Total sections: 18

Total WSCH: 727

GE courses: 3

Major required courses: N/A

Elective courses: N/A

Total WSCH: 727

Total WSCH to FTEF: 352

  • ^ List WSCH to FTEF for the past three years BY SEMESTER:

For past three years: 362, 471, 727

Degrees awarded: 0

Certificates awarded: N/A

Skills certificates awarded: N/A

  • Retention rate:

GE courses:

Major required courses: N/A

Elective courses: N/A

Overall retention rate: 63%, 68%, 72%, 73%, 76 %( fall 1999 to 2003)

  • Successful completion:

GE courses:

Major required courses: N/A

Elective courses: N/A

Overall successful completion rate: 46%, 49%, 51%, 49%, 51 %( fall 1999 to 2003)

  • ^ What areas of the program need strengthening?

Faculty Recruitment: the department must develop an aggressive recruitment strategy to hire adjunct faculty. Due to Harbor’s proximity to at least five other community colleges, the department faces heavy competition when staffing adjunct assignments.


^ Instructional Assistance: additional math instructional staffing for the math lab to provide better service to students enrolled during evening hours and weekends.


Student Recruitment: in order to increase enrollment in the advanced level mathematics courses, the department would like to attract a larger number of achieving students interested in pursuing computer science, engineering, mathematics and science careers.


^ Facilities and resources:

A long term goal for the department is to find a building to call its own. Since the

college inception, the department has shared space with other disciplines.

The department is slated to share a new building with the Communications, Social Science

and Pace divisions in the near future.

Student Placement: to ensure greater success in the math sequence of courses offered, the department must undertake a cyclical review of the testing instrument and cut off scores used to place students in math courses. After extensive review and discussion, the math department faculty opted to replace the present COMPASS placement instrument with ASSET.


  • ^ What are the strengths of the program?

Curriculum: Courses have been designed to fully prepare students to meet math competency requirements for the AA degree, math requirements for courses offered at the college, and CSU/UC transfer requirements.


Instructional Assistance: the department operates an instructional math lab to supplement math instruction for students enrolled at the college. The math lab operates Monday through Saturday employing one instructional assistant and several peer tutors.


Students: Under the leadership of M. Jimenez, students enrolled in Math 215 and 216 participate in service learning projects assisting local grade school teachers in the classroom.


Partnerships: Together with Chemistry and Physics Departments on campus, the Math Department is an active participant of the Loyola Marymount Summer Research Program, CSUDH teacher prep program, UC Bridge Program and Jet Propulsion Laboratories Undergraduate Scholarship Program.


  • ^ Summarize program and unit plan modifications necessary for program improvement.


Department faculty visited the Campus Placement Center to get a first hand look at the math placement process. Recommendations to improve the placement of students into Math courses have been forwarded to the Matriculation Committee.


Department faculty undertook a major textbook search for the Math 123A,B,C sequence during the spring 2005 term.


  • For programs requiring advisory committees, attach minutes from the last three meetings.

N/A


  • What sources of data outside the college data set (if any) were taken into consideration in this part of the program review?

None


  • From what was determined from the review, what trends are indicated by the data?

Pursuing the philosophy that the study of mathematics is an integral part of the student’s preparation in all aspects of academic development, during the fall of 2000 the department collapsed the course offerings of Math 113, 114, 115, 125, 125A and 125B, with academic units varying from 2.5 to 5, into a cohesive three course of Math 123A, B and C sequence with equal academic units. The purpose of this modification was two fold: firstly to bring about order to a rather erratic course sequence with multiple paths and secondly to increase the retention rate in the entry level algebra sequence. Fall 2000 to 2004 data shows a modest increase in the retention rate for students undertaking the elementary and intermediate algebra sequence.


Support Documentation


Program: Mathematics

Division: Math-Physical Sciences


Beginning date of self-study Completion date of self-study

Fall 2004 Fall 2005


Self-study committee members: M. Gagrat, C. Huff, M. Jimenez, K. Keller, F. Ma,

L. McKenzie, J. Pavlina, Z. Romero, F. Saddigh


Division chair: L. J. McKenzie


Program faculty: M. Gagrat, C. Huff, M. Jimenez, K. Keller, F. Ma, L. McKenzie,

J. Pavlina, Z. Romero, F. Saddigh


Program staff: A. Vega - Secretary, N. Muro - Math Inst. Assistant


Program administrator: N. Carson


Vice-president of cluster: Luis M. Rosas


Professional or alumni: TBA


Students:

The department shares student enrollment patterns experienced nationwide. Enrollment is

strong and parallels nationwide trends.


^ Mission, goals, and objectives and purpose of the program:

The mission of the department is to provide students with a foundation of contemporary mathematics skills and competencies needed to satisfy a variety of degree and careers goals. Recognizing the diverse background of students, this foundation includes basic skills, transfer level and specialized courses that aim to contribute to workforce development and improvement. In all aspects of its mission, the department’s goal is to provide a supportive learning environment that imparts student success in analyzing, quantifying and developing critical thinking skills. The curriculum focuses on recognizing the interdependence between theory and application, enhancing it with the appropriate use of classroom technology.


  • Upon successful completion of mathematics courses, students will have a foundation in contemporary mathematics skills and competencies needed to satisfy a variety of degree and careers goals




  • Upon successful completion of Math 123A and B with a grade of “C” or better, students will be able to meet the mathematics competency level for the AA degree




  • Upon successful completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better, students will be able to satisfy the minimum pre-requisite for math and science transfer courses




  • Upon successful completion(a grade of “C” or better) of Math courses at least one level above Math 123C, students will be able to meet minimum mathematics transfer requirements


Describe any unique institutional goals the program satisfies:

  • ^ For each degree and certificate offered by the program, complete the following:

Number of major students: Unknown

Numbers of sections, by year over five years: 63, 72, 64, 76, 59 (Fall 1999 to 2003)

Number of students, by year over five years: 2330, 2257, 2029, 2583, 2393 (Fall 1999 to 2003)

Number of full-time faculty: (immediate past year) 10

Number of adjunct faculty: (immediate past year) 0

Total full-time equivalent faculty: (immediate past year) 10.0

Ratio of students to FTEF: (immediate past year)

Full-time equivalent students (FTES): 289, 282, 289, 340, 316 (Fall 1999 to 2003)

Number of permanent staff: (immediate past year) 2

Number of full-time equivalent staff: (immediate past year) 2.0

Number of full-time equivalent personnel: (immediate past year) 12.0

Gender breakdown of students: (immediate past year) Not relevant to this program

Ethnic breakdown of student: (immediate past year) Not relevant to this program


MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE - Major Code: 1701.01

Plan A

A.S. Degree Program Requirements

UNIT REQUIREMENTS: A minimum of 60 semester units of course credit in a selected curriculum which includes at least 30 semester units of general education coursework as specified in the College Catalog (GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS- GRADUATION PLAN A) and at least 18 semester units of study taken in a single discipline or related disciplines as indicated below (MAJOR REQUIREMENT). See course description for prerequisites since these will be strictly enforced.

When planning their program of study, students should see a counselor.

^ MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Completion of each of the following courses with a grade of "C" or better:

Units

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II ........................................ 5

PHYS 38 Elect. Magnet. Optics ...................................... 5

MATH 165, 170, 175

Computer Programming ................................... 3

and

MATH 270 Linear Algebra .................................................. 3

or

MATH 275 Diff. Equations .................................................. 3

ENGLISH 101 College Reading and Composition I .............. 3

^ Below is a departmentally recommended sample program which groups required major courses into four semesters. Students must also complete 30 units of General Education requirements from Graduation Plan A.

Degree and Certificate Programs * 69 2004-2006 General Catalog

Sample Program

^ FIRST SEMESTER Units

+CHEM 101 General Chemistry I ......................................... 5

+ENGL 101 Reading and Composition I .............................. 3

+MATH 265 Calculus I ......................................................... 5

MATH 155 Introduction to Visual Basic .............................. 3

^ SECOND SEMESTER

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II ....................................... . 5

MATH 266 Calculus II ......................................................... 5

PHYS 37 Mechanics Solids, Sound ................................. 5

THIRD SEMESTER

MATH 267 Calculus III ....................................................... .5

MATH 270 Linear Algebra ................................................. .3

MATH 165, 170, 175

Computer Programming ................................... 3

PHYS 38 Elect. Magnet. Optics ....................................... 5

^ FOURTH SEMESTER

MATH 275 Diff. Equations .................................................. 3

MATH 165, 170, 175

Computer Programming ................................... 3

Additional G.E. Requirements ......................... 21

Total Units for this A.S. Degree .................... 74

+ This course may count towards General Education Requirements

^ COURSES OFFERED


MATH 100 - MATHEMATICS WORKSHOP (1) RPT 3

NDA

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in a mathematics or mathematics

related course.

Laboratory 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course supplements all mathematics level courses by providing tutorial

and self-help assistance. Offered on a credit/no credit basis only.


^ MATH 105 - ARITHMETIC FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS (3)

NDA

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course explores arithmetic concepts from a modern point of view. It includes discussion of pre-algebra topics, applications of arithmetic in business and finance, and geometry.


^ MATH 112 - PRE-ALGEBRA (3) NDA

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course presents a review of arithmetic topics and an introduction to elementary algebraic topics including signed numbers, exponents, mathematical sentences, and linear equations.


^ MATH 115 - ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA (5)

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

This course gives a rapid review of basic arithmetic with gradual introduction to the concepts of algebra, including signed numbers, exponents, polynomials, equations, graphs, systems of equations, inequalities, and quadratic equations. It contains applications of algebra to a wide variety of problems related to business and other sciences. This course is equivalent to Math 123 A and B.


^ MATH 121 - ESSENTIALS OF PLANE GEOMETRY (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 123A & B or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course covers the definitions, axioms and theorems of geometry relating to angles, lines, circles, polygons and polyhedra. The meaning and techniques of logical proof are emphasized.


^ MATH 123 - ELEMENTARY AND INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA(12)

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 112 with a grade of “C” or better, or placement by exam.

Lecture 4 hours and 25 minutes per week for each module A, B and C.

This course provides a combined study of elementary and intermediate algebra topics, fulfilling any intermediate algebra requisite. Topics covered include exponents, radicals, solutions of equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, determinants, logarithms, sequences and series.

Course is offered in a three modules Math 123A, B, C 4 units each.


^ MATH 125 - INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (5)

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Mathematics 115 or equivalent.

Also equivalent to Math 123C.

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

This course provides a study of the fundamental laws of algebra, exponents and radicals, solution of equations (linear, quadratic and some of higher degree), solution of systems of equations (linear and quadratic) graphic representation, functions, logarithms, determinants, binomial theorem and arithmetic and geometric sequences and series.


^ MATH 150 - INTRODUCTION TO FORTRAN (3) UC:CSU

Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in Mathematics 155 or knowledge of BASIC programming; and Mathematics 123C, or equivalent.

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

Students are trained to use FORTRAN 77. Applications to science, business, engineering, and social studies are discussed. The intent of the course is to give students sufficient skill in using the computer to enable them to solve problems in their respective fields of study.


^ MATH 155 - INTRODUCTION TO BASIC (3) CSU

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Mathematics 123C or equivalent.

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

Introduction to problem solving methods and programming with VISUAL BASIC. Course covers the fundamentals of event-driven, project oriented programming.


^ MATH 160 - COMPUTER LABORATORY (1) CSU - RPT 3

Co-requisite: enrollment in a Mathematics Computer Programming course.

Laboratory 2 hours and 10 minutes per week.

This course is designed to facilitate and enhance the use of the Computer Center for students enrolled in mathematics computer programming courses. This course may be repeated three times.


^ MATH 175 – MATHEMATICAL ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER

PROGRAMMING (3) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Mathematics 123C or equivalent.

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

Introduction to object-oriented programming in C++. This course covers the fundamentals of control structures, I/O operations, classes and data abstractions, inheritance, polymorphism, file processing and overloading.


^ MATH 215 - PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS I (3) UC:CSU

Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

First of two courses in a sequence designed for elementary school teachers. Emphasis is on the pedagogy of sets and relations, numeration systems, basic problem solving, elementary number theory and their applications.


^ MATH 216 - PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS II (3)

UC:CSU

Completion of Math 215 with a grade of “C” or better

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

Second of two courses in a sequence designed for elementary school teachers. Emphasis is on the pedagogy of probability, statistics networks, basic geometry concepts and their applications.


^ MAT 227 - STATISTICS (4) UC:CSU

Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

Lecture 4 hours and 25 minutes per week.

This course is an introduction to probability, descriptive and inferential statistics including measures of central tendency and dispersion, sampling and estimation. Hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, tests of independence, linear correlation and regression analysis are also covered.


^ MATH 230 - MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS STUDENTS (3) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Mathematics 123C or equivalent.

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course surveys selected topics in modern algebra including voting methods, apportionment, mathematics of finance, number theory, probability, statistics and graph theory. (CAN MATH 2)


^ MATH 235 - FINITE MATHEMATICS (5) UC:CSU

Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

The objective of this course is to expose students to various mathematical techniques required in solving business and social science related problems. The topics cover a brief survey of basic algebra, together with the theory of matrices, simplex method, and their applications in linear programming. In addition, the course also covers mathematics of finance, probability theory with applications to statistics, the binomial and normal distributions.


^ MATH 236 - CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL

SCIENCE (5) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 245 with a grade of “C” or better.

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

This course consists of basic concepts of differential and integral calculus in single variables with applications for business, life and social sciences. Topics include limits, derivatives, maxima and applications, integration techniques with applications, and graphs. (CAN MATH 34)


^ MATH 240 - TRIGONOMETRY (3) CSU

Prerequisites: Completion of Math 121 and 123C with a grade of “C”

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course provides a study of the circular functions and equations, as well as formulas related to angles and the solution of triangles and their applications to other sciences. (CAN MATH 8)


^ MATH 245 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This course is designed for students who are looking for a transferable course that satisfies the college algebra requirements, as well as for students who wish to pursue Math 235, 236 sequence


^ MATH260 - PRE-CALCULUS (5) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Mathematics 123C or equivalent.

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

Topics in college algebra such as induction, the binomial theorem, theory of equations, arithmetic and geometric series, determinants and matrices. Function analysis and analytic geometry topics also covered. (CAN MATH 16)


^ MATH 265 - CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I (5)UC:CSU

Prerequisites: Completion of Math 240 and 260 with a grade of “C” or better. Business majors are urged to take Mathematics 235 and 236 instead of Mathematics 260 and 265 unless they plan to take additional calculus courses.

^ Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

This is the first in a sequence of three courses in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals of rational and trigonometric functions. Applications include topics in engineering and physics. (CAN MATH 18)


^ MATH 266 - CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II (5) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 265 with a grade of “C” or better.

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

This course includes applications of integrals to work and pressure, exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Additional topics include integration techniques, improper integrals, L’Hopital’s Rule, infinite series and analytic geometry of conic sections.

(CAN MATH 20; MATH 265+266 = CAN MATH SEQ B)


^ MATH 267 - CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III (5) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 266 with a grade of “C” or better.

Lecture 5 hours and 30 minutes per week.

This course includes polar spherical and cylindrical coordinates; parametric equations, vector algebra and calculus in two and three dimensions; partial derivatives; multiple integrals and applications. (CAN MATH 22)


^ MATH 270 - LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) UC:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 266 with a grade of “C” or better. Recommended co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in Math 267.

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

Matrix algebra, vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices are included in this course. There is emphasis on theory and applications. (CAN MATH 26)


275 - ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) UC:CSU

^ Prerequisite: Completion of Math 267 with a grade of “C” or better or concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 267.

Lecture 3 hours and 20 minutes per week.

This is a course in differential equations with emphasis on applications in physical science. Traditional methods of solution by closed forms are studied together with series solutions and numerical methods of solution. La Place transforms are also included. (CAN MATH 24)


^ MATH 185 - DIRECTED STUDY-MATH (1) UC*:CSU RPT 2

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

or equivalent.

* UC credit may be granted by petition after transfer.


MATH 285 - DIRECTED STUDY-MATH (2) UC*:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

* UC credit may be granted by petition after transfer.


^ MATH 385 - DIRECTED STUDY-MATH (3) UC*:CSU

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 123C with a grade of “C” or better

Conference 1 hour and 5 minutes per week per unit.

Allows student to pursue directed study in Math on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

* UC credit may be granted by petition after transfer.

Credit limit: A maximum of 3 units in Directed Study is allowed for any combination of Math 185, 28 5 and 385.


^ COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE EDUCATION

Mathematics is approved for Cooperative Work Experience Education credit. See Cooperative Education courses for prerequisites, course descriptions, and credit limits.

LOS ANGELES HARBOR COLLEGE COURSE OUTLINE


 Associate Degree Applicable Course TOP CODE: 1701.00


 Non Associate Degree Applicable Course  NEW Course

 ADDITION of a District Course

 Revision/Update Date: 05/06/05

 Distributive Learning

 Curr. Comm. Date: 05/21/05


1. DEPARTMENT/DISCIPLINE: Mathematics


2. SUBJECT: Mathematics SUBJECT CODE: 589


3. COURSE TITLE: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I COURSE NUMBER/LETTER: 265


4. HOURS PER WEEK: Lecture 5 hrs. Lab 0 hrs. Discussion hrs


Other: (Specify)       total hrs/wk 5 UNITS: 5


5. REPEATABILITY: None RPT1 RPT2 RPT3


6. PREREQUISITE AND/OR CO-REQUISITE: Completion of Math 240 and Math 260 with a grade of "C" or better


7. COURSE CATALOG DESCRIPTION: (Please limit to 50 words)


This is the first course in a sequence of three courses in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include functions,

limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals of rational and trigonometric functions. Applications include topics in

engineering and physics.


^ 8. COURSE CLASSIFICATION / ARTICULATION:

Course Articulation

Classification Requested: Approved/Date/Signature:

Acceptable for Credit, University of California  
Acceptable for Credit, California State Universities  
Baccalaureate  

 Occupational  
 Pre-college level, prerequisite and/or Developmental


9. TEXTBOOKS: (List all publications that students are required to use, plus any recommended college level readings) (Also required for courses offered in a Distributive Learning format in order to be transferable.)

Author: Anton/Bivens/Davis Title: Calculus


Publisher: Wiley Edition: Seventh


Author: Title:


Publisher Edition:




Other Readings:


10. MATERIALS & SUPPLIES: (List materials and supplies that are REQUIRED for this course. For Distributive Learning courses: Students are required to have a personal E-mail address & Internet access through a private provider.)


^ COLLEGE PROVIDED:      


STUDENT PROVIDED: Text book and hand held scientific calculator

 Not Applicable


11. COURSE ENTRY SKILLS, OBJECTIVES / EXIT SKILLS:


A. ENTRY SKILLS: [Minimum of Five (5)] State performance skills and behaviors in specific and measurable terms.^ THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO:


(1) Solve linear and non linear equations and inequalities


(2) Plot and interpret graphs of equations


(3) Translate verbally stated problems into appropriate mathematical forms


(4) Solve absolute value equations and inequalities


(5) Solve equations of degree two and higher and those involving trigonometric functions


(6) Graph basic polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and apply them in applications


(7) Use trigonometric functions and identities to solve problems


(8) Sketch graphs in polar and parametric co-ordinate systems




^ B. OBJECTIVES / EXIT SKILLS: [Minimum of five (5)] State performance behaviors and skills in specific and measurable terms. These skills become the entry skills for the next course. As a result of completing this course, THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:


(1) State and apply mathematical definitions and theorems


(2) Find limits, derivatives and anti derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions


(3) Analyze and discuss the interrelation of various branches of mathematics and science


(4) Formulate sophisticated methods of problem solving and critical thinking using calculus



(5) Develop techniques for applying calculus to the solution of problems arising in science and engineering


(6) Use differentiation to graph and optimize function values


(7) Apply theory of definite integrals to solve geometric, scientific and engineering problems



12. ^ SCANS Competencies

 Time  Money  Material and Facilities  Human Resources


Information (Acquires and uses information.)

 Acquires/Evaluates  Organizes/Maintains  Interprets/Communicates  Uses Computers


Technology (Works with a variety of technologies.)

 Selects  Applies to tasks  Maintains and troubleshoots equipment


Thinking Skills

 Creative Thinking  Decision Making  Problem Solving  Symbolic Thinking

 Application of learning techniques  Reasoning


Interpersonal (Works with others.)

 Serves as team member  Teaches others  Serves clients/customers

 Exercises Leadership  Negotiates  Works with diversity


Systems (Understands complex inter-relationships.)

 Understands systems  Monitors/corrects systems  Improves/designs systems


Fundamentals

 Reading  Writing  Mathematics  Listening  Speaking


Personal Qualities

 Responsibility  Self Esteem  Sociability  Self Management  Integrity


^ 13. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY:

A. WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS

Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Essay(s)   Journals

  Term Paper(s)   Homework

  Report(s)   E-mail/Bulletin Boards

  Summaries & Analyses   Internet/Chat Rooms

^ B. SYMBOL SYSTEMS

Req. Opt. Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Logic   Computation   Art Projects

  Music   Interpretations   Drafting/Graphics

  Proofs   Applications   Other (Drawing & geo. const.)


C. SKILLS

Req. Opt. Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Verbal   Analytical   Laboratory

  Written   Physical   Computer

  Other (     )

^ 14. APPROPRIATE OUTSIDE ASSIGNMENTS

Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Field Trips   Readings

  Lectures   Research Projects

  Meetings   Computer Projects

  Skill Practice   Library Work

  Special Films and TV Programs   Other(     )


^ 15. CRITICAL THINKING ASSIGNMENTS

Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Problem Solving   Translation

  Class Research   Syntheses

  Analyses   Interpretations

  Comparing and Contrasting   Comprehension of Subject Matter

  Evaluating Significance   Creating/Formulating Ideas

  Setting Up Proofs   Other (     )


^ 16. INSTRUCTIONAL MODES

Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Lecture   Term Project

  Lecture/Discussion   Oral Drills

  Lecture/Laboratory   Work Experience

  Laboratory   Computer Interactive Assignments

  Demonstration   Guided Discussion

  Written Assignments   Discussion/Seminar

  Reading Assignments   Independent/Directed Study

  Mediated TV   One-on-one Conference

  TV/Audio Visual   Digitized/Modem

  Guest Speakers   ISDN/CODEC (Videoconference)

  Small Group Experience   Internet Access

  Field Experience   E-mail Address

  Other (     )   Other (     )

^ 17. COURSE CONTENT(MATH 265)

(Please outline by topics or activities and include time schedule or week)
(Distributive-Learning courses: Allocation of time may [or may not] be consistent with traditional course hours/weeks. It will vary from student to student. See approved course outlines for examples.)



Time Allocated

Topic or Activity

3 hours






Review of algebraic, trigonometric and parametric functions



28 hours


Limits and continuity of algebraic and trigonometric functions

Differentiation techniques and formulae, Chain Rule, Implicit differentiation,

tangent lines and slopes

Related rates problems and linear approximations using differentials



17 hours


Applications of the derivative in graphing and rectilinear motion problems

Local and absolute extrema of functions

Rolle's and Mean Value Theorems



18 hours


Integration, the indefinite integral; areas by integration, definite integrals; the summation notation; area as the limit of a sum; applications of integration; integration by substitution

Fundamental Theorem of Calculus



18 hrs
Applications of definite integrals: areas, volumes, lengths of plane curves, areas of surfaces of revolution, work and fluid force


6 hours
Exams





Note: The Carnegie Rule and Title 5 section 55002 sets forth the minimum standards which require:

1 hour lecture with 2 hours homework = ^ 1 unit Lecture also includes discussion and/or demonstration

2 hours of lab with homework = 1 unit 3 hours of lab without homework = 1 unit.

laboratory includes activity and/or studio hours.

State number of hours (90) for activities if scheduled in less than one semester.


Use additional pages if necessary.

^ 18. EVALUATION METHODS

(Multiple measures, which are consistent with the course objectives, content and scope, must be used to determine student’s final grade. Student performance will be evaluated by essay unless problem solving or skill demonstration is more appropriate.)

Req. Opt. Req. Opt.

  Quizzes, Unit Tests, Midterms   Essays

  Final Exam   Term Papers, Projects and Reports

  Laboratory Reports   Homework Assignments

  Observation Record of Student   Oral Presentations

Performance   Questionnaires

  Class Participation   Standardized Tests

  Written Compositions   Other (     )


^ 19. COLLEGE LIBRARY MATERIALS ASSESSMENT:


The instructor and acquisitions librarian have evaluated the library materials relating to this course and noted relevant supporting materials and needs.


Acquisitions Librarian __________________________________________ Date ________________________


The above signature does not denote approval or disapproval of this course. Signature is not required for routine course revisions, which do not have substantive changes.


^ 20. DISTRIBUTIVE LEARNING COURSES: COLLEGE READINESS


The instructor has consulted with the LAN Administrator and Distance Education Coordinator regarding needed support related to this course. This support may include use of college facilities, assistance in preparation of materials to be sent over the ISDN lines in digitized format, and provision for intellectual property rights of the instructor.

LAN Administrator ____________________________________________ Date ________________________


Distance Education Coordinator __________________________________ Date ________________________


The above signatures do not denote approval or disapproval of this course. Signatures are not required for routine course revisions that do not have substantive changes.


______________________________________________ ______________________________________________

Prepared by Date Division Chair Date


_______________________________________________ _____________________________________________

Curriculum Committee Chair Date Vice President of Academic Affairs Date

^ LOS ANGELES HARBOR COLLEGE

STANDARDS AND CRITERIA FOR APPROVAL OF CREDIT COURSES


Name of Course: Math 265 - Calculus

Using the Official Course Outline, please determine whether or not the above listed credit course meets the following standards and criteria required in Title 5, Part VI of the California Administrative Code, and which has been designated as appropriate to the Associate Degree. Place a mark (X) in the appropriate box. For courses applicable for an Associate Degree all criteria must be met. For courses NOT applicable for an Associate Degree only criteria marked with an (*) must be met.




RATING
CRITERION





MET

NOT

MET


* 1. Is recommended by the responsible college officials, and the academic senate or other appropriate faculty body as meeting the requirements of this subsection and has been approved by the local district governing board as a course meeting the needs of the students eligible for admission.










* 2. Is taught by a credentialed instructor in the discipline









* 3. Is offered as described in an outline in official college files. That outline shall specify the unit value, scope, objectives, content in terms of a specified body of knowledge, appropriate reading and writing assignments, outside of class assignments, instructional methodology, and methods of evaluation for determining whether the stated objectives have been met by students.








* 4. Is taught in accordance with a set of instructional objectives common to all students.









* 5a. Provides for measurement of student performance in terms of the stated course objectives and culminates in a formal recorded grade based upon uniform standards in accordance with Section 55758 of this part, which is permanently recorded as an evaluation of student performance.










5b. Bases grades on demonstrated proficiency in subject matter determined by multiple measurements for evaluation; and has examinations, including essays and/or, where appropriate, uses appropriate symbol systems and/or skills demonstrations by students.










* 6a. Grants units of credit based upon a specified relationship between the number of units assigned to the course and the number of lecture and/or laboratory hours or performance criteria specified in the course outline.










6b. Requires a minimum of three hours of work per week including class time for each unit of credit and prorated for short term, lab and activity courses.














RATING
CRITERION





MET

NOT

MET



7. Treats subject matter with the scope and intensity, which requires students to study independently outside of class time.








* 8. Requires, when appropriate, entrance skills and consequent prerequisites for the course before students are enrolled









9. Requires as a pre- or co-requisite to enrollment in other courses throughout the degree and certificate curricula, eligibility for enrollment in associate degree credit courses in English and/or mathematics when language and/or computational skills at the associate degree level are deemed by the college and/or district curriculum committee as necessary for success in such courses.










10. Requires the ability to think critically and to understand and apply concepts in order to participate in the course.








11. Requires learning skills and vocabulary appropriate for a college course.









12. Requires the use of college level educational materials.









* 13. Allows repeated enrollment only as permitted by provisions of Division 2 (commencing with Section 51000). Section 55781-55783 and 58161 of this part.








^ PLEASE INDICATE THE DEPARTMENT’S PLAN FOR IMPROVING ANY STANDARD NOT PRESENTLY MET.


     



^ COURSE NOT APPROVED FOR THE FOLLOWING REASON (S):


     


___________________________________________________ DATE ________________________

Curriculum Committee Chairperson




Fall 2005, Thursdays 6:55-10:05, LAC 113A




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