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SOCI 3333: SOCIOLOGY OF POPULAR MUSIC SPRING 2008 Seat#:_____

PROFESSOR: Sharon Miley E-mail: SM09@txstate.edu

OFFICE: DERR M21 Phone: 512-245-8905

HOURS: 3:30-4:30 M; 11-12 TTH; 8:30-9:30 W. Office hours end with the last class.

GRADUATE ASSISTANT: Frank Carrejo

SYLLABUS


COURSE DESCRIPTION, GOALS and OBJECTIVES: The Department of Sociology is committed to providing intellectually challenging courses requiring high quality work (in and out of class) in optimal learning environments. Sociology 3333 The Sociology of Popular Music is such a course—as challenging, as it is exciting, filled with “news you can use,” and providing students with unique and in-depth views of American society and culture.

  • We will explore the dynamic and interactive relationships between American popular music, our culture (how we live our lives), and the “happenings” of society for the past century.

  • We will analyze thoughtfully and critically American popular music--from ragtime, gospel, blues, jazz, country and swing to rock, disco, punk, rap, and alternative--as reflections of culture, as “voices” of society, and as powerful instruments of socialization, social stability, and social change.

  • Students successfully completing the course will develop an understanding and appreciation of sociological principles, concepts and theories (a “sociological imagination”) using a medium that impacts their everyday lives and world.


Reoccurring themes in American popular music will be related to American society and culture during the past century: *love and relationships *sex *gender roles *protest and war *racial and diversity issue *religion *status and prestige issues *alienation vs. cohesion *work *school *recreation *deviance *crime


Please note that there are no prerequisites for this course, and it is appropriate for all classification of students. The Sociology of Popular Music course counts as upper-level elective credit for non-sociology majors, sociology credit for majors and minors, and the course also counts toward the (interdisciplinary) Studies in Popular Culture minor housed in the Department of Sociology.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES include the following:

  • What was going on in American society at the time of the song?

  • What was the prevailing attitude/climate/environment of the time? What were the beliefs, ideas, values, and goals (our non-material culture) of the time?

  • What was everyday American life like (including our “material culture” - the “tangibles” like housing, technologies, fads, fashions, accomplishments, etc.)?

  • How was society structured at the time? How did it operate? What was going on in government, within the family and social relationships, in our economy, in our religious institutions, and in our educational systems?

  • What were the cohesive forces in society promoting stability, and how did American popular music play a part? (Functionalist theory)

  • What were the forces and sources of conflict in society leading to disharmony and/or social change? How did popular music play a part? (Conflict theory)

  • How has American popular music (either intentionally or unintentionally) been an agent of socialization for folks over the past century? How has it impacted who and what we are and become, as individuals and as members of a society?


^ REQUIRED CLASSROOM MATERIALS: The REQUIRED materials for SOCI 3333 The Sociology of Popular Music class are: (1) A coursepak of selected information ($12.05 rather than > $100 for the entire text), available at the Texas State University Bookstore AND (2) song lyrics and supplemental information available online (eReserve). Students will need to obtain the coursepak and Unit I materials (online) prior to the second day of class. Your professor will announce in class the password and when the materials for Units II and III will be available.


^ ERESERVE SONG LYRICS ARE DIVIDED INTO THREE UNITS:

Unit I (late 1800’s - 1949) Unit II (1950’s and 1960’s) Unit III (1970’s - present)

  • Each unit packet contains lyrics and some supplementary reading materials you will need for class. Please understand that having these materials in class is absolutely critical to doing well in the course! These materials are not available anywhere else, nor is information from class!

  • Only students enrolled in the class are able to access these required materials online through eReserve. Go to the university home page (www.txstate.edu) and then to the library home page. Click on eReserve; under services, select electronic reserve and reserve pages; enter SOCI 3333, then search; click on SOCI 3333; accept the eReserve terms; enter the course password (announced in class); select the unit you need, open it and/or download it as a pdf file; then print it out. Lyrics packets range in size from over 50 to 100 pages, so students may want to print them off at a university lab or the Alkek Library free of charge.

  • Please remember that packet materials (including lyrics) are copyrighted materials that remain the property and copyright of their owners. Even in the university setting, “fair use” guidelines apply, meaning that there are laws governing their distribution. Getting your ONE copy for educational use, restricted to the class on eReserve or at the library Reserve Desk, is the only way for you to get this information. Please do not copy these materials.

  • ^ (OPTIONAL) TEXT: Rockin’ Out: Popular Music in the USA by Reebee Garofalo, 1st (1997), 2nd ed. (2002), or 3rd (2004) ed., Allyn & Bacon. Buying this text is completely optional and only recommended for those students avidly interested in or majoring in music, sound technology, advertising, etc. Students buying and reading this textbook will have no “edge” or benefit for doing better in the class than students who choose not to use the book.


^ CLASS ATTENDANCE:

  • Each student will have an assigned seat in the class, selected the first day of class. The professor will assign seats to any students missing the first class day. Any student not sitting in his/her assigned seat will be marked absent for that day, and any student who talks or disrupts class will be moved immediately.

  • Each student is expected to attend all meetings of this class, arrive on time, and remain in the classroom until the class is over once class has begun. Do not leave the classroom unless it is of critical importance or you have been authorized to do so by the professor.

  • Each student is responsible for personally signing in (full signature, no initials) on the attendance sheet. The professor’s graduate assistant will also check roll throughout the semester.

  • Any student found cheating on the attendance sheet in any way forfeits any extra-credit based on attendance; do not sign in for anyone else, ever!

  • Any student who misses class is responsible for finding out what was missed in class and obtaining any notes from another student in the class.


^ REQUIRED ASSIGNMENTS :

  • Students will earn ten points at the beginning of the semester for completing their student information sheet and turning in a signed statement with picture (worth five points for both). Both are attached to this syllabus.

  • Students are also required to do an out-of-class web assignment that meets departmental requirements for a web-based assignment in each sociology course. The cover sheet with instructions is attached to this syllabus.

  • All out-of-class assignments must be typed, grammatically correct, and submitted as hardcopy. No e-mail or Internet submissions will be accepted for credit. In an emergency situation and only with the approval of the professor, an assignment may be submitted by fax to 512-245-8362.

  • No work will be accepted late without a written explanation and documentation of a university-excused absence attached as a coversheet to the assignment.

  • No out-of-class assignment will be returned to the student unless a copy of the original is requested in writing.

  • SOCIOLOGY MAJORS must provide two copies of the web assignment for inclusion in their departmental portfolios. These portfolios enable students to document the knowledge and skills learned during their college education and have been shown to be a tremendous boon to students when they apply for graduate school and/or jobs during college and/or after graduation. All majors might want to consider maintaining a portfolio throughout their college careers.


TESTS:

  • Tests I and II have 50 multiple-choice questions worth 2 points each.

  • The Final exam has 66 multiple-choice questions worth 1½ points each (for 99 pts + 1 freebee point). The final will not be comprehensive unless required by the department. Students in the class will take the final at the exam time posted in the Schedule of Classes.

  • Students must be in class regularly to pass the tests and do well in the course!

  • Any make-up test(s) will be administered during the regularly scheduled final exam time at the end of the course, but this should be avoided if at all possible.


^ SEMESTER GRADE COMPUTATION: A student's final grade in the course will be

based on the total number of points accumulated:

Test I and Test II (Max. of 100 pts. ea.) = 200

Final (max. 100 pts) = 100

Required assignments (incl. web assignment) = ^ 20

Total maximum cumulative points: = 320


Final Grade> Cumm. Pts. Range

A 90 - 100% 288 - 320 Points B 80 - 89% 256 - 287 Points C 70 - 79% 224 - 255 Points D 60 - 69% 192 - 223 Points

F Below 60% Below 192 Points


*NOTE: Since grades are a confidential matter and fall under student privacy laws, I will not discuss grades over the phone or e-mail either during or after the semester.


^ TENTATIVE TOPIC OUTLINE AND CLASS SCHEDULE: Please note that students should have unit song lyrics for each class other than test days!


Unit I: (Optional reading in the Garofalo test is Chapters 1 - 3)

Day 1: Syllabus and announcements

Day 2: Introduction to Course eReserve notes

Day 3: History of American popular music eReserve notes

Day 4: 1900 – 1915 Coursepak: The First Decade and The Tens

Day 5: 1916 – 1925 Coursepak: The Twenties

Day 6: 1925 - 1930

Days 7&8: 1930’s to pre-WWII Coursepak: The Thirties and

The Forties

Day 9: WWII – 1949

Day 10: TEST I


Unit II: (Optional reading in the Garofalo test is Chapters 4 - 7)

Day 11: 1950’s Coursepak: The Fifties

Day 12: 1950’s concluded; intro 60’s

Days 13-19: 1960’s Coursepak: The Sixties

Day 20: TEST II


Unit III: (Optional reading in Garofalo test is Chapters 8 - 11 or 12 depending on the textbook edition)

Days 21-22: 1970’s Coursepak: The Seventies

eReserve notes: punk & disco

Days 23-25: 1980’s Coursepak: The Eighties

Days 26-28: 1990’s Coursepak: The Nineties

eReserve notes: & Beyond


THE FINAL: Monday, May 5, from 2 – 4:30 p.m.


^ IMPORTANT PROFESSOR POLICIES AND NOTES:

I. STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: Students with special needs (as documented by the Office of Disability Services) are responsible for identifying themselves and personally discussing with the professor the necessary accommodations at the beginning of the semester to ensure that all requirements, guidelines and processes are followed. The Department of Sociology is dedicated to providing students with the necessary academic adjustments and auxiliary aids to facilitate their participation and performance in the classroom.


^ II. EXTRA-CREDIT OPPORTUNITY BASED ON ATTENDANCE: As an incentive to attend ALL CLASS MEETINGS, ON TIME:

  • Each student is responsible for personally signing in (full signature, no initials) on the attendance sheet. Do not sign in for anyone else in the class. Attendance will also be taken each class by the graduate assistant using the seating chart.

  • Any student found cheating on the attendance sheet in any way forfeits the opportunity for extra-credit based on attendance and may be reported to Student Justice for cheating in the class.

  • Students with on-time attendance and no absences will have 30 points added to their total points earned by the end of the semester.

  • Students with one absence will have 20 points added to their total points.

  • Students with two absences will have 10 points added to their total points.

  • ^ THIS POLICY IS BASED ON THE TOTAL NUMBER OF ABSENCES, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT THE ABSENCE IS EXCUSED OR UNEXCUSED.

  • Students with excused absences during the class should let me know, not for any extra-credit points, but to be sure that the reason(s) for non-attendance may be taken into consideration when assigning the final grade. For example, a student with one excused absence for the semester will be eligible for 20 extra-credit points at the end of the semester. IF the student has a “borderline grade,” and the one absence is excused, the odds are likely that I will bump up the student’s grade to the next highest letter grade. Students with several absences for the semester will NOT be “bumped up” to the next highest letter grade.

  • ^ Please note that there are no “blanket” excuses given for any portion of the semester or for the entire semester. I have had some students recently provide medical documentation at the beginning of the semester, then not attend class all semester and expect to be able to make up all class work at the very end of the semester. This practice is unacceptable, unfair to the other students, and students erroneously expecting such preferential treatment generally fail the course.

  • These additional points extra-credit points for attendance may impact a student’s final grade by one to two letter grades, particularly in conjunction with class participation points.


^ III. TEACHING THEATER POLICIES:

  • In an effort to maintain the integrity of the facilities and equipment, to promote class order, the Teaching Theater Staff has instituted the following:

  • --Cell phones and pagers must be turned off!

--No food or open drink containers allowed (only bottles with a screw top)

--No tobacco products of any type allowed

--Do not place feet on seat backs

--Enter and exit through assigned doorways

--Check with the theater technician for lost & found items

  • THE teaching theater technician and graduate assistant share full authority with the professor in monitoring and regulating classroom behavior, policies, and courtesies. Please be most respectful of them! Thanks!

  • ^ EMERGENCY PROCEDURES: In the case of fire or if an alarm is sounded, evacuate through the closest exit door in an orderly fashion (no pushing or running), and move away from the building unless instructed by safety personnel to do otherwise.

  • MEDICAL EMERGENCY PROCEDURES: In the event of illness or injury during class, notify the professor or graduate assistant or media technician immediately. All students need to remain seated to provide Emergency Personnel access to the individual requiring attention.


^ IV. STUDENT EXPECTATIONS OF THE PROFESSOR:

  • The professor will respect students and the classroom experience, which includes managing the classroom environment (see VI. below).

  • The professor will practice fairness in the treatment of students and in grading.

  • The professor will attend every class, and will begin and end class on time.

  • The professor will be available to students during office hours or by appointment.

  • The professor will provide prompt feedback on test grades.

  • The professor will provide students with the guidelines and requirements that facilitate student success in the class.

  • The professor will provide students with facts relative to the course rather than trying to further any personal (or political) agenda. Professor opinions will be infrequent and will be stated as such.


^ V. EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS:

  • Students will attend all meetings of this class, arrive on time, and remain in the classroom until the class is over once class has begun. (Students will not leave the classroom during class unless it is critical to do so.)

  • Students arriving late to class or leaving class early will provide the professor with a written explanation, by e-mail and/or in person.

  • Students will provide written explanations/documentation for each absence to be noted as excused for consideration when assigning the final grade. Students will regularly check their e-mail for any important notices about the class.

  • Classroom courtesy and civility is required at all times. Any student who disrupts class will face serious consequences as outlined in VI.


^ VI. CLASSROOM DISRUPTIONS : In the classroom environment (particularly those in large classrooms, when students may feel somewhat protected due to their anonymity), it is crucial that classroom civility and respect, as well as an environment conducive to learning, are maintained. Classroom disruption is prohibited in Section 2.02 of Texas State’s Code of Student Conduct and will not be tolerated in this classroom. Students who disrupt class, as determined by the professor, will face appropriate sanctions ranging from a verbal and/or written warning, to administrative intervention (including possible suspension from the class through Student Justice), to reduction of final grade. The professor in this class reserves the right to lower a student’s final semester grade by one full letter grade with each successive classroom disruption. Repeated classroom disruption will likely lead to a failing grade in the course. Classroom disruptions include, but are not limited to, the following unacceptable behaviors:

  • Talking / whispering / outbursts / passing notes / making loud or distracting noises (such as yawning loudly) during lectures and in class.

  • Rudeness / disrespect to other students, the professor or the professor’s assistant (s).

  • Tardiness, walking in and out of class, and/or leaving class early without authorization (notifying the professor in advance or an excused absence).

  • Cell phone and/or electronic equipment use (in any form, including talking, listening, checking for calls or messages, text messaging in any form, playing games, listening to music). Be sure to put your cell phone on vibrate before class begins.

  • Reading or working on any materials in class that are not part of the classroom activities (i.e. reading newspapers or texts / doing homework for another class).

  • Monopolizing classroom discussions and/or getting discussions off topic.

  • Putting feet up on another chair or climbing over the seats.

  • Dozing or sleeping in class; any student who is that tired should stay home and sleep rather than attend class.

  • Personal insults, abusing the professor or other students verbally or by making offensive remarks, or physical threats.

  • Coming to class under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance other than prescription medicine.

  • Eating or drinking in the classroom.

  • Any behavior or activity interfering with the conduct, instruction, and education of a class.


^ VII. CLASSROOM ISSUES: Issues discussed in this class include racism, sexism, classism, sex, drug use, deviance and violence, and other adult subject matter relevant to twentieth-century America. The content of some lyrics, discussions, and/or video presentations could be objectionable to some. It is important to remember that all material presented and discussed in class must be considered “in context;” none of it should be taken or directed personally. Each student enrolled in the course needs to consider these issues at the beginning of the course to decide whether or not this course is appropriate for him/her. Any student who feels that he/she might be uncomfortable with the subject matter should discuss any concerns with the professor promptly to determine whether the student will be able to commit to the course and remain enrolled or whether he/she should drop the course and enroll in another course.


^ VIII. COURSE MATERIALS AND THE INTERNET: Please remember that many course materials (handouts, readings, exercises) used in college classrooms are copyrighted materials and/or the intellectual property of others (including your professor). It is likely that posting these materials to the web or to any Internet site without the permission of the professor or appropriate author would involve a violation of copyright law and/or intellectual property rights. Don’t assume it is okay; ask!


^ IX. IMPORTANT UNIVERSITY DEADLINES & REQUIREMENTS:

  • A student is not automatically dropped from class by the professor because of poor attendance; therefore, a student who quits coming to class and who fails to drop the course at all will invariably have earned a grade of “F” by semester’s end.

  • The deadline by which a student may withdraw from the class with an automatic grade of “W”(Withdrawal) is around mid-semester; after that date, a student cannot drop the course unless he/she withdraws from the university and drops all classes. After the automatic “W” deadline, the professor must assign a grade based on the student’s actual performance in the class, generally an “F” (Failing) for a student doing poorly, or in the case of a student withdrawing from the university, a “W” (Withdraw Passing) or an “F” (Failing). All deadline dates are posted in the Schedule of Classes for each semester.

  • Grades of “I” (Incomplete) are only approved under extenuating circumstances when some small portion of the class remains uncompleted. An “I” grade requires a signed agreement between the student and the professor.


^ X. ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT: Honesty and integrity are crucial to the Texas State University – San Marcos academic community, which includes this classroom. Cheating and any form of scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated in this classroom. Cheating includes plagiarism and any and all attempts to seek assistance during an exam from another person or from notes, books, or any piece of clothing or any other materials. Any student caught cheating in this course will face specific departmental sanctions as well as sanctions outlined in the Texas State student handbook. The bottom line is Don’t Do It; cheating is not worth the risk and the consequences! Instead, attend class, participate in classroom activities, read your text, and study hard for your tests. I have every confidence in you and your abilities, and I think you will be amazed and happy with the result of your hard work and efforts in terms of your final grade in the course.


SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT (Be sure to read this!): The phrase, academic dishonesty, includes a variety of transgressions. It refers to acts such as cheating on a test to committing plagiarism when writing a paper. The Sociology Department assumes that it is the responsibility of each student to know what constitutes academic dishonesty. A lack of understanding of the phrase is no excuse when academic dishonesty is at issue. Similarly, a student may not be excused from a current transgression because he/she committed a similar act in the past and was not charged with a violation of university policy. Any student who is accused with academic dishonesty has the right to challenge the accusation, but the challenge must be submitted in writing and in accordance with university policy. University statements regarding academic dishonesty can be found at the following websites:

http://www.mrp.txstate.edu:16080/studenthandbook/rules.html#academic

(Texas State Student Handbook)

http://www.txstate.edu/effective/upps/upps-07-10-01.html (Academic Honesty, UPPS No. 07.10.01)

A complete statement on the policy of the Department of Sociology regarding academic dishonesty (including plagiarism) is available on the departmental website www.soci.txstate.edu.


Remember: ignorance of what constitutes academic dishonesty or having participated in academic dishonesty in the past without being penalized does not excuse such acts in the Department of Sociology.


^ XI. YOUR PROFESSOR MAY MAKE CHANGES TO THIS SYLLABUS THAT WILL BE ANNOUNCED IN CLASS. Students are responsible for remaining apprised of such changes and announced test dates.


ANY QUESTIONS???


THANKS AGAIN FOR SIGNING UP FOR MY CLASS, AND I HOPE WE HAVE A GREAT TIME LEARNING TOGETHER THIS SEMESTER!

NOTE: THIS PAGE IS A COPY OF THE INFORMATION LISTED ON THE NEXT TO LAST PAGE THAT YOU WILL SIGN AND TURN IN AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER. I WANTED YOU TO HAVE A COPY OF THE ABBREVIATED LIST OF COURSE POLICIES TO REMEMBER.


The syllabus for any class is basically a contract between the professor and each student, and it is important that each student understands the expectations and policies of the professor. *


I have read and understand the professor’s syllabus for SOCI 3333, SPRING 2008. I realize that my failure to meet these requirements will likely negatively influence my semester grade in the course.

_____________________________ ____________________________ Seat#:_____

(PRINT your name) (SIGNATURE)


^ *READ THIS ABBREVIATED LIST OF POLICIES AND REMEMBER THEM!

1. Students are expected to attend all meetings of this class, arrive on time, and remain in class the entire time until the class is over. Students will sit in their assigned seat and will be moved if they disrupt class. Students who are tardy or leave class are absent for the day without written notice to the professor. Students missing class are responsible for getting notes and finding out what they missed from another student in the class. Students are responsible for obtaining copies of e-Reserve materials.

2. Students are responsible for personally signing the class roster (full signature) for attendance purposes and forfeit all extra-credit points for attendance if they sign in for someone else.

3. Make-ups for missed tests are always at the time of the final exam.

4. Extra-credit points for attendance are based on the total number of absences, whether or not the absence is excused. Excused absences are taken into consideration in the case of a borderline grade at the end of the semester, though, so students need to keep the professor apprised of excused absences. Students with several absences for the semester will NOT be “bumped up” to the next highest letter grade.

^ 5. Classroom participation points are part of the semester grade, not extra credit points, and they significantly impact a student’s final grade. Students may only make up these assignments with a university excused absence. A cover sheet with written explanation/documentation of the excused absence must be attached to the make-up work for any credit. No “blanket” excuses for a portion of, or the entire semester, will allow students to disregard class and then make up work at the end of the semester.

^ 6. All out of class assignments must be typewritten, grammatically correct, and submitted as hardcopy. No e-mail submissions will be accepted for credit.

7. Sociology majors must turn in two copies of their web assignment for inclusion in their student portfolios.

8. Classroom disruptions will not be tolerated in this class. Disruptions include talking/ whispering/outbursts/passing notes/making loud or distracting noises (such as yawning loudly) during lectures and in class; rudeness or disrespect to others in the class; tardiness/walking in and out of class/leaving class early without permission; cell phone or electronic equipment use (in any form, including checking for calls or messages and text messaging in any form); reading or working on any materials not part of the class; dozing or sleeping n class; personal insults, abusing the professor or other students verbally or making offensive remarks, or physical threats; coming to class under the influences of alcohol or a controlled substance other than prescription medicine, eating or drinking in the classroom; and any behavior or activity interfering with the conduct, instruction, and education of a class.

^ 9. All material presented and discussed in class must be discussed “in context;” none of it should be taken or directed personally.

10. Academic dishonesty and / or cheating of any kind will not be tolerated in this classroom and will have serious consequences as outlined in departmental and university policies.

^ 11. Office hours end the last day of class.

12. Students are responsible for meeting university and departmental requirements and deadlines relative to their college courses (see the university Schedule of Classes.)


STUDENT: ___________________________ (Print your name) SPRING 2008


___________________________ (Signature) Seat #: ____________


^ SOCIOLOGY OF POP MUSIC WEB ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET

(Attach this completed cover sheet to the front of your web assignment.)


The Department of Sociology has decided that web-based assignments are an important part of a student’s educational career and should be a requirement in every course. Your web assignment in this course is to go on-line to your choice of websites for your favorite group or artist. Read and print his/her/their biography, the song lyrics, and anything else that interests you or that you feel might interest your professor.


Next, write your own personal analysis of the song. Be sure to HAVE FUN with this assignment, and earn 10 points while you are at it. I always learn a great deal from your work that helps me with the Pop Music class! Thanks!


(This assignment is REQUIRED and due at the beginning of class on the date announced in class. Your paper must be typed and grammatically correct. Please note also that a hardcopy of all materials must be submitted; no E-mail or Internet submissions will be accepted for credit. I need to have printed materials for my files. Thanks!)


SONG: ______________________________________________________________


^ ARTIST / GROUP: ____________________________________________________


ALBUM TITLE:_________________________________________ YEAR: ______


REQUIRED MATERIALS (BE SURE YOU HAVE ALL THE FOLLOWING AND ATTACH THEM IN THIS ORDER TO YOUR COVERSHEET):


^ I. STUDENT ANALYSIS of the song selected: _______


Why is this particular song your favorite (or one of your favorite)? Is it a reflection of American culture & society at a particular time? How?


II. BIO OF ARTIST / GROUP (hardcopy, printed from website): ______


III. LYRICS (hardcopy, printed from website, CD liner cover, or typed if unavailable elsewhere): ______


OPTIONAL:


COMMENTS FROM CHAT ROOMS (printed from website): ______


HAVE YOU INCLUDED ANYTHING EXTRA? (IF SO, WHAT? and WHY?) _____


^ REQUIRED OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENT I: (Both Parts A AND B must be turned in during the first two weeks to earn five points, and the signed statement must be turned in prior to test I or the grade will be posted as “0” (zero) in my grade book.)

A. Tape or staple a photo of yourself from a student ID, driver’s license or another photo that looks like you. Be sure you print your name on the back of the picture.

^ B. Read the syllabus for the class thoroughly, and then sign the following statement.

The syllabus for any class is basically a contract between the professor and each student, and it is important that each student understands the expectations and policies of the professor. *

I have read and understand the professor’s syllabus for SOCI 3333, SPRING 2008. I realize that my failure to meet these requirements will likely negatively influence my semester grade in the course.

_____________________________ ____________________________ Seat#:_____

(PRINT your name) (SIGNATURE)


^ *READ THIS ABBREVIATED LIST OF POLICIES AND REMEMBER THEM!

1. Students are expected to attend all meetings of this class, arrive on time, and remain in class the entire time until the class is over. Students will sit in their assigned seat and will be moved if they disrupt class. Students who are tardy or leave class are absent for the day without written notice to the professor. Students missing class are responsible for getting notes and finding out what they missed from another student in the class. Students are responsible for obtaining copies of e-Reserve materials.

2. Students are responsible for personally signing the class roster (full signature) for attendance purposes and forfeit all extra-credit points for attendance if they sign in for someone else.

^ 3. Make-ups for missed tests are always at the time of the final exam.

4. Extra-credit points for attendance are based on the total number of absences, whether or not the absence is excused. Excused absences are taken into consideration in the case of a borderline grade at the end of the semester, though, so students need to keep the professor apprised of excused absences. Students with several absences for the semester will NOT be “bumped up” to the next highest letter grade.

^ 5. Classroom participation points are part of the semester grade, not extra credit points, and they significantly impact a student’s final grade. Students may only make up these assignments with a university excused absence. A cover sheet with written explanation/documentation of the excused absence must be attached to the make-up work for any credit. No “blanket” excuses for a portion of, or the entire semester, will allow students to disregard class and then makeup work at the end of the semester.

^ 6. All out of class assignments must be typewritten, grammatically correct, and submitted as hardcopy. No e-mail submissions will be accepted for credit.

7. Sociology majors must turn in two copies of their web assignment for inclusion in their student portfolios.

8. Classroom disruptions will not be tolerated in this class. Disruptions include talking/ whispering/outbursts/passing notes/making loud or distracting noises (such as yawning loudly) during lectures and in class; rudeness or disrespect to others in the class; tardiness/walking in and out of class/leaving class early without permission; cell phone or electronic equipment use (in any form, including checking for calls or messages and text messaging in any form); reading or working on any materials not part of the class; dozing or sleeping n class; personal insults, abusing the professor or other students verbally or making offensive remarks, or physical threats; coming to class under the influences of alcohol or a controlled substance other than prescription medicine, eating or drinking in the classroom; and any behavior or activity interfering with the conduct, instruction, and education of a class.

^ 9. All material presented and discussed in class must be discussed “in context;” none of it should be taken or directed personally.

10. Academic dishonesty and / or cheating of any kind will not be tolerated in this classroom and will have serious consequences as outlined in departmental and university policies.

11. Office hours end the last day of class.

12. Students are responsible for meeting university and departmental requirements and deadlines relative to their college courses (see the university Schedule of Classes.)

^ SOCIOLOGY 3333 SPRING 2008 STUDENT INFO SHEET (PHOTO

(Required, and worth 5 points of your class participation grade) HERE)


Print your Name: ___________________________________


Signature: _________________________________________


Seat #: ______ E-mail address(es): ______________________


Have I had you in class(es) before? _____Yes _____No If yes, please list the class(es) and semester(s) if you remember:


Classification: ___ Sr ___Jr ___Soph ___Fr ___Grad

Major: __________________________ Minor: ______________________


Hometown: ________________ Age: ______ Last 4 digits of Student ID#: ________


Current Mailing Address: _______________________________________________


Phone #: _____________________ (to be used only in case of critical need!)


(For non-sociology majors or minors), have you had a sociology course before? _____Yes _____No What course(s)? __________________________


Have you had prior college work other than Texas State? If so, where? # of hours?


Do you work other than school? If so, where and # of hrs/week?


Hobbies/Activities:


What are your favorite academic subjects?


Career goals:


Why are you taking this course?


What do you expect from this course? What do you hope to learn?


What are your expectations of your professor?


Tell me your favorite song, the name of the artist/group, and why it is your favorite song! (Feel free to write as much as you’d like about this question or any others on the back of this sheet!)




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